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BUSINESS
April 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A lawsuit settlement between AstraZeneca and India's Ranbaxy Laboratories will ensure that a cheap, copycat version of the best-selling heartburn drug Nexium won't hit the market until 2014. Nexium is the second-biggest prescription medicine globally, with sales of $5.2 billion in 2007. But its future has been under a cloud with the recent expiration of a stay blocking regulatory approval of a generic version. Under the deal, Ranbaxy can start selling a generic version of Nexium in May 2014.
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NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Both laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery and proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium provide long-term control of gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly known as GERD, French researchers reported Tuesday. With either approach, at least 85% of patients achieved long-term relief of symptoms, the team reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. GERD is caused by the reflux or bubbling up of stomach acids into the esophagus, producing intense pain. Inflammation of the esophagus caused by the acid can eventually lead to cancer in some cases.
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NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Both laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery and proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium provide long-term control of gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly known as GERD, French researchers reported Tuesday. With either approach, at least 85% of patients achieved long-term relief of symptoms, the team reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. GERD is caused by the reflux or bubbling up of stomach acids into the esophagus, producing intense pain. Inflammation of the esophagus caused by the acid can eventually lead to cancer in some cases.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Beware the possible downside of those prescription proton pump inhibitors, more commonly known as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, etc., that are often prescribed for gastroesophageal reflux disease or stomach ulcers. They apparently can do a number on your magnesium levels. The Food and Drug Administration warned Wednesday that the drugs can eventually lead to low serum magnesium levels, or hypomagnesemia, when taken for more than a year. Got that? Hypomagnesemia. In other words: Too little magnesium.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Asthma patients using powerful acid-reflux drugs even though they don't have heartburn should stop taking them, lung experts say. The medicine doesn't improve asthma symptoms, as had been thought. A study published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine found that among 412 patients with poorly controlled asthma, the group given the proton pump inhibitor Nexium twice a day for six months fared no better in symptom control than patients getting placebos.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
AstraZeneca won a fight with Walgreen Co., Rite Aid Corp. and three other drug sellers that had accused the pharmaceutical company of breaking the law by how it marketed its blockbuster heartburn medication Nexium. The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia dismissed the complaints and ruled that Walgreen, Rite Aid, Meijer Inc., Louisiana Wholesale Drug and Burlington Drug Co. had failed to show that London-based AstraZeneca violated antitrust law. The drug sellers had accused AstraZeneca of breaking the law by trying to protect its sales by switching its marketing efforts from Prilosec to the more expensive Nexium and an over-the-counter version of Prilosec months before Prilosec's patent expired in 2001.
HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I take zolpidem (Ambien) for insomnia. It helps me fall asleep but not stay asleep, and it gives me a dry mouth. My doctor suggested I try melatonin instead to prolong the time I stay asleep. Does that sound reasonable? The studies on melatonin are mixed. A double-blind French study published this summer in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine found no benefit. It appears to be more useful for jet lag, according to a report in the September issue of Current Treatment Options in Neurology.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Beware the possible downside of those prescription proton pump inhibitors, more commonly known as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, etc., that are often prescribed for gastroesophageal reflux disease or stomach ulcers. They apparently can do a number on your magnesium levels. The Food and Drug Administration warned Wednesday that the drugs can eventually lead to low serum magnesium levels, or hypomagnesemia, when taken for more than a year. Got that? Hypomagnesemia. In other words: Too little magnesium.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2007 | From Reuters
U.S. regulators said Monday that they had cleared AstraZeneca's bestselling heartburn drugs Prilosec and Nexium of links to heart problems, but disclosed a review of a potential risk of hip fractures. The Food and Drug Administration concluded the drugs had no negative effect on the heart, an issue under scrutiny after two small studies suggested a greater risk of heart attacks, heart failure and heart-related sudden death from the drugs than from surgery to remedy severe acid reflux disease.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators said Thursday that they had opened a safety investigation of two popular heartburn drugs -- Nexium, widely marketed as the "purple pill," and Prilosec, its older chemical cousin -- after receiving clinical data that appeared to link them to serious heart problems. But the Food and Drug Administration emphasized that it had found no firm evidence of such a connection, and advised doctors and patients not to change medication practices.
HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I take zolpidem (Ambien) for insomnia. It helps me fall asleep but not stay asleep, and it gives me a dry mouth. My doctor suggested I try melatonin instead to prolong the time I stay asleep. Does that sound reasonable? The studies on melatonin are mixed. A double-blind French study published this summer in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine found no benefit. It appears to be more useful for jet lag, according to a report in the September issue of Current Treatment Options in Neurology.
SCIENCE
May 11, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The widely used family of acid-reducing drugs that includes Prilosec, Nexium and Protonix increases the risk of bone fractures by about 25% and can more than double the risk of contracting the troublesome bacterium Clostridium difficile , new studies released Monday confirm. The increased risk is not thought to be caused by the drugs themselves, but by the sharply reduced levels of acid in the stomach and intestinal tract, which make the organs a more hospitable environment for infectious agents like C. difficile and which can impair the uptake of the calcium required for strong bones.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2009 | Andrew Zajac
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday warned consumers not to take popular heartburn medications Nexium or Prilosec if they use Plavix, a widely prescribed blood thinner that guards against heart attack and stroke. The two heartburn formulations can reduce the protective blood-thinning effect of Plavix by nearly half, according to a study undertaken at the request of the FDA by the blood thinner's marketers, Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol-Myers Squibb. Nexium and Prilosec inhibit a liver enzyme that is involved in converting Plavix into active form.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Asthma patients using powerful acid-reflux drugs even though they don't have heartburn should stop taking them, lung experts say. The medicine doesn't improve asthma symptoms, as had been thought. A study published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine found that among 412 patients with poorly controlled asthma, the group given the proton pump inhibitor Nexium twice a day for six months fared no better in symptom control than patients getting placebos.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A lawsuit settlement between AstraZeneca and India's Ranbaxy Laboratories will ensure that a cheap, copycat version of the best-selling heartburn drug Nexium won't hit the market until 2014. Nexium is the second-biggest prescription medicine globally, with sales of $5.2 billion in 2007. But its future has been under a cloud with the recent expiration of a stay blocking regulatory approval of a generic version. Under the deal, Ranbaxy can start selling a generic version of Nexium in May 2014.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
AstraZeneca won a fight with Walgreen Co., Rite Aid Corp. and three other drug sellers that had accused the pharmaceutical company of breaking the law by how it marketed its blockbuster heartburn medication Nexium. The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia dismissed the complaints and ruled that Walgreen, Rite Aid, Meijer Inc., Louisiana Wholesale Drug and Burlington Drug Co. had failed to show that London-based AstraZeneca violated antitrust law. The drug sellers had accused AstraZeneca of breaking the law by trying to protect its sales by switching its marketing efforts from Prilosec to the more expensive Nexium and an over-the-counter version of Prilosec months before Prilosec's patent expired in 2001.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2009 | Andrew Zajac
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday warned consumers not to take popular heartburn medications Nexium or Prilosec if they use Plavix, a widely prescribed blood thinner that guards against heart attack and stroke. The two heartburn formulations can reduce the protective blood-thinning effect of Plavix by nearly half, according to a study undertaken at the request of the FDA by the blood thinner's marketers, Sanofi-Aventis and Bristol-Myers Squibb. Nexium and Prilosec inhibit a liver enzyme that is involved in converting Plavix into active form.
SCIENCE
May 11, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The widely used family of acid-reducing drugs that includes Prilosec, Nexium and Protonix increases the risk of bone fractures by about 25% and can more than double the risk of contracting the troublesome bacterium Clostridium difficile , new studies released Monday confirm. The increased risk is not thought to be caused by the drugs themselves, but by the sharply reduced levels of acid in the stomach and intestinal tract, which make the organs a more hospitable environment for infectious agents like C. difficile and which can impair the uptake of the calcium required for strong bones.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2007 | From Reuters
U.S. regulators said Monday that they had cleared AstraZeneca's bestselling heartburn drugs Prilosec and Nexium of links to heart problems, but disclosed a review of a potential risk of hip fractures. The Food and Drug Administration concluded the drugs had no negative effect on the heart, an issue under scrutiny after two small studies suggested a greater risk of heart attacks, heart failure and heart-related sudden death from the drugs than from surgery to remedy severe acid reflux disease.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators said Thursday that they had opened a safety investigation of two popular heartburn drugs -- Nexium, widely marketed as the "purple pill," and Prilosec, its older chemical cousin -- after receiving clinical data that appeared to link them to serious heart problems. But the Food and Drug Administration emphasized that it had found no firm evidence of such a connection, and advised doctors and patients not to change medication practices.
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