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August 29, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
Reaction to the proposed $765-million settlement between the NFL and more than 4,500 retired players regarding concussion-related lawsuits was swift on social media and old-school media. It came from legal, medical, financial experts and former players. Multiple media outlets reported that the NFL has 20 years to pay out the settlement. Half is to be paid out in the first three years and the remainder the following 17 years, according to ESPN's Darren Rovell. “I like the sound of it. As a former player, I've been aware of the discussion back and forth,” said retired NFL great Barry Sanders on ESPN News on Thursday morning.
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April 16, 2014 | By Sam Farmer, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
A federal judge in Philadelphia declined Wednesday to approve a proposed $765-million concussion settlement between the NFL and a group of retired players. [UPDATED, 4:30 p.m. PDT, April 16:  Although this was originally characterized as a setback for those pushing for a concussion settlement, attorneys for the plaintiffs clarified Wednesday afternoon that U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody's ruling was more of a procedural housekeeping item. The ruling was submitted electronically late Tuesday and was announced Wednesday.
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SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
So, what happens with the $765-million concussion settlement, now that the NFL and more than 4,500 retired players have reached an accord? Once the final documentation is complete, the settlement will be filed with Judge Anita B. Brody, who is presiding over these cases in federal court in Philadelphia. She will then schedule a hearing to consider whether to grant preliminary approval. If the settlement receives that approval, the retired players will receive official notification and have an opportunity to file objections to the settlement.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The estate of Pro Football Hall of Famer Mike Webster has sued the NFL over concussions the Pittsburgh Steelers center sustained during his career. Webster's is one of six estates of deceased former players among the 66 plaintiffs in the lawsuit that was  filed in L.A. Superior Court last month and moved to U.S. District Court for the Central District of California this week. The plaintiffs include the estates of former Steelers offensive linemen Terry Long and Justin Strzelczyk.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Sam Farmer, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
A federal judge in Philadelphia declined Wednesday to approve a proposed $765-million concussion settlement between the NFL and a group of retired players. [UPDATED, 4:30 p.m. PDT, April 16:  Although this was originally characterized as a setback for those pushing for a concussion settlement, attorneys for the plaintiffs clarified Wednesday afternoon that U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody's ruling was more of a procedural housekeeping item. The ruling was submitted electronically late Tuesday and was announced Wednesday.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
The late Junior Seau was not far from the thoughts of friends and associates in the immediate aftermath of news of a proposed settlement of concussion-related lawsuits between the NFL and more than 4,500 ex-players. Seau,  the former San Diego Chargers linebacker and USC star, committed suicide in 2012. He was 43. Tight end Alex Holmes also played for USC -- long after Seau's era -- and played eight games in the NFL with Miami in 2005. He tweeted about the proposed settlement on Thursday morning.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Sam Farmer and Melissa Healy
In an unexpected acknowledgment of the medical damage sustained by professional football players, the National Football League on Thursday reached a tentative settlement to provide $765 million in medical and other benefits to former players suffering from concussion-related brain injuries. The settlement of a lawsuit brought by 4,500 former players allows the league to avoid years of litigation and the potential for billions of dollars in damages. Current players are not covered by the agreement, which awaits approval by a federal judge.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Here's one solution to the National Football League's concussion problem: Stop playing at sea level. Researchers have found that concussion rates are about 30% lower in games played at higher altitudes. The finding was based on an analysis of all 300 concussions reported during the first 16 weeks of regular-season NFL games in 2012 and 2013. (Week 17 data were not available, since only playoff-bound teams release them.) For every 10,000 times a player suited up, there were 64.3 concussions.
SPORTS
January 14, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
Lawyers who have proposed a $765-million settlement with the NFL on behalf of roughly 20,000 retired players say they are confident the deal will be approved in court, even though a federal judge on Tuesday rejected the agreement as insufficient. “We are confident that the settlement will be approved after the Court conducts its due diligence on the fairness and adequacy of the proposed agreement,” Christopher Seeger of Seeger Weiss LLP and Sol Weiss of Anapol Schwartz, co-lead counsels for the retired NFL player plaintiffs, said in a written statement.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
During the pregame show before February's Super Bowl in New Orleans, Deion Sanders shared his thoughts about the thousands of former football players filing concussion lawsuits against the National Football League. "The game is a safe game," the television analyst and Hall of Fame cornerback said. "I don't buy all these guys coming back with these concussions. I'm not buying all that. Half these guys are trying to make money off the deal. " What Sanders didn't say was that more than two years earlier he had filed a workers' compensation claim in California, alleging head trauma and other injuries incurred while playing for the Dallas Cowboys.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Here's one solution to the National Football League's concussion problem: Stop playing at sea level. Researchers have found that concussion rates are about 30% lower in games played at higher altitudes. The finding was based on an analysis of all 300 concussions reported during the first 16 weeks of regular-season NFL games in 2012 and 2013. (Week 17 data were not available, since only playoff-bound teams release them.) For every 10,000 times a player suited up, there were 64.3 concussions.
SPORTS
January 14, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
Lawyers who have proposed a $765-million settlement with the NFL on behalf of roughly 20,000 retired players say they are confident the deal will be approved in court, even though a federal judge on Tuesday rejected the agreement as insufficient. “We are confident that the settlement will be approved after the Court conducts its due diligence on the fairness and adequacy of the proposed agreement,” Christopher Seeger of Seeger Weiss LLP and Sol Weiss of Anapol Schwartz, co-lead counsels for the retired NFL player plaintiffs, said in a written statement.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
During the pregame show before February's Super Bowl in New Orleans, Deion Sanders shared his thoughts about the thousands of former football players filing concussion lawsuits against the National Football League. "The game is a safe game," the television analyst and Hall of Fame cornerback said. "I don't buy all these guys coming back with these concussions. I'm not buying all that. Half these guys are trying to make money off the deal. " What Sanders didn't say was that more than two years earlier he had filed a workers' compensation claim in California, alleging head trauma and other injuries incurred while playing for the Dallas Cowboys.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
The late Junior Seau was not far from the thoughts of friends and associates in the immediate aftermath of news of a proposed settlement of concussion-related lawsuits between the NFL and more than 4,500 ex-players. Seau,  the former San Diego Chargers linebacker and USC star, committed suicide in 2012. He was 43. Tight end Alex Holmes also played for USC -- long after Seau's era -- and played eight games in the NFL with Miami in 2005. He tweeted about the proposed settlement on Thursday morning.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
Reaction to the proposed $765-million settlement between the NFL and more than 4,500 retired players regarding concussion-related lawsuits was swift on social media and old-school media. It came from legal, medical, financial experts and former players. Multiple media outlets reported that the NFL has 20 years to pay out the settlement. Half is to be paid out in the first three years and the remainder the following 17 years, according to ESPN's Darren Rovell. “I like the sound of it. As a former player, I've been aware of the discussion back and forth,” said retired NFL great Barry Sanders on ESPN News on Thursday morning.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
So, what happens with the $765-million concussion settlement, now that the NFL and more than 4,500 retired players have reached an accord? Once the final documentation is complete, the settlement will be filed with Judge Anita B. Brody, who is presiding over these cases in federal court in Philadelphia. She will then schedule a hearing to consider whether to grant preliminary approval. If the settlement receives that approval, the retired players will receive official notification and have an opportunity to file objections to the settlement.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The estate of Pro Football Hall of Famer Mike Webster has sued the NFL over concussions the Pittsburgh Steelers center sustained during his career. Webster's is one of six estates of deceased former players among the 66 plaintiffs in the lawsuit that was  filed in L.A. Superior Court last month and moved to U.S. District Court for the Central District of California this week. The plaintiffs include the estates of former Steelers offensive linemen Terry Long and Justin Strzelczyk.
SPORTS
November 28, 1992 | Associated Press
In the midst of a slow recovery from his ninth concussion, Al Toon retired from the New York Jets Friday. The three-time Pro Bowl receiver is only 29. Although the Jets say Toon has sustained five concussions in his eight-year career, Toon claims the number is nine. The latest came against Denver Nov. 8 when he was hit by linebacker Michael Brooks and his head hit the turf; Toon also had gotten a knee to the head a few plays earlier.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Sam Farmer and Melissa Healy
In an unexpected acknowledgment of the medical damage sustained by professional football players, the National Football League on Thursday reached a tentative settlement to provide $765 million in medical and other benefits to former players suffering from concussion-related brain injuries. The settlement of a lawsuit brought by 4,500 former players allows the league to avoid years of litigation and the potential for billions of dollars in damages. Current players are not covered by the agreement, which awaits approval by a federal judge.
SPORTS
November 28, 1992 | Associated Press
In the midst of a slow recovery from his ninth concussion, Al Toon retired from the New York Jets Friday. The three-time Pro Bowl receiver is only 29. Although the Jets say Toon has sustained five concussions in his eight-year career, Toon claims the number is nine. The latest came against Denver Nov. 8 when he was hit by linebacker Michael Brooks and his head hit the turf; Toon also had gotten a knee to the head a few plays earlier.
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