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SPORTS
March 10, 2007 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
The NCAA tournament selection committee has been sequestered on the 15th floor of the Indianapolis Westin since Wednesday night, with a security guard on duty. Friday morning, Appalachian State found a way inside, paying $10,000 for a full page ad in the Indianapolis Star touting the barely on-the-bubble Mountaineers' NCAA tournament credentials. "Stating our case," it read.
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WORLD
November 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A violent Mexican drug gang took out a half-page newspaper ad in which it claimed to be an anti-crime vigilante group seeking to stop kidnapping, robbery and the sale of methamphetamine in the western state of Michoacan. The Family, a shadowy group believed to be allied with Mexico's Gulf drug cartel, has claimed responsibility for bloody killings, such as a Sept. 6 attack in which gunmen dumped five human heads into a bar in the Michoacan city of Uruapan.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2006 | From Reuters
Combined print and online advertising revenue at U.S. newspapers slid 1.5% to $11.8 billion in the third quarter, hurt by falling automobile and help-wanted classified sales, an industry group said Tuesday. The decline marks the first time that combined print and online spending fell since the Newspaper Assn. of America began measuring such revenue in 2004.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Newspaper publisher Knight Ridder Inc., which is being sold to McClatchy Co., posted sharply lower first-quarter earnings Monday on weaker advertising -- particularly at three of the 12 newspapers McClatchy is not keeping -- and factors including higher interest costs. San Jose-based Knight Ridder earned $28.4 million, or 42 cents a share, in the first three months of the year, down from $60.5 million, or 79 cents, a year earlier.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2005 | Meg James
Newspapers saw increases in classified advertising as well as ads on their websites, according to preliminary estimates by the Newspaper Assn. of America. Ad spending for newspapers, including their websites, inched up 2.4% to $12 billion for the third quarter of 2005 when compared with the year-earlier quarter. Spending for print ads was up 1.6% to $11.4 billion compared with the third quarter of 2004. Classified ad spending was up 5.5%.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bestselling American crime writer Patricia Cornwell has taken out full-page newspaper ads to defend her investigation into solving a 19th century killing spree. The ads in two British national newspapers on Saturday came days after one of the papers accused her of having an "obsession" with the Jack the Ripper case.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
General Motors Corp. has resumed corporate advertising in the Los Angeles Times more than three months after withdrawing its ads from the paper in a dispute over coverage of the company. GM pulled its ads in April after a column by Times automotive critic Dan Neil called on the automaker to oust Chief Executive Rick Wagoner. At the time, GM executives said they had concerns beyond Neil's column but declined to publicly air them.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2004 | From Reuters
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., hurt by sluggish sales over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, launched a rare advertising blitz in newspapers across the United States touting price cuts. The No. 1 U.S. retailer took out full-page color ads in newspapers in as many as 50 markets to promote price cuts of up to a third on such diverse products as portable DVD players, appliances, tools and Elmo toys. The ad campaign follows poor November sales reported by the retailer. Shares of Bentonville, Ark.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
In the first step of a statewide effort to polish its reputation, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. published a newspaper advertisement Thursday promoting its employment practices and promising to continue its expansion in California. The ad -- published as an open letter to the people of California in 15 newspapers statewide, including The Times -- was designed to counter recent criticism of the company's business practices, Wal-Mart said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2004 | Walter Hamilton and Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writers
When Martha Stewart's criminal trial dominated the news this year, the Wall Street Journal swarmed the story in its typically aggressive fashion, often churning out several articles in a single edition. But when Stewart was convicted on a rainy Friday in March, the world's top business newspaper was mum the next day. That's because the Journal is published only on weekdays, relying solely on its website to stay on top of weekend news until it is back in print on Monday.
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