Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNew York Stock Exchange
IN THE NEWS

New York Stock Exchange

BUSINESS
April 5, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Burger King is giving the public a bit of a closer look at its reinvention strategy with its decision to trade its shares publicly again. The hamburger giant said it would become a public company and relist its shares on the New York Stock Exchange within three months. The last time Burger King traded publicly was in 2010, when investment firm 3G Capital took it private for $3.3 billion. In a complex $1.4-billion deal, 3G said late Tuesday that it was selling a 29% stake in the Miami fast-food chain to Justice Holdings, a London acquisition company.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Equity exchange Bats Global Markets Inc. canceled its initial public offering, stunning Wall Street after errors on its own computer systems derailed trading in the stock and forced a halt in Apple Inc. "We believe withdrawing the IPO is the appropriate action to take for our company and our shareholders," Chief Executive Joe Ratterman said in a statement. Asked if that meant Bats is no longer going public, company spokesman Randy Williams said, "Yes, that's correct. " Pulling the IPO capped a day of missteps for the electronic exchange, beginning just as the shares were making their debut.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By Nathaniel Popper
Cy Young Award-winner Clayton Kershaw does not normally receive a warm welcome when he visits New York. On Friday, though, it was all smiles, when the Dodgers left-handed pitcher took to the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Kershaw showed up before the markets opened and watched the ringing of the opening bell (the honor of ringing the bell had already been reserved for a company making its initial public offering). He then palled around with traders on the floor, a number of whom asked when he would be coming to play for the Mets or Yankees.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2012 | Nathaniel Popper
European regulators appear set to shoot down a controversial deal that would have seen Germany's largest stock exchange buy the New York Stock Exchange. In a video message sent to employees of the Big Board on Wednesday, the chief executive of NYSE Euronext, Duncan Niederauer, acknowledged the growing rumors that European regulators are preparing to reject the deal due to fears that the new company would violate antitrust laws. NYSE Euronext and the German exchange, the Deutsche Boerse, announced in February that the German company would acquire the New York exchange and its web of global subsidiaries in an exchange of stock.  Niederauer said Wednesday morning that he and his counterpart at the Deutsche Boerse had not received a final decision from the European Commission, but he expressed his disappointment that the combined company is being viewed as a monopoly threat.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2011 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
New York's senior U.S. senator wants assurance that a merger between the New York Stock Exchange and Germany's Deutsche Boerse would keep "New York" first in the combined parent company's name. Sen. Charles E. Schumer said Sunday that although there were "a number of things to like" about the potential combination, the name of the new entity could be a deal breaker for him. "It is totally logical to keep the NYSE name first," Schumer, a Democrat, said in a statement. "If for some reason, the Germans sought an alternative option, it could be an indication that they are trying to wield an upper hand in the new company and would seek to make other business decisions that could go against New York.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2010 | Reuters
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's dour assessment of the U.S. recovery hit U.S. stocks Wednesday, as the Fed chief's comment on "unusually uncertain" economic prospects discouraged investors. Stocks sank after Bernanke acknowledged the labor market's continued weakness while offering few specific options to stimulate lending and investment. "The market sold off because unfortunately there is no remedy provided in Bernanke's commentary to the rising threat of deflation, the excess capacity in the economy and the malfunctioning of the credit system," said Joe Battipaglia, market strategist at Stifel Nicolaus in Yardley, Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2010 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The stock of Hudson Pacific Properties Inc., a real estate investment trust founded by Los Angeles investor Victor Coleman, closed up 2.4% from its initial offering price in its first day of trading on the New York Stock Exchange. The company, based in West Los Angeles, said it priced its shares at $17 apiece and raised $210.5 million after fees in its initial public offering. Shares closed Thursday at $17.40. Hudson Pacific, which trades under the ticker symbol HPP, said it intends to use the proceeds to repay mortgage debt, to fund acquisitions and for general corporate and working capital purposes.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal regulators still haven't been able to pinpoint the cause of Wall Street's so-called flash crash a month ago, but more than two dozen experts Wednesday told the Securities and Exchange Commission what might work to prevent a repeat — and what won't work. SEC Chairwoman Mary L. Schapiro said the agency was "making progress" in its ongoing review of the market turmoil of May 6, when the Dow Jones industrial average plummeted 700 points in just 15 minutes. Schapiro last month proposed changes to stem future nose dives, most notably a temporary plan for a circuit-breaker mechanism that would halt trading for five minutes in all shares of companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 index should any single stock price change at least 10% during a five-minute period.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
In an attempt to prevent a repeat of this month's rapid market plunge, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday proposed a new circuit-breaker mechanism that would briefly halt trading in individual stocks that experience a 10% price change over a five-minute period. The move came as the SEC and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission said they still had not determined exactly what caused the Dow Jones industrial average to plummet 700 points in just 15 minutes on May 6. In a 151-page report released Tuesday, the agencies said they were focused on six areas as they continued to collect and analyze huge amounts of information.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|