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NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By David Pierson
When the New York Times website went dark Wednesday morning, suspicions that it had been the target of a cyberattack were raised immediately. Those beliefs were seemingly bolstered when Fox Business, citing an unnamed source, reported that the newspaper had been breached . So far, the New York Times has said little, other than blaming internal "technical difficulties. " The paper's website began slowly coming back online shortly after 10 a.m. PDT. Fox has been criticized in the past for jumping the gun. Last June, the organization mistakenly reported the Affordable Care Act had been overturned by the Supreme Court.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The New York Times website appeared to be slowly coming back online after being out for about an hour Wednesday.  The outage, which caught readers and the Times' newsroom offguard, seems to be over.  The New York Times communications department said the site was being restored and that it would post stories to its Facebook page in the meantime.  Earlier, the company said on Twitter that the problem was a "server issue" that caused its...
BUSINESS
August 14, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The New York Times website was down Wednesday morning because of "technical difficulties," the newspaper said.  Users trying to access nytimes.com were greeted by an error message. The New York Times, via its Twitter feed, did not give an explanation but urged reader to follow its @nytimesworld Twitter account to get the latest news on the Egyptian military's violent crackdown on supporters of outsed President Mohamed Morsi..  New York Times reporters and editors were apparently caught off-guard and began tweeting:  Site's down?
OPINION
July 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In ruling that a New York Times reporter must testify at the trial of a former CIA employee accused of leaking classified information, a federal appeals court has adopted a scorched-earth approach to claims that reporters have a right to protect their sources. If the Obama administration persists in its attempt to force James Risen to violate a pledge of confidentiality, the Supreme Court should intervene to protect him. Last week, the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Virginia ruled 2 to 1 that Risen must respond to a subpoena seeking his testimony in the trial of Jeffrey Sterling.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Nate Silver, the statistician/blogger whose profile rose considerably during the run-up to the 2012 presidential election, is leaving the New York Times for a job at ESPN that will return him, in part, to his sports roots.  Silver's blog FiveThirtyEight is moving to Walt Disney Co.'s ESPN from the Times, which has been his outlet since 2010. Silver, who got his start analyzing baseball stats, will build a team to cover sports and politics, as well as topics such as economics, culture, science and technology.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Critics were quick to call President Obama a “race-baiter” after he addressed the nation Friday about Trayvon Martin's killing and what it's like for young black males in this country who, he said, “are painted with a broad brush.” “You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot, I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago,” Obama said, reflecting on how he...
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
President Obama joined the national conversation on race Friday, addressing the death of Trayvon Martin, the slain Florida teenager whose main offense seems to have been his skin color. After a week of protests in the wake of shooter George Zimmerman's acquittal, some of which lamentably turned violent , Obama spoke of the pain felt in the African American community. “I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that - that doesn't go away,” the president said.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Broccoli is having a big news week, which is kind of odd given that it is out of season. But I suppose it's better to have it happen at an inopportune time than never at all -- particularly for this most maligned of vegetables. On Tuesday, President Obama declared his affection for broccoli, dropping it as a side comment when doing an appearance promoting nutrition with a bunch of school kids. This, of course, spawned a raft of broccoli-pondering among the Beltway commentariat ("Obama's Broccoli Claim Reopens Washington Debate" was the headline on a Wall Street Journal blog -- seriously)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By David Ng
"I'll Eat You Last," John Logan's stage play starring Bette Midler as the late Hollywood talent agent Sue Mengers, recently closed up shop on Broadway after a profitable run at the Booth Theatre. Now there's speculation that the one-woman show is destined for Los Angeles, though there has been no official confirmation. Midler told the New York Times in an interview published this week that producers are considering taking the play to L.A. A publicist for the New York production of "I'll Eat You Last" said that its producers had no comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2013 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
After Philip Slater published "The Pursuit of Loneliness," a 1970 best-seller that delivered a blistering critique of American culture, he moved to California and adopted a lifestyle aimed at avoiding the fate of the fellow citizens he saw as so unhappy. "Pursuit" argued that despite widespread influence and prosperity Americans were overwhelmingly dissatisfied. A key reason for that, he said, was a collective obsession with the success of the individual. The book established him as a social critic and set up a future for Slater as an academic.
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