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NATIONAL
March 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Jurors in the perjury trial of ex-White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby expect to deliberate into next week. They asked U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton for a dictionary and more office supplies and asked to leave early today for the weekend. Walton denied the request for the dictionary but told jurors they could take off at 2 p.m. "So I assume they will not have a verdict tomorrow either," Walton told lawyers Thursday as jurors finished their seventh day of deliberations.
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NATIONAL
March 1, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The jury weighing the perjury case against I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby began a second week of deliberations Wednesday after sending a note to the judge raising a question about one of the charges against the former vice presidential aide. The note, sent to U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton on Tuesday night, was the first substantive communication from the jurors since they began deliberations last week, and it fueled speculation that they were making progress.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A jury adjourned after a fifth day of deliberations without reaching a verdict in the perjury trial of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. The former White House aide is accused of obstructing an investigation tied to the Iraq war.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Jurors deliberated a third day without reaching a verdict on whether former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby obstructed the investigation into who leaked the identity of a CIA operative married to a prominent Iraq war critic. After daylong deliberations, the eight women and four men went home until Monday.
NATIONAL
February 23, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A jury ended its second day of deliberations without reaching a verdict in the perjury trial of former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. The jury of eight women and four men has spent about 12 hours considering whether Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff lied to investigators as they sought to determine who leaked the identity of CIA analyst Valerie Plame in 2003. Jurors were to resume deliberations today.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
After a month of testimony and a day of impassioned debate by the lawyers, a federal jury Wednesday began considering the perjury case against I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton instructed the jurors on the law underlying the five-count indictment against Libby, and urged them to use common sense in deliberations to determine whether Libby was guilty of an illegal coverup or of merely having a bad memory.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
At I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's perjury trial, his lawyers have argued that pressing matters of state prevented the former vice presidential chief of staff from accurately recalling events. But the question of Libby's guilt or innocence, which is expected to be in the hands of a federal jury today, may turn more on what he says he remembered, rather than what he says he forgot.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
In his opening statement three weeks ago in the federal perjury trial of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, defense lawyer Theodore V. Wells Jr. dropped a bombshell. In dramatic tones, Wells declared that Libby had been the victim of a White House conspiracy to make Libby the fall guy for the CIA leak scandal. But when the jury begins deliberating the fate of the former vice presidential aide next week, it will have seen virtually no evidence to back up the provocative claim.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's decision not to testify in his perjury case damaged a key part of his defense Wednesday, when a federal judge ruled that his lawyers could not introduce once-classified details of his workload without Libby taking the witness stand. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton was one of two setbacks for the defense as it finished presenting evidence in the case without calling any additional witnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2007 | Joe Mozingo and Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writers
A defense attorney in the BALCO steroid scandal has admitted that he revealed secret grand jury testimony from Major League Baseball players to two San Francisco Chronicle reporters, ending a constitutional standoff between federal prosecutors and the press, and eliminating the threat of prison for the journalists.
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