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BUSINESS
November 10, 1994
For trade and commerce, this tiny country of about 3.5 million people has traditionally dependent on Australia and Britain, from which it gained independence in 1947. It recently began expanding its reach, aggressively seeking trade ties with and investment from North America and the booming Asian countries. The Economy In the late 1980s and early 90s, New Zealand experienced its worst recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cross-Island Ferry Workers Notified of Lockout: New Zealand Rail Ltd. said it is issuing notices to Cook Strait ferry workers that they will be barred from coming to work June 27 unless maritime unions agree to new work provisions. The company runs ferries between New Zealand's North and South islands. The lockout notices follow the breakdown of talks with maritime unions over labor conditions.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cross-Island Ferry Workers Notified of Lockout: New Zealand Rail Ltd. said it is issuing notices to Cook Strait ferry workers that they will be barred from coming to work June 27 unless maritime unions agree to new work provisions. The company runs ferries between New Zealand's North and South islands. The lockout notices follow the breakdown of talks with maritime unions over labor conditions.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1994
For trade and commerce, this tiny country of about 3.5 million people has traditionally dependent on Australia and Britain, from which it gained independence in 1947. It recently began expanding its reach, aggressively seeking trade ties with and investment from North America and the booming Asian countries. The Economy In the late 1980s and early 90s, New Zealand experienced its worst recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s.
NEWS
January 25, 1985 | From Reuters
New Zealand will not change its policy banning nuclear ships despite "friendly persuasion" from allies Australia and the United States, acting Prime Minister Geoffrey Palmer said today. In a letter released today, Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke called on New Zealand Prime Minister David Lange to drop his insistence that the United States must declare whether its Navy ships are carrying nuclear weapons.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Voters booted out New Zealand's Labor Party on Saturday, humiliating Prime Minister Mike Moore and giving the opposition National Party the biggest election victory in more than half a century. Labor's rout after six turbulent years in power was just the disaster that Moore had promised to avert when he took the party leadership from Geoffrey Palmer only eight weeks ago. "It was a very short honeymoon. Not even a one-night stand, was it?" a crestfallen Moore said after conceding defeat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1985
The United States and New Zealand are old friends. To speak of a "crisis" in U.S. relations with New Zealand is shocking. Yet there is one, precipitated by the refusal by New Zealand's Labor government to allow visits by a U.S. warship that might be carrying nuclear arms. Even with delicate handling, a 33-year-old treaty may wind up on the scrap heap. The ANZUS treaty links Australia, New Zealand and the United States in a common defense of the South Pacific area.
NEWS
March 5, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Bob Hawke on Monday indefinitely postponed the scheduled annual meeting of the Australia-New Zealand-United States defense alliance because New Zealand bars from its ports any U.S. Navy ship capable of carrying nuclear arms. Hawke made the announcement after a meeting of his Cabinet, saying that the 33-year-old alliance, known as ANZUS, has ceased to function and that "insofar as ANZUS is a trilateral relationship, virtually nothing of it is operative now."
NEWS
July 15, 1985 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Australia conferred today on South Pacific security matters, with New Zealand absent for the first time in decades as the ANZUS alliance of the three nations continues to fray and as Soviet activity in the region increases. Issues being discussed by Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federico Cuello Camilo arrived here last week hoping to squeeze open a few more doors for bananas, sugar and clothing bearing the "Made in the Dominican Republic" label. Instead, the 33-year-old Geneva-based ambassador from that poor Caribbean country became part of a Third World rebellion that helped bring the World Trade Organization summit to an abrupt and embarrassing halt.
NEWS
February 6, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government Tuesday called off scheduled naval maneuvers with Australia and New Zealand to protest New Zealand's refusal to permit a visit by a U.S. warship and, perhaps more important, to signal to other allies that the United States will respond to anti-nuclear gestures. "Some Western countries have anti-nuclear and other movements which seek to diminish defense cooperation among the allied states," State Department spokesman Bernard Kalb said.
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