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NEWS
April 29, 1998 | BLAINE HARDEN, WASHINGTON POST
Once you've got the swanky Manhattan apartment, the splendid beach house in the Hamptons and still your stock market dough keeps piling up, what do you invest in? A babe. If the tabloids and the divorce lawyers are to be believed, mistresses (and male consorts) have become as integral a part of Manhattan's dizzying bull-market affluence as $300,000 Lamborghinis, $1,000 bottles of wine and $28,000 Hermes crocodile leather purses.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard
Wells Fargo & Co. challenged a sweeping mortgage-fraud case filed by federal prosecutors in Manhattan, saying any liability was erased in April when it settled a separate, massive investigation of home lending abuses with U.S. and state officials. The New York fraud lawsuit, filed Oct. 9, sought "hundreds of millions of dollars" from Wells. It accused the bank of falsely certifying loans as eligible for Federal Housing Administration insurance for more than a decade.  Wells said Thursday that the False Claims Act suit violated the terms of the earlier settlement, which required the bank to pay more than $5 billion in return for a broad release from further legal claims by the government.  Quiz: How much do you know about California's economy?
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BUSINESS
November 1, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard
Wells Fargo & Co. challenged a sweeping mortgage-fraud case filed by federal prosecutors in Manhattan, saying any liability was erased in April when it settled a separate, massive investigation of home lending abuses with U.S. and state officials. The New York fraud lawsuit, filed Oct. 9, sought "hundreds of millions of dollars" from Wells. It accused the bank of falsely certifying loans as eligible for Federal Housing Administration insurance for more than a decade.  Wells said Thursday that the False Claims Act suit violated the terms of the earlier settlement, which required the bank to pay more than $5 billion in return for a broad release from further legal claims by the government.  Quiz: How much do you know about California's economy?
BUSINESS
January 8, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Arbitron Inc., a provider of radio-station ratings based on audience size, settled a lawsuit by New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo, who alleged that a new method of estimating the number of listeners underrepresented minorities. The settlement requires Arbitron to fix flaws in its methodology, pay $260,000 to settle claims that its system was unfair and contribute $100,000 to minority broadcasters, Cuomo said Wednesday.
NEWS
October 4, 1998 | Associated Press
The city agreed to pay nearly $3 million to settle lawsuits filed by the family of a man choked to death by a police officer. Anthony Baez was playing touch football in the street with his brothers in December 1994 when an errantly thrown ball struck Francis Livoti's patrol car. The officer tried to stop the game and Baez, 29, of Orlando, Fla., died in the ensuing struggle. The Police Department ruled that the officer used an illegal chokehold.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2009 | Bloomberg News
Arbitron Inc., a provider of radio-station ratings based on audience size, settled a lawsuit by New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo, who alleged that a new method of estimating the number of listeners underrepresented minorities. The settlement requires Arbitron to fix flaws in its methodology, pay $260,000 to settle claims that its system was unfair and contribute $100,000 to minority broadcasters, Cuomo said Wednesday.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first of scores of individual trials brought by families of the victims of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 began in a process that could eventually assess multimillion-dollar damages against the bankrupt airline's insurer. A federal jury has ruled that Pan Am was liable for the Dec. 21, 1988, bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, which killed 270 people, 11 of them on the ground. The widow of Pepsico lawyer Robert Pagnucco, Judith Pagnucco, 51, of South Salem, N.Y.
SPORTS
May 11, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He will retire as a New York Yankee, perhaps this year. The caps have come and gone fast, like the summers: seven with the Angels, six with the San Francisco Giants, two with the Minnesota Twins, one with the Kansas City Royals, now two with the Yankees. They were all just caps, at least until last year. The Yankees won the World Series, and Chili Davis wore one of their caps. Tino Martinez had tried to explain the magic to Davis. So had Bernie Williams, and Paul O'Neill, and Derek Jeter.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2001 | Jon Healey
Major record companies filed lawsuits against three more online music companies, accusing them of violating copyrights by offering personalized Web radio services. The lawsuits against Viacom's MTVi Group, MusicMatch Inc. and Xact Radio are the latest shots in an escalating legal battle over how much record companies should collect in royalties from Webcasters.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
The National Rifle Assn., mounting a counterattack against U.S. cities seeking to recover millions of dollars in damages from gun violence, has helped draft legislation in 14 states and Congress to bar cities and states from suing firearm manufacturers. NRA supporters in three more states plan to introduce similar bills when their legislatures convene.
SPORTS
May 11, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He will retire as a New York Yankee, perhaps this year. The caps have come and gone fast, like the summers: seven with the Angels, six with the San Francisco Giants, two with the Minnesota Twins, one with the Kansas City Royals, now two with the Yankees. They were all just caps, at least until last year. The Yankees won the World Series, and Chili Davis wore one of their caps. Tino Martinez had tried to explain the magic to Davis. So had Bernie Williams, and Paul O'Neill, and Derek Jeter.
NEWS
October 4, 1998 | Associated Press
The city agreed to pay nearly $3 million to settle lawsuits filed by the family of a man choked to death by a police officer. Anthony Baez was playing touch football in the street with his brothers in December 1994 when an errantly thrown ball struck Francis Livoti's patrol car. The officer tried to stop the game and Baez, 29, of Orlando, Fla., died in the ensuing struggle. The Police Department ruled that the officer used an illegal chokehold.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | BLAINE HARDEN, WASHINGTON POST
Once you've got the swanky Manhattan apartment, the splendid beach house in the Hamptons and still your stock market dough keeps piling up, what do you invest in? A babe. If the tabloids and the divorce lawyers are to be believed, mistresses (and male consorts) have become as integral a part of Manhattan's dizzying bull-market affluence as $300,000 Lamborghinis, $1,000 bottles of wine and $28,000 Hermes crocodile leather purses.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government is spending about $12,000 to build a two-room jail "suite" for Sheik Omar Abdul Rahman. Besides the standard bed, sink and toilet, Abdul Rahman will have his own shower and a conference room with table and chairs in New York City's Metropolitan Correctional Center, according to jails spokeswoman Sandra Burks. Authorities cited security reasons for the construction. Abdul-Rahman, 55, of Jersey City, N.J., is accused of masterminding a terrorist conspiracy that included the Feb.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's biggest retailer, was sued Thursday by a former employee who says the company systematically avoids paying workers for overtime. The lawsuit, filed in New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan, seeks class-action status for about 20,000 current and former employees living in New York. Similar suits have been filed against Wal-Mart in 11 other states, one of which was recently settled in Colorado for more than $50 million, plaintiffs' attorneys said.
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