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BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Remember when Wall Street was gaga over Google? Despite its quirky approach to business, Google Inc. became a favorite among investors as the company best positioned to cash in on the digital media revolution. The Internet search giant's shares first hit the market at $85 in August 2004 and had risen nearly ninefold by late last year, turning Google into one of America's most valuable companies. But since reaching a record $741.79 in November, Google's stock price has plunged 40%. The company, which only a few months ago could do no wrong, saw its stock slip $12.42, or nearly 3%, Tuesday to $444.60, its lowest point in nearly a year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | Meghan Daum
More than 15 years after fabricating some 42 articles for the New Republic, Rolling Stone and other magazines, Stephen Glass was back in the news this week. On Monday, the California Supreme Court ruled that Glass, 41, does not have the moral character "critical to the practice of law. " He has been trying for a decade to overcome that hurdle. He's certainly qualified otherwise. Glass graduated from Georgetown Law School in 2000, passed bar exams in New York and California, and has worked for years as a paralegal at a Beverly Hills firm.
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NATIONAL
February 8, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
Would you be willing to kick in $20 to have someone get to the bottom of the murky finances at your kid's school? How about contributing $30 to find out if your trash haulers really sift recyclables from the garbage, like they claim? If that sounds intriguing, I give you David Cohn. Cohn is a skinny young man of abundant enthusiasm who's primed to pump energy, and cash, into what sometimes feels like the world's most beleaguered profession: journalism. He is the founder of Spot.
OPINION
February 14, 2011
Just don't block traffic Re "Political protesters may face jail time in L.A. " Feb. 11 Protesters have the right to march on sidewalks and public places so long as they do not block traffic or cause a public nuisance. The protesters in your article knew they were doing something against the law. Why are they now alarmed at the consequences? I am personally irritated when protesters block traffic for hours on Wilshire Boulevard. Why can't they get a permit and do it lawfully?
BUSINESS
May 28, 2009 | Patrick J. McDonnell
Starbucks a hub of union-busting and worker exploitation? Say it ain't so, Howard Schultz! The Starbucks chief executive, who actively cultivates a socially progressive image, is in the cross hairs of a new-media campaign designed to bolster union representation at the retail giant and beyond. For five years, Starbucks has been the target of a limited but sometimes nasty unionization drive that has tarnished its reputation for high-minded benevolence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2000
The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences' Seminars Committee will host "Is There a Dot Com in Your Future?" The April 6 panel discussion will feature new-media and broadcast executives discussing career options in today's entertainment environment. The panel, scheduled for 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., will take place at the academy's Leonard H. Goldenson Theatre, 5230 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. Admission is $15. Information: (818) 754-2890.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2001
Are industry-specific regional clusters good or bad for the communities that host them? The Westside Urban Forum takes up that issue Friday at a time when the large concentration of new-media companies west of La Cienega Boulevard faces its fledgling industry's first major retrenchment. Could the Westside suffer as much from industrywide restructuring in the new-media sector as the South Bay did during the pullback of the aerospace industry in the early 1990s?
BUSINESS
June 23, 1994 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
To evoke a catty chorus of multimedia meows, just ask the East Coast intelligentsia or West Coast pop culture artistes to predict where tomorrow's new-media capital will be. In between bites of kappa maki and deal making, Angelenos will insist that their fingers are firmly pressed on the jugular of pop culture and that all multimedia superhighways inevitably lead to Hollywood. The New Yorkers argue that information is the key and that the multimedia future looks just like publishing.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1998 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to help ease a talent crunch in Southern California's burgeoning new-media industry, Santa Monica College is set to unveil Tuesday a new academy designed to train students for careers in computer animation, special effects and other digital jobs in high demand. Dubbed the Academy of Entertainment & Technology, the two-year program is the most extensive of its kind among community colleges, administrators say. It is housed in a new center that has been outfitted with $2.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
Signaling the importance of building its Internet presence, Time Warner has appointed a second high-level executive to its new-media group. William Burke, president of TBS Superstation and Turner South, was named president and chief executive of news and information of Time Warner Digital Media. Burke will report to Richard Bressler, the former chief financial officer of Time Warner who was named chairman and chief executive of the new group in June.
NEWS
November 1, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
The host of "American Idol" will be fielding a last-minute appeal for votes from President Obama in the latest intermingling of pop culture and politics. An interview with Ryan Seacrest is one of several on Obama's call sheet on this day before the midterm elections. After a series of campaign appearances across the country, including four over the weekend, Obama had no public events on his schedule Monday. Obama also was set to speak with Russ Parr, Michael Baisden and Steve Harvey, calls targeted to reach radio listeners across the country to encourage key constituencies to vote for Democratic candidates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | James Rainey
The great thing about the wide-open space of the Web is that it's accepted practice -- encouraged really -- for anyone to walk in many worlds and take on many guises. Rock stars can blog about politics. Politicians can thrill us with lists of their favorite rock songs. And the Huffington Post can create a new book section that both doubts and embraces the value of book reviews. In recent days, founder Arianna Huffington trumpeted a partnership with the New York Review of Books, that redoubt of serious criticism, just about the time the website's new book editor seemed to disdain reviews, which she said "tend to be conversation enders."
BUSINESS
May 28, 2009 | Patrick J. McDonnell
Starbucks a hub of union-busting and worker exploitation? Say it ain't so, Howard Schultz! The Starbucks chief executive, who actively cultivates a socially progressive image, is in the cross hairs of a new-media campaign designed to bolster union representation at the retail giant and beyond. For five years, Starbucks has been the target of a limited but sometimes nasty unionization drive that has tarnished its reputation for high-minded benevolence.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
The girl's voice in the videotape is tiny and tentative. She is talking to a nursing aide in a Planned Parenthood clinic in Bloomington, Ind. The girl wants an abortion. The aide explains that the girl will need a parent's consent because she is only 13. The girl balks; she does not want to name the father. "Cause, I mean, he would be in really big trouble," says the girl. Her boyfriend, she explains, is 31. The aide drops her head into her hands.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
Would you be willing to kick in $20 to have someone get to the bottom of the murky finances at your kid's school? How about contributing $30 to find out if your trash haulers really sift recyclables from the garbage, like they claim? If that sounds intriguing, I give you David Cohn. Cohn is a skinny young man of abundant enthusiasm who's primed to pump energy, and cash, into what sometimes feels like the world's most beleaguered profession: journalism. He is the founder of Spot.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Remember when Wall Street was gaga over Google? Despite its quirky approach to business, Google Inc. became a favorite among investors as the company best positioned to cash in on the digital media revolution. The Internet search giant's shares first hit the market at $85 in August 2004 and had risen nearly ninefold by late last year, turning Google into one of America's most valuable companies. But since reaching a record $741.79 in November, Google's stock price has plunged 40%. The company, which only a few months ago could do no wrong, saw its stock slip $12.42, or nearly 3%, Tuesday to $444.60, its lowest point in nearly a year.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
Continuing the consolidation of local new-media firms, Beverly Hills-based Digital Planet and Spin Cycle Entertainment of Los Angeles are expected to announce today that they will merge with BoxTop/iXL. The combined office, to be renamed iXL-Los Angeles, will be one of the biggest interactive firms on the Digital Coast, with more than 150 employees. The company did not reveal financial terms of the deal.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1995 | JONATHAN WEBER, Jonathan Weber is assistant business editor for technology at The Times
In the new-media industry, that ill-defined collection of CD-ROM developers, cutting edge musicians, Internet aficionados and others who are pushing the bounds of new technology, people like to talk about art. New types of software or new electronic publishing techniques or new ways of tying computers together are seen as a means of creative expression, as new palettes for digital Picassos. And that's all well and good, even laudable to a certain extent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2006 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
IN the late 1980s, Pamela Kramlich saw a work of video art by Peter Fischli and David Weiss titled "The Way Things Go." The 30-minute piece shows a perpetual-motion machine built by the artists: A car propelled by a kind of firecracker bumps into a bowling ball, which hits a piece of cardboard, which somehow leads to the ignition of a flammable substance in a saucepot -- and on and on. Kramlich loved it.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2005 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
When the Corp. for Public Broadcasting announced in the spring the launch of an ambitious program aimed at expanding middle- and high-school students' knowledge of U.S. history and civics, it seemed to fit squarely with its traditional public service mission.
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