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NEWS
October 4, 1987
Doctors in New York state will soon be prohibited from working more than 80 hours a week in an effort to ease the strain on overburdened interns and residents at teaching hospitals, health officials said. They said the proposal, expected to take effect in July, 1988, would be the nation's first limit on doctors' working hours. No doctor in training would be permitted to work shifts longer than 24 hours and those in emergency rooms would be limited to 12-hour shifts, officials said.
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NEWS
April 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government has agreed to reconsider tens of thousands of cases in which benefits were denied to people who said they could not work because of mental or physical ailments, a published report said. The agreement is part of a proposed settlement of a lawsuit filed on behalf of more than 200,000 New York state residents, the New York Times reported in today's editions.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Just before Congress adjourned for the Christmas holidays last week, it passed a little-noticed law creating yet another commission that will be financed with just $1 million--hardly enough to pay staff salaries and buy lunches for the 12 as yet unnamed commission members. But if things go well, the new National Economic Commission set up by Congress certainly should help put this country on a less confrontational course in setting national economic policies.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department, contending that the mob has dominated the New York and New Jersey waterfront for almost a century, on Wednesday filed a massive civil racketeering lawsuit against top officers of the International Longshoremen's Assn., several dockworker employers and dozens of reputed Mafia figures. The civil action seeks to put the entire waterfront under court supervision.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.S. government has agreed to reconsider tens of thousands of cases in which benefits were denied to people who said they could not work because of mental or physical ailments, a published report said. The agreement is part of a proposed settlement of a lawsuit filed on behalf of more than 200,000 New York state residents, the New York Times reported in today's editions.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department, contending that the mob has dominated the New York and New Jersey waterfront for almost a century, on Wednesday filed a massive civil racketeering lawsuit against top officers of the International Longshoremen's Assn., several dockworker employers and dozens of reputed Mafia figures. The civil action seeks to put the entire waterfront under court supervision.
SPORTS
October 1, 1994 | Associated Press
Striking baseball players will not be able to collect unemployment benefits in New York, state Labor Commissioner John Hudacs ruled Friday. The action by Hudacs came after a state senator expressed outrage that New York was the only state where striking players could collect benefits. State Sen. Joseph Holland had promised to submit legislation that would keep major leaguers from collecting unemployment checks.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The full weight of a New York welcome descended Friday upon a travel-weary Lech Walesa. Labor leaders and politicians at a Manhattan breakfast bestowed upon him caps, pins, cliches--(". . . You scrapped the Iron Curtain and forged it into a train of freedom," one steelworker told him)--and even a set of electrician's tools in tribute to his workingman's roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2004 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
The company that runs the county's traffic school is under scrutiny from the newest county supervisor because one of its top officials was recently convicted of bribing a New York state labor commissioner. Because of that conviction, Orange County should take a hard look before renewing the National Traffic Safety Institute's contract, said newly elected Supervisor Lou Correa.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newspaper wars in New York City took a strange turn Thursday when a captain in the Bonanno organized crime family and a dozen of his associates were indicted on charges of operating a criminal enterprise at the New York Post and helping the tabloid's top management intentionally defraud advertisers by falsely inflating circulation figures. The New York Post Corp. pleaded guilty to the felony of scheming to defraud in the first degree and was fined $10,000. Richard T.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Just before Congress adjourned for the Christmas holidays last week, it passed a little-noticed law creating yet another commission that will be financed with just $1 million--hardly enough to pay staff salaries and buy lunches for the 12 as yet unnamed commission members. But if things go well, the new National Economic Commission set up by Congress certainly should help put this country on a less confrontational course in setting national economic policies.
NEWS
October 4, 1987
Doctors in New York state will soon be prohibited from working more than 80 hours a week in an effort to ease the strain on overburdened interns and residents at teaching hospitals, health officials said. They said the proposal, expected to take effect in July, 1988, would be the nation's first limit on doctors' working hours. No doctor in training would be permitted to work shifts longer than 24 hours and those in emergency rooms would be limited to 12-hour shifts, officials said.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
After more than 24 years as a Trans World Airlines flight attendant, Elizabeth Rich was fired. The charge: theft of company property. The goods: four leftover half-pint cartons of milk and a TWA toilet kit issued to a New York-to-Paris passenger who left it behind in a seat pocket. Rich is not disputing that she took the items--"TWA's garbage," she calls them--nor does she condone theft.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2002 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had the terrorists' goal been sheer economic destruction, they hardly could have hit a bigger target. Where else in the United States--or the world, for that matter--could such a strike cause losses approaching $100 billion? One year after the World Trade Center attack, New York City's economy is struggling, lagging behind the nation in job creation and economic output after several years of stock market-fueled brilliance.
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