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March 27, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor David N. Dinkins orders both Bill Clinton and Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. to a summit meeting to find out precisely what they can offer urban America. Former Mayor Edward I. Koch declares both candidates are losers and is pitching for a protest vote. Popular radio talk show host Don Imus labels Clinton "Slick Willie" and compares the Arkansas governor to discredited preachers Jimmy Swaggart and Jim Bakker.
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NEWS
November 5, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The candidate's spouse is hopscotching across this giant city, rushing from one borough to another, stirring up excitement among supporters. Just another election in the Big Apple? Hardly. Normally choked intersections empty and traffic moves aside as the power of a presidential motorcade sweeps through the Bronx, Harlem and Brooklyn to whoop up the Democratic fervor for Hillary Rodham Clinton in the waning days of her campaign for a seat in the U.S. Senate. "She sent a representative.
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NEWS
March 5, 2000 | By GERALDINE BAUM,
Texas Gov. George W. Bush's plane had barely touched down on Long Island last week before he found himself in the middle of a typical New York blood feud of the political sort. By his side at a forum on breast cancer research--Bush's attack weapon du jour against Sen. John McCain--were the two most powerful politicians in the state. Both are Republicans and Bush supporters more (Gov. George Pataki) or less (New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani).
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of fierce campaigning, New York's Senate race between Hillary Rodham Clinton and Rep. Rick Lazio is too close to call, according to a flurry of recent polls. And as the $60-million battle draws to a close, it has turned unusually nasty, even by New York standards.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | the Washington Post
New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, contemplating a Senate race, had some fun at the expense of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, who is also considering the same Senate bid. Giuliani, who has a penchant for dressing in costume--he wore a dress and wig on NBC-TV's "Saturday Night Live"--donned a red Arkansas jacket and cap and announced he was headed to Little Rock. "I'm going to say, 'I've never lived in Arkansas. I've never worked in Arkansas. I've never been to Arkansas.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If President Clinton seems a tad forlorn these days, who can blame him? With both his vice president and his wife in various stages of leaving him, Clinton indeed cuts a lonely figure at times. "We don't have lunch every week, and I miss that terribly," the president said of Al Gore during an hourlong news conference Wednesday.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hillary Rodham Clinton said Monday that Rudolph W. Giuliani is tapping into a network of right-wing, non-New Yorkers to help pile up his fund-raising lead in their Senate contest. The first lady said the Republican New York mayor is utilizing a "broad national network of people who are opposed to what I would do in the Senate." "He is playing on their fears and sending out these direct-mail requests and people that are seeing them are responding to it," said Mrs.
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | Associated Press
Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani's Senate campaign is far ahead of Hillary Rodham Clinton's in the fund-raising race, but huge numbers of small checks are helping both campaigns get rich, according to Federal Election Commission filings released Saturday. Giuliani's campaign raised $7.36 million between Jan. 1 and March 31, while Clinton raised $4.73 million, the campaigns reported.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A former Republican congressman joined the race for Senate on Monday, endangering Rudolph W. Giuliani's grasp on conservative votes that have kept the New York City mayor neck-and-neck with Hillary Rodham Clinton in the polls. "Right now, they're popping the champagne corks at Clinton campaign headquarters," GOP consultant and television commentator Jay Severin said Monday after former Rep. Joseph DioGuardi announced his candidacy. Clinton spokeswoman Karen Dunn said the campaign had no comment.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.) fell and cut his lip during a Memorial Day parade Monday, and it took eight stitches to close up the wound. Lazio, who recently replaced New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani as the GOP Senate candidate challenging Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton, stopped along the parade route in this Long Island town to shake hands. He was sprinting back to rejoin the march--as he had done several times before--when he lost his footing and fell on his face.
NEWS
October 19, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting this weekend, thousands of Jewish voters in New York will receive a Republican mailer with a photograph of Hillary Rodham Clinton hugging Suha Arafat, the wife of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. The message: Jews cannot trust Clinton to protect the security of Israel. "Mrs. Clinton tries to paint herself as a friend of Israel, but her actions prove otherwise," said Dan Allen, spokesman for the New York State Republican Committee, which is producing the brochure.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frequently nasty confrontation, Senate candidates Hillary Rodham Clinton and Rep. Rick Lazio traded angry charges Wednesday during a nationally televised debate. But they also touched on issues in their first face-to-face confrontation in New York's hotly contested Senate race. The contest has been deadlocked for months, according to numerous public opinion polls, and both candidates had pledged to discuss substantial issues, such as health care, education, the environment and tax reform.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton kicked off two days of fund-raisers Friday in upstate New York for the first lady's U.S. Senate bid. Hundreds of well-wishers greeted the first couple at Syracuse Hancock Airport, some waving banners, before the two headed off to a barbecue, the first of the weekend's fund-raising events designed to boost the coffers of Mrs. Clinton's Senate campaign.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | Associated Press
Positioning itself firmly against Pat Buchanan, the state branch of the Reform Party endorsed a little-known physicist for president Thursday. "I never knew being so far behind was such an asset," joked John Hagelin, who hopes to wrest the nomination from front-runner Buchanan in the nationwide mail-in primary that started this week. Since party founder Ross Perot has decided against running, Hagelin has emerged as the sole challenger to Buchanan for the nomination and $12.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.) fell and cut his lip during a Memorial Day parade Monday, and it took eight stitches to close up the wound. Lazio, who recently replaced New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani as the GOP Senate candidate challenging Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton, stopped along the parade route in this Long Island town to shake hands. He was sprinting back to rejoin the march--as he had done several times before--when he lost his footing and fell on his face.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
From the gym of his former high school on Long Island, relatively unknown Republican Rep. Rick Lazio catapulted himself Saturday into the nation's most-talked-about political campaign--the Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. "You can tell from my accent that I am a lifelong New Yorker," Lazio said in an obvious swipe at the first lady. "I don't have to fake it. . . . I've never needed an exploratory committee to help me figure out where I wanted to live."
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Republicans scramble to find a successor to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in the U.S. Senate race, all eyes are turning toward Rick Lazio, an up-and-coming but little-known Long Island congressman who appears to be the solid favorite of Gov. George Pataki and other GOP leaders to carry on the fight against Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush will travel to New York and California next week for a series of Republican political events, the White House said Wednesday. Bush will leave Wednesday for a Staten Island fund-raising dinner to benefit the congressional campaign of Republican Susan Molinari. He will fly that evening to San Francisco to stump for Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.), who is running for governor.
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Republicans scramble to find a successor to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in the U.S. Senate race, all eyes are turning toward Rick Lazio, an up-and-coming but little-known Long Island congressman who appears to be the solid favorite of Gov. George Pataki and other GOP leaders to carry on the fight against Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showing a vulnerable side New Yorkers rarely see, Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani on Friday dropped out of the U.S. Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton, saying the pressures of dealing with prostate cancer would prevent him from devoting his full attention and energy to the campaign. "I've decided what I should do is put my health first. . . . This is not the right time for me to run for office," Giuliani told an overflow crowd at City Hall.
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