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NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Reuters
A Philippine court Thursday ordered the arrest of industrialist Eduardo Cojuangco on charges that he acted as a front-man to help the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos take control of the country's largest newspaper. He posted bail of $4,500 pending trial on graft charges. Cojuangco, 55, is widely regarded as the strongest possible opposition candidate for a presidential election due in 1992.
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SPORTS
September 4, 1992 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A joke at the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa., last week was that the best player from the Philippines was a day late showing up because he had been at home with his wife, who was having a baby. Speculation that members of the Philippine Little League championship team were overage was fueled again Thursday when a Filipino newspaper reported that officials in that country had faked documents and lied about birth dates.
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NEWS
January 13, 1987
The Philippine government announced the closure of an opposition newspaper but said it is not reneging on a promise of a free press. Critics said the move constituted censorship. The Presidential Commission on Good Government, citing a drain on the treasury, said that the Daily Express, regarded as a mouthpiece of ousted President Ferdinand E. Marcos during the martial-law years of the 1970s, will be closed Jan. 31.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Reuters
A Philippine court Thursday ordered the arrest of industrialist Eduardo Cojuangco on charges that he acted as a front-man to help the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos take control of the country's largest newspaper. He posted bail of $4,500 pending trial on graft charges. Cojuangco, 55, is widely regarded as the strongest possible opposition candidate for a presidential election due in 1992.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | From Reuters
The Philippine newspaper that accused President Corazon Aquino of hiding under her bed during the latest coup attempt wilted Tuesday under a presidential counterattack. The Philippine Star devoted much of its front page to an apology and ran a cartoon of itself waving an olive branch and declaring, "We're sorry Mrs. President." Writer Luis D. Beltran devoted his entire column to explaining that he had not meant to call Aquino a coward.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This sprawling capital boasts 34 newspapers, and on any given day recently, most have featured Imelda Marcos' remarkable rags-to-stolen-riches trial and tribulation on their front pages. Day after day, too, Manila's columnists and cartoonists have focused on the federal trial in New York City of the former first lady of the Philippines, charged with looting her country of $168 million through racketeering, embezzlement, bribery and extortion.
SPORTS
September 4, 1992 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A joke at the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa., last week was that the best player from the Philippines was a day late showing up because he had been at home with his wife, who was having a baby. Speculation that members of the Philippine Little League championship team were overage was fueled again Thursday when a Filipino newspaper reported that officials in that country had faked documents and lied about birth dates.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This sprawling capital boasts 34 newspapers, and on any given day recently, most have featured Imelda Marcos' remarkable rags-to-stolen-riches trial and tribulation on their front pages. Day after day, too, Manila's columnists and cartoonists have focused on the federal trial in New York City of the former first lady of the Philippines, charged with looting her country of $168 million through racketeering, embezzlement, bribery and extortion.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | From Reuters
The Philippine newspaper that accused President Corazon Aquino of hiding under her bed during the latest coup attempt wilted Tuesday under a presidential counterattack. The Philippine Star devoted much of its front page to an apology and ran a cartoon of itself waving an olive branch and declaring, "We're sorry Mrs. President." Writer Luis D. Beltran devoted his entire column to explaining that he had not meant to call Aquino a coward.
NEWS
January 13, 1987
The Philippine government announced the closure of an opposition newspaper but said it is not reneging on a promise of a free press. Critics said the move constituted censorship. The Presidential Commission on Good Government, citing a drain on the treasury, said that the Daily Express, regarded as a mouthpiece of ousted President Ferdinand E. Marcos during the martial-law years of the 1970s, will be closed Jan. 31.
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