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Newport Inglewood Fault

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NEWS
October 19, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Newport-Inglewood fault isn't nearly as famous as the mighty San Andreas, but it poses such a severe threat to the Southern California coast that even a mild quake sends shivers up the spines of emergency officials. The fault cuts a subterranean path from Beverly Hills to Newport Beach--directly underneath a densely populated coastline that sits precariously on sandy soils vulnerable to motion. South of Newport Beach the fault veers offshore.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2012 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The two earthquakes that struck Beverly Hills and shook a good portion of Los Angeles this week occurred at the intersection of two dangerous faults. Although both faults are capable of producing a 7.0 temblor, experts said the quakes are probably not foreshocks to a larger quake. U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Doug Given said the quakes occurred near the junction of the Santa Monica fault, which runs underneath Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Westwood and Beverly Hills, and the Newport-Inglewood fault, which produced the deadly 1933 Long Beach quake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the regulars who frequent Paula's palm, Tarot-card and psychic readings shop in Sunset Beach came a single recurring question in the last few days: "When will the Big One come?" It's a question that even Paula--a woman who does her futuristic gazing from a two-room shop that sits virtually atop one of the area's most potentially destructive fault lines--dares not touch. "That's God's business. I don't mess around with predictions like that," she says. "There's not much you can do about it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
The northern portion of the Newport-Inglewood fault, which appeared to rupture in Sunday's magnitude 4.7 quake, is believed to be less prone to large, destructive earthquakes than the fault's southern portion, USC professor James Dolan said Monday. The Newport-Inglewood fault, counting its southern continuation, known as the Rose Canyon fault, is about 150 miles long and runs from Baldwin Hills to the Mexican border.
NEWS
November 5, 1989
This map and the one on the following two pages are from earthquake scenarios drawn up by the state Division of Mines and Geology. The first, prepared in 1988, shows in general terms what might occur in various areas if there was a 7.0-magnitude quake in the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone in Los Angeles and Orange counties. The second, drawn up in 1982, examines the possible impact of an 8.3-magnitude earthquake on the San Andreas Fault near Tejon.
MAGAZINE
November 29, 1987
"It is believed . . . that the assumption of a magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the Newport-Inglewood fault represents a reasonable upper limit for earthquakes in the Los Angeles basin." --A STUDY OF EARTHQUAKE LOSSES IN THE LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA AREA, BY THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION WHAT, REALLY, IS "the big one"? Most Southern Californians assume that it will come rolling out of the northeast, from the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale.
NEWS
October 27, 1989
Thank you for your expose on the dangers of the Newport-Inglewood Fault, in comparison to the San Andreas Fault. I only wish the Seal Beach City Council would take notice of your research. It's important for the people of Seal Beach to understand the valuable information you provided, such as the comparison with the San Andreas, and notice that a "sizeably smaller temblor on the Newport-Inglewood Fault could produce the same catastrophic results. The reason is location. . . . Its potential for destruction should it shake or shift is unarguable, experts say. The fault encompasses some of the most intensely developed neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2001
"The Battle Over Hawthorne Airport" (Oct. 29), placed next to "3.7 Quake Produces Brief but Heavy Jolt" near the Newport-Inglewood fault, should remind everyone what critical and important roles our general aviation airports play in emergencies. Southern California is earthquake country, and if streets and freeways in the Hawthorne area and the South Bay were damaged, that airport would be invaluable in getting help into and out of the area and to LAX itself. Harriett Porch Laguna Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2004 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
Seismic hazard maps issued by the state may underestimate the quake risk in Orange County and should be reevaluated in light of evidence that significant faults are hidden underground, according to two UC Irvine researchers. So-called blind thrust faults, which do not reach the surface, are buried under the Puente Hills, the San Joaquin Hills and probably the Santa Ana Mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2001
"The Battle Over Hawthorne Airport" (Oct. 29), placed next to "3.7 Quake Produces Brief but Heavy Jolt" near the Newport-Inglewood fault, should remind everyone what critical and important roles our general aviation airports play in emergencies. Southern California is earthquake country, and if streets and freeways in the Hawthorne area and the South Bay were damaged, that airport would be invaluable in getting help into and out of the area and to LAX itself. Harriett Porch Laguna Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday's 4.2 earthquake that shook large parts of Los Angeles appears to have involved the north end of the Newport-Inglewood fault, one of the most dangerous in Southern California, three leading quake scientists said Monday.
NEWS
November 9, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers have increased their estimates of losses from a prospective magnitude 7.0 earthquake on the Newport-Inglewood Fault in Los Angeles and Orange counties, substantially raising the predicted number of deaths and the amount of damages. Instead of the previously estimated 2,000 to 5,000 deaths released last year, the researchers from Stanford University and the quake mitigation firm of Risk Management Solutions now see 3,000 to 8,000 fatalities.
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | SAMANTHA DUNN
The City Council will hear citizen comments May 24 on a proposal to permit exploratory oil drilling on a one-acre plot that falls within a special cemetery zone. The council had approved the drilling at 7715 S. Victoria Ave. in December, 1992, but the decision was overturned by a U.S. Superior Court ruling that the city had not considered potential earthquake problems. The active Newport-Inglewood Fault runs through the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1994
I am an ecologist, so I suppose that that makes me immediately suspect. I am also a geologist and a marine biologist. I have been in and around the Bolsa Chica wetlands since the 1930s. If we ignore all of the ecological reasons not to build on the Bolsa Chica property there are still better reasons to restore the whole property to wetlands. I lived in Compton in 1933, the last time there was a major quake on the Newport-Inglewood fault. When you decide to build 4,000 homes on the Bolsa Chica property, you would do well to look at the trace of the Newport-Inglewood Fault.
MAGAZINE
January 17, 1988
As a student in a high school in Culver City, I was surprised to find out that my school was situated right on the Newport-Inglewood Fault. Before reading the article I had only been familiar with the San Andreas Fault. Therefore, I had no idea how drastically I would be affected if the big one hit. This is the kind of factual information that should be published, not the exaggerated speculation that was printed as a result of October's earthquake. ZOXANDER OSEI-FRIMPONG Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
January 10, 1988
Your fictional account of the first hours after a 7.5 magnitude earthquake on the Newport-Inglewood Fault, "The Bigger One" (Nov. 29), presented what is, unfortunately, an all-too-plausible scenario. By Dec. 3, your article had led more than 3,000 Southern California residents to write our Southern California Earthquake Preparedness Project. In cooperation with the Los Angeles chapter of the American Red Cross, the Governor's Office of Emergency Services is responding to each of these requests with a comprehensive family and home preparedness guide.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
According to Mark Johnson's personal seismic meter--a stairwell chandelier that smashed against a window in his home during Monday's violent earthquake--the 4:31 a.m. temblor was the strongest he has experienced in four years in Orange County.
NEWS
December 13, 1992
Both The Times and Nelson Rising of Maguire Thomas Partners would have everyone believe that the monstrous Playa Vista project is well-received because there was a lack of opposition to the environmental impact report at a recent public hearing (Times, Dec. 6). Your article did not mention the fact that anyone wishing to speak against the project at the hearing had to have read the 2,000-page environmental impact report. Most of the residents surrounding the project are working people and do not have the time to do so, and were thus silenced.
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