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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By David Horsey
Octogenarian media mogul Rupert Murdoch began his rise to global power and riches when, at 21, he inherited his father's newspaper business in Australia. Under his tough hide, Murdoch has had a soft spot in his heart for newspapers ever since, which is why he is splitting off the publishing side of his empire from the entertainment side. At Murdoch's urging, News Corp shareholders have approved the division. Remaining under the News Corp umbrella will be 120 newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal, the New York Post, The Times of London and the Australian, plus HarperCollins book publishers.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Jim Puzzanghera
Tribune Co.'s newspaper unit will pay a dividend of up to $275 million to its parent when it is spun off later this year, according to a government filing. The new Tribune Publishing Co. will own the Los Angeles Times and seven other newspapers. Shares of the company will trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol TPUB. Details about the dividend were made public in a lengthy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission submitted late Friday. The dividend has sparked opposition from critics who say it would weigh on the company at a time of diminishing advertising revenue and intensifying digital competition.
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NATIONAL
March 18, 2009 | Associated Press
In an effort to help struggling newspapers stay in business, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is asking the Justice Department to broaden its view of media competition when reviewing merger proposals. Pelosi sent a letter to the Justice Department on Monday saying any antitrust concerns that arise from proposed mergers between newspapers should take into account online news sources and nearby daily and weekly papers "so that the conclusions reached reflect current market realities." The Hearst Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The Fresno Bee is testing a small drone aircraft that could possibly be used for news reporting purposes, the Business Journal reported this week. “This is a new thing and it's way down the pike,” Tom Cullinan, president and publisher of the Fresno Bee, told the Business Journal. “We saw it demonstrated and the cost is reasonable.” The quadcopter would possibly be used for aerial photography of accidents, fires, farmland and waterways, the Journal reported.  Cullinan said the remote-controlled drone would also come in handy in situations where reporters are unable to get to a news scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2009 | By David Ulin
Dave Eggers doesn't look like a newspaper baron. At 39, wearing a baseball cap and hiking boots, the author -- whose most recent project is the screenplay for "Where the Wild Things Are" -- appears more an older brother to the interns who work feverishly in the Mission District offices of McSweeney's, the independent publisher Eggers founded with the proceeds from his bestselling 2000 memoir, "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius." In addition to books and a monthly magazine, McSweeney's publishes a literary journal, McSweeney's Quarterly Concern, the new issue of which is set to appear here today in a form that confounds every trend in publishing: a 300-plus-page Sunday-style broadsheet newspaper called the San Francisco Panorama, with which Eggers and company mean to celebrate the glory of the form.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By Tina Susman
Somebody still enjoys getting the newspaper delivered in Gettysburg, Pa., where the "smack" of the bundle landing on the ground was so loud that it prompted a Gettysburg College student to report gunfire on campus. Before you could say "stop the presses," safety officials had locked down the campus in the city famous for the bloody and pivotal Civil War battle. Thankfully, this time there were no shots fired -- just copies of newspapers landing outside shortly before dawn on Saturday.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Billionaire investor Warren Buffett had opinions to spare Friday, when he dished on JPMorgan's Jamie Dimon, Wells Fargo's home lending prowess, the future of the euro and newspapers, Facebook and more. “I've had enough mistakes of my own that I'm very forgiving when something like that happens,” said the Berkshire Hathaway chairman of JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s huge trading losses. Banks, Buffett said, are by their nature risk-takers - it's how they earn returns for their clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | From a Los Angeles Times staff writer
Newspapers owned by Los Angeles Times Media Group won 15 awards Saturday at the 2010 Better Newspapers Contest, a yearly competition held by the California Newspaper Publishers Assn. The Los Angeles Times, Burbank Leader, Daily Pilot, Huntington Beach Independent and La Cañada Valley Sun were presented with the awards at the organization's annual convention in Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Times placed first in several categories, including investigative or enterprise reporting, writing, breaking news photo and feature photo.
OPINION
July 17, 2011 | By Mike Hoyt
A few years ago my old boss, David Laventhol, had an extended conversation with Rupert Murdoch about newspapers. It was after some sort of big-deal journalism dinner, and they talked long after the tired waiters wished they'd go. David had a storied career in newspapers. He helped invent the Style section of the Washington Post when he was a young editor there. He was editor and publisher of Newsday, publisher of the Los Angeles Times and president of Times Mirror, finishing his career with me at the Columbia Journalism Review.
WORLD
October 29, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian hosts of the Group of 20 summit near St. Petersburg in September sent world leaders home with gifts designed to keep on giving: memory sticks and recharging cables programmed to spy on their communications, two Italian newspapers reported Tuesday. A Kremlin spokesman denied the allegations reported by Il Corriere della Sera and La Stampa, both of which attributed their stories to findings of technical investigations ordered by the president of the European Council and carried out by German intelligence.
WORLD
February 20, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN -- A reformist-oriented daily Iranian newspaper has been shut down and its manager jailed after the publication was accused of insulting Islam, various media accounts reported Thursday. The incident raises questions about pledges to ease press restrictions from President Hassan Rouhani, a moderate who took office in August. The Aseman, or Sky newspaper, which was pro-Rouhani in outlook, was closed for "spreading lies and insulting the holy precepts of Islam,” said the official Islamic Republic News Agency, quoting a source in the public prosecutor's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014
Los Angeles Times photographer Barbara Davidson has been named Newspaper Photographer of the Year in the annual Pictures of the Year International competition. Davidson received first place honors for a portfolio of images from 2013 that depicted trauma surgeons at work, maximum-security inmates at Corcoran State Prison and an Afghan girl treated in the United States for severe burns, among other subjects. The Pictures of the Year announcement praised Davidson's "stunning images" and "strong balance of powerful aesthetic with solid journalistic content.
SPORTS
February 8, 2014 | From staff reports
SOCHI, Russia - U.S. Figure Skating called a report it is involved in collusion to fix the ice dance result in favor of U.S. couple Meryl Davis and Charlie White "categorically false. " The French newspaper L'Equipe, quoting an anonymous Russian coach, said the United States and Russia have struck a deal that would help Davis and White win the ice dance gold and Russia win pairs and the team event. The U.S. dancers have been in close competition with Canadian rivals Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir for five seasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- The San Quentin News, the inmate-run newspaper at one of California's most notorious lockups, is being honored by a journalism association at the same time its operations have been suspended by prison officials. The Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists is recognizing the newspaper, one of the few of its kind in the country, with a freedom of information award for "accomplishing extraordinary journalism under extraordinary circumstances" and lifting "the curtain of secrecy that shrouds those who live behind the walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Above the Fold," the title of former New York Times reporter Bernard Weinraub's stacked new morality play about 21st century journalism now at the Pasadena Playhouse, reveals the author's background as an ink-stained dinosaur. For tablet-reading news junkies under 40, the expression refers to the placement on the front page of a broadsheet newspaper that attracts the most eyeballs and therefore wields the most influence. The very appealing Taraji P. Henson, best known for her role in the CBS crime drama "Person of Interest," stars as Jane, an ambitious reporter at a prestige New York newspaper who's tired of writing lifestyle pieces about trendy Harlem restaurants.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Rep. Henry A. Waxman, after a 30-minute meeting with Tribune Co. Chief Executive Peter Liguori, said he still was concerned about the company's plans to spin off the Los Angeles Times and seven other newspapers into a separate unit. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) had requested the face-to-face discussion after a meeting last month between his staff and Tribune executives failed to ease his worries that the newspapers would be hobbled financially after the spinoff. "I expressed to him my concern that they not leave the L.A. Times and the other newspapers with inadequate funding," Waxman said in an interview Thursday.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2009 | Alana Semuels
Google Inc. said Tuesday that it would shut down an advertising partnership with more than 800 newspapers, a key part of the Internet giant's effort to expand into offline media, because it didn't make enough money. The Print Ads program, which launched with 50 newspapers in November 2006, allowed advertisers to use Google's online services to bid on space in print much as they do for search-engine ads. The service ends Feb. 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Stanley Meisler
WASHINGTON - For a hundred years, artists have been using and abusing newspapers as a vital part of their works. Pungent examples include the Spanish painter Salvador Dali creating an absurd newspaper about himself, the German-born Swiss artist Dieter Roth making a sausage, complete with gelatin and spices, out of copies of the British tabloid Daily Mirror and the American Jim Hodges coating a Jordanian newspaper entirely in 24 karat gold. Little attention has been paid to this phenomenon by the world's museums in the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Joel Rubin and Kate Mather
Eight Los Angeles police officers who opened fire on two women delivering newspapers in a pickup truck during the hunt for Christopher Dorner violated the LAPD's policy on using deadly force, the department's oversight body found Tuesday. In making its ruling, the Police Commission followed the recommendation of LAPD Chief Charlie Beck, who faulted the officers for jumping to the conclusion that Dorner was in the truck. Beck said the officers compounded their mistake by shooting in one another's direction with an unrestrained barrage of gunfire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Tony Perry
Neil Morgan, noted journalist, author and civic force in San Diego for more than six decades, has died. He was 89. Morgan died Saturday at his home in La Jolla after a long illness, including respiratory distress, according to his wife, travel writer Judith Morgan. With his column, first in the San Diego Daily Journal and later the San Diego Evening Tribune, Morgan chronicled the city's coming-of-age beginning after World War II. Among American cities, few were transformed by the war more than San Diego, Morgan often noted.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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