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Nez Perce Indians

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NEWS
February 24, 1991
Once again, a television network (ABC) has seen fit to rehash the story of Gen. (George A.) Custer ("The Son of the Morning Star," Feb. 3-4). I have one question . . . why? Why not a story about Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce Indians, who bred the Appaloosa horse? Is it possible that the Indian Wars are not over? Carol A. Boardman, Tehachapi
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NEWS
February 15, 2004 | Andrew Kramer, Associated Press Writer
Commissioners in northeastern Oregon's Wallowa County have approved plans for an upscale subdivision near the grave of Old Chief Joseph, land considered culturally significant to the Nez Perce Indians. The Nez Perce and two other Northwest tribes had challenged plans for 11 homes on 62 acres near the grave on a site that is also a trailhead of the Nez Perce National Historic Trail. Chief Joseph, son of Old Chief Joseph, followed the trail in 1877 in a 1,500-mile fighting retreat from the U.S.
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NEWS
February 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Wallowa County Board of Commissioners will wait another week before deciding whether to approve the construction of 11 upscale homes on land considered culturally significant to the Nez Perce Indians. The county commissioners deliberated for two hours Monday before deciding to continue the hearing a week. The proposed subdivision is near a Nez Perce cemetery that includes the grave of Old Chief Joseph.
NEWS
February 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Wallowa County Board of Commissioners will wait another week before deciding whether to approve the construction of 11 upscale homes on land considered culturally significant to the Nez Perce Indians. The county commissioners deliberated for two hours Monday before deciding to continue the hearing a week. The proposed subdivision is near a Nez Perce cemetery that includes the grave of Old Chief Joseph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1986
As an expatriate Montanan, I appreciated your story on Montana and the Montana outlook. It's a great and beautiful state, but is quite limited in opportunities to make a living. Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians were not massacred at the Big Hole. Joseph was trying to lead his band in an escape from the whites with the idea of living in Canada. Colonel Gibbons forced a battle at the Big Hole but it was not really a victory for either side. In fact, Joseph captured some of the Army's guns.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | Andrew Kramer, Associated Press Writer
In 1877, Chief Joseph and his band of Nez Perce Indians were forced to abandon their beloved Wallowa Valley in a trek that turned into a war with the U.S. Cavalry and ended with their surrender 1,500 miles away, near the Canadian border. Delivering one of the most heartbreaking surrender speeches in history, Chief Joseph said: "I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever."
NEWS
February 15, 2004 | Andrew Kramer, Associated Press Writer
Commissioners in northeastern Oregon's Wallowa County have approved plans for an upscale subdivision near the grave of Old Chief Joseph, land considered culturally significant to the Nez Perce Indians. The Nez Perce and two other Northwest tribes had challenged plans for 11 homes on 62 acres near the grave on a site that is also a trailhead of the Nez Perce National Historic Trail. Chief Joseph, son of Old Chief Joseph, followed the trail in 1877 in a 1,500-mile fighting retreat from the U.S.
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
The knife is roughly hewn, bold dents and worn metal revealing old age and use. The handle is cracked and dark with time, the blade dull. But the appearance of this 200-year-old weapon belies its importance. Hidden for years in the tiny archive room at Fort Clatsop National Memorial, the knife--a replica of which was recently on display--may have been forged by members of Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery as a peace offering to Nez Perce tribes who helped save the explorers' lives.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along the North Fork of the Big Hole River, Wilford Halfmoon stopped to listen. And there it was again, just beyond the wind--the sound of battle, a faint rumbling that came up from the pines and, growing louder, dizzied his head with whirling visions.
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horace Axtell always cries when the spring rain clouds stack up on the ridges and thunder rumbles down the Wallowa Valley. He figures it is a genetic weeping. His grandmother, who fled the valley with Chief Joseph and his band 120 years ago, always cried with the thunder. She said she was lonesome for the land. But Axtell thinks maybe she was remembering Joseph, the man they called Thunder Rolling From the Mountains.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | Andrew Kramer, Associated Press Writer
In 1877, Chief Joseph and his band of Nez Perce Indians were forced to abandon their beloved Wallowa Valley in a trek that turned into a war with the U.S. Cavalry and ended with their surrender 1,500 miles away, near the Canadian border. Delivering one of the most heartbreaking surrender speeches in history, Chief Joseph said: "I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever."
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
The knife is roughly hewn, bold dents and worn metal revealing old age and use. The handle is cracked and dark with time, the blade dull. But the appearance of this 200-year-old weapon belies its importance. Hidden for years in the tiny archive room at Fort Clatsop National Memorial, the knife--a replica of which was recently on display--may have been forged by members of Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery as a peace offering to Nez Perce tribes who helped save the explorers' lives.
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horace Axtell always cries when the spring rain clouds stack up on the ridges and thunder rumbles down the Wallowa Valley. He figures it is a genetic weeping. His grandmother, who fled the valley with Chief Joseph and his band 120 years ago, always cried with the thunder. She said she was lonesome for the land. But Axtell thinks maybe she was remembering Joseph, the man they called Thunder Rolling From the Mountains.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along the North Fork of the Big Hole River, Wilford Halfmoon stopped to listen. And there it was again, just beyond the wind--the sound of battle, a faint rumbling that came up from the pines and, growing louder, dizzied his head with whirling visions.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Once again, a television network (ABC) has seen fit to rehash the story of Gen. (George A.) Custer ("The Son of the Morning Star," Feb. 3-4). I have one question . . . why? Why not a story about Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce Indians, who bred the Appaloosa horse? Is it possible that the Indian Wars are not over? Carol A. Boardman, Tehachapi
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1986
As an expatriate Montanan, I appreciated your story on Montana and the Montana outlook. It's a great and beautiful state, but is quite limited in opportunities to make a living. Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians were not massacred at the Big Hole. Joseph was trying to lead his band in an escape from the whites with the idea of living in Canada. Colonel Gibbons forced a battle at the Big Hole but it was not really a victory for either side. In fact, Joseph captured some of the Army's guns.
TRAVEL
October 17, 2010
Northwestern U.S. and Canada The Northwestern U.S. and Canada are veined with 10 unique roadways and four connecting trails along what has become known as the Top 10 Scenic Drives in the Northern Rockies. If you're intent on doing one of these drives, you can start at such gateway cities as Spokane, Wash., Salt Lake City; Boise, Idaho; Billings, Mont; Denver; or Calgary, Canada; and rent a car, SUV, RV or motorcycle to explore the nearest drive. Among them: The 400-mile Montana Scenic Loop reveals the majesty of Glacier National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1995 | DAN GALLAGHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It didn't start well. On Jan. 29, shortly after 15 Canadian wolves were released along the frozen banks of the Salmon River, a female wolf was shot to death at Gene Hussey's Lemhi County ranch. It appeared that she was killed as she ate a newborn calf--a nightmare come to life for ranchers who had opposed the wolves from the beginning. But U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials later determined the calf was dead before the wolf reached it, and tensions eased.
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