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NEWS
October 18, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Squabbling and recriminations have broken out among the media over the press' conduct in the Clarence Thomas confirmation battle. One reporter has quit her paper, another has been publicly revealed to be under investigation for sexual harassment, a third has been condemned as lacking in credibility because of plagiarism. And the press in general has been accused by one of its own of having "congealed into an undifferentiated blob" that is "out of the mainstream" of American thought.
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NATIONAL
June 28, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court cleared the way Monday for the jailing of two reporters who refused to reveal confidential sources to a prosecutor investigating how the name of an undercover CIA operative ended up in a newspaper column. The high court, without comment, declined to hear the appeal of Judith Miller of the New York Times and Matthew Cooper of Time magazine, who had argued that the 1st Amendment protected them from having to identify their sources to special prosecutor Patrick J.
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BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | TAMAR JACOBY, Tamar Jacoby, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the author of "Someone Else's House: America's Struggle for Integration."
When journalist Suzanne DeChillo arrived in Maplewood, N.J., last spring to photograph schoolchildren for one in a series of front-page articles that the New York Times was preparing on race, she wasn't particularly aware of being driven by her own preconceptions. Nevertheless, she wrote in her journal, she couldn't find what she was looking for. For one fleeting moment, she thought she had it: "an image of self-segregation" in the high school cafeteria.
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | TAMAR JACOBY, Tamar Jacoby, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the author of "Someone Else's House: America's Struggle for Integration."
When journalist Suzanne DeChillo arrived in Maplewood, N.J., last spring to photograph schoolchildren for one in a series of front-page articles that the New York Times was preparing on race, she wasn't particularly aware of being driven by her own preconceptions. Nevertheless, she wrote in her journal, she couldn't find what she was looking for. For one fleeting moment, she thought she had it: "an image of self-segregation" in the high school cafeteria.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court cleared the way Monday for the jailing of two reporters who refused to reveal confidential sources to a prosecutor investigating how the name of an undercover CIA operative ended up in a newspaper column. The high court, without comment, declined to hear the appeal of Judith Miller of the New York Times and Matthew Cooper of Time magazine, who had argued that the 1st Amendment protected them from having to identify their sources to special prosecutor Patrick J.
SPORTS
October 20, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Unbuckling the mailbag: Question: Get with the program. You really think Alabama's offense can go round for round with the Ducks' offense? Darren Spicer Answer: You may have not heard about my recent religious conversion to SEC-anity. I actually cut myself shaving today and bled Crimson. Look, I was thoroughly impressed with Oregon's demolition of Arizona State on Thursday night. The Ducks could have scored 100 on the Sun Devils. But I am hardly ready to drop Alabama from No. 1. Given that the Southeastern Conference is 8-1 in Bowl Championship Series title games, I would still pick Alabama over Oregon if the schools met this year - and boy wouldn't that be better to watch than Alabama-Louisiana State.
BOOKS
February 10, 1991 | Karen Stabiner
THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK OF SCIENCE LITERACY, edited by Richard Flaste (Times Books: $24.95; 318 pp.). The New York Times' Science Times pages are a great crossover feature--science deftly dished up for the lay reader. This collection includes pieces that appeared between January, 1987, and March, 1990--as much of a hedge as a book can make against dated material. The result is the equivalent of a big bag of your favorite junk food--say, M&Ms.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | DAVID SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Do newspaper readers and advertisers really care if a newspaper uses color photographs--or striking drawings, charts, graphs, maps and other visual elements that can make a paper appear more attractive and more carefully designed? Many editors throughout the country think so. "The response that we've had from readers tells us very, very clearly that that means something to them," says Christian Anderson, editor of the Orange County Register. "You . . .
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Squabbling and recriminations have broken out among the media over the press' conduct in the Clarence Thomas confirmation battle. One reporter has quit her paper, another has been publicly revealed to be under investigation for sexual harassment, a third has been condemned as lacking in credibility because of plagiarism. And the press in general has been accused by one of its own of having "congealed into an undifferentiated blob" that is "out of the mainstream" of American thought.
WORLD
July 22, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon on Thursday sent Congress a formal assessment of the war in Iraq that describes the insurgency as "capable, adaptable and intent," but does not disclose details on the readiness of Iraqi security forces. The report, the first of a series required by law at 90-day intervals, provides a generally upbeat view of progress in Iraq, contending that postwar recovery efforts have the support of a majority of Iraqis and the international community.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | Associated Press
A federal judge today delayed the start of John M. Poindexter's Iran-Contra trial by two weeks but said he will proceed with plans to take former President Ronald Reagan's videotaped deposition Friday in Los Angeles. U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene said that "hopefully" Reagan's testimony can be taken in a courtroom of the federal courthouse in Los Angeles.
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