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NEWS
April 24, 1987
President Hosni Mubarak denied that Egypt is warming up to the Soviet Union at the expense of its ties to Washington. "We do not change our colors, and we do not turn our back on a friend that takes our side," Mubarak said in a speech opening a new session of Parliament. His remarks followed suggestions in opposition newspapers that Egypt is displeased with stalled efforts to reschedule its $4.5 billion U.S. military debt.
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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations named six U.S. journalism students on Wednesday to work as interns this year at English-language newspapers in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Deanna L. Hodgin, 28, a graduate student at USC's School of Journalism, was among the six winners. Hodgin completed her undergraduate studies at Mills College in Oakland and also attended Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco. While enrolled at USC, she has worked at the Los Angeles Business Journal, the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, the Santa Monica Outlook and other publications.
OPINION
April 9, 1995 | Charles William Maynes, Charles William Maynes is editor of Foreign Policy
Is America becoming the Rodney Dangerfield of international relations--a country that "gets no respect. Last week, the Russians told Defense Secretary William J. Perry that, notwithstanding U.S. protests, Russia intends to go ahead with its sale of light-water nuclear reactors to Iran. But this is only the latest in a series of rebuffs from foreign governments. Germany and other West Europeans have refused to follow the American lead in trying to end trade with Iran.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The slaying of seven Israeli schoolgirls by a Jordanian soldier this week highlighted what has become a sad truth here--that peace in the Middle East never quite lives up to its name. Or even to expectations. Egypt and Israel made peace nearly 20 years ago, and neither side has much good to say about it still.
NEWS
December 29, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
An Egyptian military court, winding up a monthlong trial that became a cause celebre for anti-government groups opposed to closer relations with Israel, sentenced an Egyptian policeman Saturday to life imprisonment at hard labor for the murder of seven Israeli tourists in the Sinai Peninsula. Sgt. Suleiman Khater, dubbed the "Hero of Sinai" by the newspapers of Egypt's political opposition, was convicted of unpremeditated murder in the Oct.
NEWS
July 18, 1985 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
In its Golden Age, the Middle East was the intellectual center of the world. The great Arab cities--Cairo, Damascus, Baghdad and Cordova, in Spain--nurtured the world's foremost poets, philosophers and scientists. There were no finer libraries and universities anywhere. Baghdad honored its poets with statues.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the riots focused world attention on Los Angeles last spring, one newspaper gave its twist to the news in large red and green letters across the top of its front page. "Divine Justice," the Egyptian weekly Al Nour proclaimed. "Los Angeles Tastes Bitterness of Kuwait and Baghdad." According to this account, the violence wasn't the product of a faulty legal system, or racial discrimination, or even the momentary triumph of the have-nots over the haves. It was the will of God.
OPINION
April 9, 1995 | Robin Wright and Norman Kempster, Robin Wright, who covers global affairs for The Times, is co-author of "Flashpoints: Promise and Peril in a New World" (Knopf). Norman Kempster, a State Department correspondent for The Times, specializes in the Middle East
When Anwar Sadat, a diplomatic icon for his courage and foresight in making peace with Israel, was assassinated in October, 1981, few people in the West were willing to bet on the future of Egypt under his designated successor, then-Vice President Hosni Mubarak. A former Air Force chief of staff who had become vice president in 1975, just two years after the last Middle East war, Mubarak had not established a reputation in the subtler arts of international politics.
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