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NEWS
March 3, 1987
Polish police raided the apartment of opposition activist Jacek Kuron to break up a news conference for Western reporters about political repression in Poland. Kuron was warned he will face a misdemeanor court for hosting the 11 Western journalists. Police detained Zbigniew Rmaszewski, a senior adviser to the outlawed Solidarity labor movement, but released him after an hour of questioning.
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NEWS
May 23, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark case against Polish press freedoms, a Warsaw district court ruled Monday that journalists can be punished for libel even if they have made good-faith efforts to research and document allegations against public figures.
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NEWS
September 24, 1989
For the first time since World War II, Poland's Communist Party is not in control of the nation's broadcast media, as Solidarity journalist Andrzej Drawicz was named to run the state-owned television and radio networks. Drawicz, 57, a specialist in Soviet affairs and a former political prisoner, was named by Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki. The choice to head the broadcast media was the major remaining question mark in Mazowiecki's government.
SPORTS
January 30, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY
In Poland, television viewers generally did not have access to any Super Bowl broadcast, but a few newspapers wrote about the imminent game as a strange American phenomenon. "In Super America, every Super American--and surely every Superman--watches the Super Bowl," reported Zycie, a leading daily newspaper.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark case against Polish press freedoms, a Warsaw district court ruled Monday that journalists can be punished for libel even if they have made good-faith efforts to research and document allegations against public figures.
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty stories above the Oder River, whose ravenous waters have been devouring this weary Silesian city for nearly two weeks, sits an exhausted man in a camouflage vest tending a mug of nasty-looking coffee. Jacek Scioblowski's office is about the size of a walk-in closet. The floor is a jumble of wading boots and discarded rain gear. The ashtray desperately needs emptying, and cellular telephones are recharging in every outlet.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From United Press International
The government on Friday gave Solidarity the right to publish its own daily and weekly newspapers but refused to grant the banned union's demand for access to state-owned television. Representatives at the 4-week-old Solidarity-government talks, however, made progress on a formula for indexing wage increases. The two sides agreed on a level of 80% of the rate of inflation, which exceeded 60% in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
A press officer for Poland's new Solidarity-led government had just finished giving his first briefing to the news media last year when several local reporters followed him back to his office. "What are we supposed to write? What were the most important points?" they asked the official, who was shocked to encounter such a subservient press corps. While the Communist lock on political power in Poland has ended, the journalistic practices associated with the regime have not.
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty stories above the Oder River, whose ravenous waters have been devouring this weary Silesian city for nearly two weeks, sits an exhausted man in a camouflage vest tending a mug of nasty-looking coffee. Jacek Scioblowski's office is about the size of a walk-in closet. The floor is a jumble of wading boots and discarded rain gear. The ashtray desperately needs emptying, and cellular telephones are recharging in every outlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
A press officer for Poland's new Solidarity-led government had just finished giving his first briefing to the news media last year when several local reporters followed him back to his office. "What are we supposed to write? What were the most important points?" they asked the official, who was shocked to encounter such a subservient press corps. While the Communist lock on political power in Poland has ended, the journalistic practices associated with the regime have not.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From United Press International
The government on Friday gave Solidarity the right to publish its own daily and weekly newspapers but refused to grant the banned union's demand for access to state-owned television. Representatives at the 4-week-old Solidarity-government talks, however, made progress on a formula for indexing wage increases. The two sides agreed on a level of 80% of the rate of inflation, which exceeded 60% in 1988.
NEWS
March 3, 1987
Polish police raided the apartment of opposition activist Jacek Kuron to break up a news conference for Western reporters about political repression in Poland. Kuron was warned he will face a misdemeanor court for hosting the 11 Western journalists. Police detained Zbigniew Rmaszewski, a senior adviser to the outlawed Solidarity labor movement, but released him after an hour of questioning.
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