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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
An ordinance aimed at giving El Segundo greater control over news racks on public property was approved Tuesday by the City Council. The measure will not force removal of existing news racks, but it limits locations of future racks, officials said. According to a city survey, El Segundo has 59 news-rack locations with a total of 267 racks--205 of them on public property. The measure, updating an existing ordinance, takes effect in a month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 6, 2008 | James Rainey, Rainey is a Times staff writer.
Apparently looking for something old to go with something new (Barack Obama) and something blue (a more Democratic Congress), the American people bought newspapers in huge numbers Wednesday, a day after the historic election of the nation's first black president. From the nation's largest daily, USA Today, to its more modest broadsheets, newspapers expanded press runs to accommodate enormous sales. Some papers even sold special gift editions and framed front pages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council advanced a proposal Wednesday to regulate the placement and color of news racks throughout the city, setting the ordinance for final approval next week. A majority of the council is concerned that the 35,000 news racks on Los Angeles sidewalks are creating blight, with racks of many colors clustered chaotically around the front doors of businesses.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Times, Paramount Pictures and the advertising company whose "Mission: Impossible III" promotional campaign prompted an evacuation of a Veterans Affairs hospital have finalized a settlement with the government, the U.S. Attorney's office in Los Angeles said Thursday. The paper, the studio and Allied Advertising agreed to pay $75,000 to settle the case but did not admit wrongdoing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990
The City Council on Monday approved an ordinance that requires permits for news racks on public rights of way and blinder racks for those containing sexually explicit materials. The ordinance, which will take effect in 90 days, also regulates the number, size, construction, placement and appearance of the racks. The city has had a ban on news racks on public rights of way since 1973, but it was not enforced until August, when Councilman Earl J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989
The City Council on Monday deadlocked on a measure that would have required permits for all news racks on sidewalks and opaque racks for sexually explicit materials. The council had tentatively approved the measure on Nov. 20 by a 3-0 vote with Councilmen Earl J. Prescott and John Kelly absent. On Monday, Prescott and Kelly said that they favor a ban on news racks on sidewalks. Mayor Richard B. Edgar and Mayor Pro Tem Ursula E. Kennedy supported the ordinance. Ronald B.
NEWS
November 12, 1987
The Downey City Council tentatively approved an ordinance Tuesday that would require news racks containing adult publications to be equipped with opaque covers. The council is expected to give final approval to the ordinance at its Nov. 24 meeting. The ordinance would take effect Jan. 1. The council acted in response to passage of Assembly Bill 711, which takes effect Jan. 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council voted Wednesday to tweak a proposed ordinance regulating news racks, which some council members complain are an eyesore. The proposed ordinance, which council members expect to approve in the fall, would limit the number of racks to 16 for every 200 feet and require all of them to be the same color: green. Officials estimate there are as many as 30,000 news racks on city sidewalks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council approved a plan Wednesday to regulate the placement and color of 35,000 news racks throughout the city. The law will limit racks to 16 for every 200 feet of sidewalk, set height and width limits, and require that all be ivy green.
NEWS
February 6, 1986
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled in favor of the city of Arcadia in a lawsuit brought by Paul and Eunice Duffy, owners of Kimbo Distributors, who placed double-deck news racks throughout the city in violation of a code requirement limiting the height of news racks to four feet. The city had been under a preliminary injunction forbidding it to enforce the height limit pending the outcome of the suit. City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Before Tom Cruise's "Mission: Impossible III" exploded last May across movie screens, its promotional campaign bombed on Los Angeles newsstands. That's the view of federal officials who say they intend to sue the Los Angeles Times and Paramount Pictures Corp. over the April 28 placement in news racks of digital devices that played the familiar "Mission: Impossible" theme song when the racks' doors were opened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2006 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
A newspaper promotion for the upcoming movie "Mission: Impossible III" misfired Friday when a Los Angeles County sheriff's arson squad blew up a news rack, thinking it contained a bomb. Instead, the Los Angeles Times coin machine near the intersection of Sand Canyon and Soledad Canyon roads in Santa Clarita held a digital musical device designed to play the "Mission: Impossible" theme song when the rack's door was opened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council approved a plan Wednesday to regulate the placement and color of 35,000 news racks throughout the city. The law will limit racks to 16 for every 200 feet of sidewalk, set height and width limits, and require that all be ivy green.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council advanced a proposal Wednesday to regulate the placement and color of news racks throughout the city, setting the ordinance for final approval next week. A majority of the council is concerned that the 35,000 news racks on Los Angeles sidewalks are creating blight, with racks of many colors clustered chaotically around the front doors of businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council voted Wednesday to tweak a proposed ordinance regulating news racks, which some council members complain are an eyesore. The proposed ordinance, which council members expect to approve in the fall, would limit the number of racks to 16 for every 200 feet and require all of them to be the same color: green. Officials estimate there are as many as 30,000 news racks on city sidewalks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2004 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Annoyed by the growing collection of news racks of various sizes and colors on Los Angeles sidewalks, the City Council on Wednesday took a step toward imposing new limits on the racks and requiring them all to be painted ivy-green. The proposed ordinance would limit the number of news racks to 16 for every 200 feet, set height and width limits and require that clusters contain no more than four racks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1989 | SHANNON SANDS
The City Council on Monday postponed a decision on regulating the distribution of news racks until Nov. 20, when it will compare three options. The council was scheduled to consider an ordinance prohibiting from public rights of way news racks containing pornographic material. This ordinance would also require permits for and regulate the appearance and location of all news racks on public rights of way. But City Atty. James G.
NEWS
October 13, 1991
At least 17 news racks were moved away from the San Dimas Post Office's entrance on Bonita Avenue because of numerous complaints from customers, a postal service official said. Office Supervisor Bill Munoz said that, over the last three months, at least two customers a day had complained about the growing number of news racks, especially ones containing sexually explicit materials. Last Wednesday, postal workers removed all the racks from the property and put them out on the sidewalk, he said.
NEWS
March 27, 2004 | Kerry Morrison and David Burg
Travel to cities such as Santa Barbara, Beverly Hills or Culver City and you'll see tasteful sidewalk amenities such as benches, bike racks and news racks. In these communities, the sidewalk landscape is pleasing to the eye and one gains a sense that there is order in the city. In Los Angeles, we are moving toward reclaiming this order within our city limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2003 | Kathleen Flynn, Times Staff Writer
Zen Annino first noticed the multicolored metal boxes a few months ago on morning walks through her Studio City neighborhood. She counted 12 news racks outside Starbucks on the corner of Vantage Avenue and Ventura Boulevard, selling everything from the Wall Street Journal to the adult magazine Yank. Around the corner, six more. In total, Annino and her neighbors counted 159 news racks on a two-block stretch of Ventura Boulevard.
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