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February 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
Arsonists on Saturday destroyed the only Salvadoran newspaper that covered the rebel side of the civil war, and the director of the paper blamed the military and the right-wing government. Neighbors said that a government helicopter circled the area before the fire began at the offices of Diario Latino. President Alfredo Cristiani's civilian government issued a statement promising an investigaton and calling the accusations "irresponsible speculation." Military spokesman Col.
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NEWS
April 9, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before dawn on Feb. 9, in the heat of a guerrilla war and an election campaign, arsonists set fire to the offices of El Salvador's only leftist opposition newspaper and crippled its presses. Standing amid the ruins of Diario Latino that day, Editor Francisco Valencia blamed the attack on "the armed forces, the government and their death squads, the same ones who massacre the people and murder priests."
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NEWS
April 9, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before dawn on Feb. 9, in the heat of a guerrilla war and an election campaign, arsonists set fire to the offices of El Salvador's only leftist opposition newspaper and crippled its presses. Standing amid the ruins of Diario Latino that day, Editor Francisco Valencia blamed the attack on "the armed forces, the government and their death squads, the same ones who massacre the people and murder priests."
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
Arsonists on Saturday destroyed the only Salvadoran newspaper that covered the rebel side of the civil war, and the director of the paper blamed the military and the right-wing government. Neighbors said that a government helicopter circled the area before the fire began at the offices of Diario Latino. President Alfredo Cristiani's civilian government issued a statement promising an investigaton and calling the accusations "irresponsible speculation." Military spokesman Col.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes the real world does not wait for the magic of 18 or 21. Sometimes it sneaks in early, taps a kid on the shoulder and starts issuing demands. And then a 15-year-old boy stakes out a spot among grown men and waits on a corner for work. A 12-year-old spends her evenings and weekends selling clothes at a swap meet. These are the youngest members of the American labor force, pushed into the work world by economic necessity.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | JIM NEWTON and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rosa Lopez, the Salvadoran housekeeper whose testimony has occupied the murder trial of O.J. Simpson for nearly a week, admitted under cross-examination Thursday that she has given contradictory statements and that her recollections of some times, dates, conversations and other events are cloudy. Lopez--who mostly remained calm on the stand but who fidgeted at times, twitching one leg and glancing around the courtroom under a persistent cross-examination by Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher A.
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