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NEWS
June 17, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Company newsletters remain strategic communication tools, even in this age of e-mail, intranets and instant messages. That's what Porsche North America's management concluded after exploring ways to build a stronger corporate culture. The auto maker (whose parent is in Stuttgart, Germany) moved its headquarters in 1998 from Reno to Atlanta. Thirty-five employees made the move; 100 remained in field locations throughout the U.S. An additional 75 workers were hired at the new office.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Cartoons mocking Latino and Asian bus riders have appeared in recent editions of an RTD-produced, in-house newsletter, prompting complaints from at least one Latino driver and embarrassing management officials as they try to attract more minority riders. One of the comics, which appeared in a newsletter for employees at a downtown division, shows a skeleton-like, serape-and-sombrero-garbed rider wasting away at a stop as he waits for a bus to arrive on an East Los Angeles route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Councilman John E. Noyes Jr. has his way, everyone in the city will be better informed and feel more in touch with the city. On Monday, the City Council will consider Noyes' request to fund a quarterly city newsletter. "It would be something kind of homey," said Noyes. In addition to keeping residents updated on major city projects, Noyes said he hopes to introduce the community to some of the city's employees. City staff members say the newsletter would cost $9,582 annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
After an absence of about three years, city government will resume issuing a periodic newsletter to residents this summer. The City Council voted this week to restore the newsletter, combining it with the existing park and recreation brochure. City staff estimated the cost of the combined newsletter and brochure will be about $43,000, with the park district paying $34,400 and the city paying $8,600.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
To answer residents' questions about the 18-year, $55-million street improvement program to repair the worst roads in town, the city is putting together a newsletter that will be out early next week. The letter will give details of the program, approved in July, including how it is being financed, the status of street repairs and how roads are being reconstructed.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newsletter editor Douglas Fabian said Thursday that he and his subscribers are the victims of "blatant discrimination" by the Fidelity Group, the nation's largest mutual-fund company. Fabian, who produces the Telephone Switch Newsletter, made the allegation in a letter sent to his 45,000 subscribers.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
American Airlines, the giant of the U.S. air travel industry, is trying to stop a tiny newsletter from publishing information about discount fares for people going to conventions and trade shows. American says in a federal lawsuit that Travel Confidential helps travelers commit fraud. Travel Confidential Publisher Paul L. Edwards counters that he is merely collecting and distributing public information. The suit in U.S.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Business executives, bank officers, lawyers, real estate brokers and even car dealers have been drafted into the war on drugs--whether they like it or not. Armed with stiff new regulations passed under the Bank Secrecy Act of 1988, the IRS and other federal agencies are forcing businesses and financial institutions to help track the estimated $220 million in profits generated daily by illegal drug sales in this country. "All that cash does no good stored in boxes. They have to turn it around.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1993 | RICHARD CORE
In its first year of publication, the city newsletter has won second place in a national competition. The City-County-Communications and Marketing Assn. gave the award to the city recently at its national conference in Washington, said Don White, city administrative services director. Laguna Hills competed in the special publications category for cities under 50,000 population.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
Ed Mauss isn't ashamed to say he's a bumbler, and he wants fellow sufferers to know they're not alone. Mauss began publishing the Hard Luck Gazette newsletter last August and has since regaled its 100-odd subscribers with tales of hapless people. "People like knowing they're not the only ones," Mauss said. If the pages of the Gazette are any indication, they have plenty of company. Like the man who, while traveling on the Australian outback, hit a kangaroo with his Jeep.
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