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WORLD
March 30, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The suicide bombs that roared through Moscow subway cars Monday were almost certainly the latest salvo in a slow-moving war of attrition between the Russian government and militants in the restive, mostly Muslim republics of the Caucasus. Vladimir Putin has been trading blows with southern rebels ever since he rose to the presidency a decade ago. At times, violence has threatened to erode the social contract he's struck with the Russian public: Forgo some democratic rights in exchange for, above all, stability.
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NATIONAL
January 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
  A shrunken field of GOP presidential hopefuls descended on New Hampshire on Wednesday, the next test in the party's nominating fight, as Mitt Romney sought to bolster his status as front-runner and establishment favorite. A day after winning the Iowa caucuses by the slimmest margin in history - eight votes - Romney signaled that party ranks were closing and used a morning TV interview to contrast the breadth and strength of his campaign with the hand-to-mouth candidacy of Rick Santorum, Iowa's runner-up.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - On the first day of the federal government shutdown, Republican leaders shucked their jackets, sat at a conference table and faced empty chairs - and cameras - to show that Democrats wouldn't negotiate. With the shutdown in its fourth day, President Obama, also sans jacket with his sleeves rolled up, strolled from the White House to a sub shop, where he praised its 10% discount for furloughed workers. Political theater is at an all-time high as both parties seek to outdo each other with more elaborate and showy news events, even as there is little legislating or even backroom negotiating underway to end the stalemate.
WORLD
November 23, 2009 | By Janet Stobart
Rain and wind that swept over Britain during the weekend eased enough Monday to allow residents forced out by flooding to return and assess the damage -- and prepare for new storms forecast for the next few days. The waves of bad weather that drenched parts of England, Wales and Scotland caused at least two deaths and widespread damage. Residents in heavily stricken areas watched as their houses and businesses flooded, bridges collapsed into swollen rivers and rising waters cut off roads and railways.
WORLD
December 14, 2009 | By Ramin Mostaghim
Three Americans arrested while hiking along the Iran-Iraq border last summer will soon be put on trial, Iranian Foreign Minister Manoucher Mottaki said, accusing them of "dubious intent." U.S. citizens Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal and Sarah Shourd, all living in or visiting the Middle East, were arrested July 31 during what friends and family describe as a travel adventure in the picturesque mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan, which abuts Iran. A friend who was with them said they may have accidentally strayed across the Iranian border.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2010 | By Andrew Malcolm
Good thing the ballot choices for the Nov. 2 national midterm elections don't include "None of the Above. " Or voters would turn Congress upside down. That's because a new Gallup poll out Wednesday finds barely one in three Americans approve of the job being done in Congress by either party — 32% approval for Republicans and 33% for Democrats. Gallup finds the parties' ratings near the low end of what they've been historically — the 30% bottom for Democrats in December 2007, 11 months after they took control of both houses; and the 25% for Republicans in December 2008 at the end of you-know-who's eight years of policies.
WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Usama Redha
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's slate had an early lead Saturday as partial results trickled in from the parliamentary elections last weekend. With 10% to 30% of the vote counted in 11 of Iraq's 18 provinces, Maliki's State of Law slate was winning in Baghdad and four southern provinces, Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission reported. But his lead could easily be wiped away, with final election results expected to take at least a month to certify. State of Law, which bills itself as nonsectarian, had predicted it would win 100 seats in the 325-member parliament, taking Baghdad and Iraq's nine southern provinces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher
For the fourth straight month, California has collected more in taxes than expected, a sign that the state economy may be starting to recover. But finance officials warned that any rebound is expected to be slow, and the revenue boon may prove less helpful at shrinking California's deficit than many in Sacramento hope. State revenue outpaced forecasts by $356 million in March, according to a report issued Thursday by the state controller. For the current fiscal year, California's tax collections have topped budget projections by $2.3 billion, or 4.1%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Hoping to get business interests to support a tax extension, Democratic lawmakers moved Wednesday to address a major grievance of the private sector by stripping outdated, unnecessary rules from California's 28,000 pages of regulations. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg of Sacramento and two other legislators announced a proposal that would have state agencies review their regulations and recommend those to be stricken. The measure also would create a one-stop permitting process for businesses.
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