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Ngugi Wa Thiongo

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
Two local authors examine how writers take on the challenges posed by political and cultural conflict in today's world . Laila Lalami , originally from Morocco, will discuss her latest novel, "Secret Son," which traces one boy's turn to radical Islam. Kenyan novelist, essayist, journalist, editor and all-around intellectual Ngugi wa Thiong'o will talk about "Dreams in a Time of War: A Childhood Memoir." ALOUD at Central Library, 630 W. 5th St. 7 p.m. Thu. www.lfla.org.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
In the House of the Interpreter A Memoir Ngugi wa Thiong'o Pantheon: 256 pp., $25.95 "In the House of the Interpreter," the new memoir by the celebrated African writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o, takes us to the hopeful and turbulent world of 1950s Kenya. And it begins with a startling image. Ngugi is a teenager, returning home from his prestigious boarding school. He's finished his first term at the top of his class and is still wearing his khaki school uniform and blue tie. Carrying his belongings in a wooden box, he reaches the ridge where his village should come into view.
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WORLD
August 20, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
When one of the giants of African literature, Ngugi wa Thiongo, returned here to his homeland after 20 years in exile, he kissed the soil, breathed deep the air, listened to the sounds he had missed so dearly. But the theme of his lecture tour, "Reviving the Spirit," was savagely destroyed when thugs armed with guns and a machete burst into the Nairobi apartment where he and his wife, Mary Njeri, were staying, robbed, beat and tortured him and raped her.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010
Two local authors examine how writers take on the challenges posed by political and cultural conflict in today's world . Laila Lalami , originally from Morocco, will discuss her latest novel, "Secret Son," which traces one boy's turn to radical Islam. Kenyan novelist, essayist, journalist, editor and all-around intellectual Ngugi wa Thiong'o will talk about "Dreams in a Time of War: A Childhood Memoir." ALOUD at Central Library, 630 W. 5th St. 7 p.m. Thu. www.lfla.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
In the House of the Interpreter A Memoir Ngugi wa Thiong'o Pantheon: 256 pp., $25.95 "In the House of the Interpreter," the new memoir by the celebrated African writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o, takes us to the hopeful and turbulent world of 1950s Kenya. And it begins with a startling image. Ngugi is a teenager, returning home from his prestigious boarding school. He's finished his first term at the top of his class and is still wearing his khaki school uniform and blue tie. Carrying his belongings in a wooden box, he reaches the ridge where his village should come into view.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2006 | Matthew DeBord, Special to The Times
NGUGI wa Thiong'o inhabits a world of subtle yet ever-present incongruity. In the mellow light of an early September afternoon, seated in the comfortable living room of his house on the campus of the University of California, Irvine, Kenya's most widely lauded writer and his wife, Njeeri wa Ngugi, calmly discussed what it was like to be held at gunpoint by thugs, awaiting death. "We narrowly escaped," Njeeri said. Outside in the driveway, there was a pile of bikes belonging to their kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Kokoro Natsume Soseki, translated from the Japanese by Meredith McKinney Penguin Classics: 238 pp., $15 paper This elegant novel of the Meiji period captures the opening in Japanese Confucian culture and the 250-year-old Tokugawa shogunate to the West and Western culture. It was published in 1914, two years before Natsume Soseki's death. "Kokoro," which means "heart," is the story of a friendship between the young narrator and a wise elder -- "sensei" -- who is like a "great gingko tree," a man full of beauty, love and haunting memories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHNANNESBURG, South Africa - When Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe was in college, a European professor assigned "Mister Johnson," which portrayed Africa as a land of grinning, shrieking savages. Time magazine called it "the best novel ever written about Africa. " Achebe was outraged. He vowed that if someone as ignorant as Joyce Cary, the novel's Anglo-Irish author, could write such a book, "perhaps I ought to try my hand at it. " FOR THE RECORD: Chinua Achebe obituary: In the March 22 Section A, the obituary of Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe referred to writer Ngugi wa Thiongo as a fellow Nigerian.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
You're a writer of a certain age. Perhaps you started a family when you were younger, and now your progeny are old enough that you have time to immerse yourself in that novel or short story you always wanted to write. Or perhaps the muse only came to you at the same time those first few gray hairs popped up on your head. But when you pick up the odd book review or magazine, you are disturbed by the cult of youth that seems to have infected American letters: case in point, the New Yorker's “20 under 40” fiction issue.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been updated. Please see the note below for details.
San Francisco's Litquake announced the schedule for its eight-day literary festival, which takes place in several venues during October, on Tuesday. Eight-hundred and forty local and international authors will be reading and talking about books. Some of the notable authors scheduled to appear are former U.S. poet laureate Robert Hass, humorist Merrill Markoe, Kenyan exile Ngugi wa Thiong'o, mystery writer Zoe Ferraris, satirist Will Self, California poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, writer Michelle Tea, Zyzzyva editor Oscar Villalon, poet Matthew Zapruder, fantasist Karen Joy Fowler, comedian Michael Ian Black, essayist Rebecca Solnit, underground publisher Adam Parfrey, novelist Andrew Sean Greer, poet D.A. Powell, thriller writer David Corbett, actor Chris Elliott, novelist Joshua Mohr and Salon.com founder David Talbot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Kokoro Natsume Soseki, translated from the Japanese by Meredith McKinney Penguin Classics: 238 pp., $15 paper This elegant novel of the Meiji period captures the opening in Japanese Confucian culture and the 250-year-old Tokugawa shogunate to the West and Western culture. It was published in 1914, two years before Natsume Soseki's death. "Kokoro," which means "heart," is the story of a friendship between the young narrator and a wise elder -- "sensei" -- who is like a "great gingko tree," a man full of beauty, love and haunting memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2006 | Matthew DeBord, Special to The Times
NGUGI wa Thiong'o inhabits a world of subtle yet ever-present incongruity. In the mellow light of an early September afternoon, seated in the comfortable living room of his house on the campus of the University of California, Irvine, Kenya's most widely lauded writer and his wife, Njeeri wa Ngugi, calmly discussed what it was like to be held at gunpoint by thugs, awaiting death. "We narrowly escaped," Njeeri said. Outside in the driveway, there was a pile of bikes belonging to their kids.
WORLD
August 20, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
When one of the giants of African literature, Ngugi wa Thiongo, returned here to his homeland after 20 years in exile, he kissed the soil, breathed deep the air, listened to the sounds he had missed so dearly. But the theme of his lecture tour, "Reviving the Spirit," was savagely destroyed when thugs armed with guns and a machete burst into the Nairobi apartment where he and his wife, Mary Njeri, were staying, robbed, beat and tortured him and raped her.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Penguin will expand its small library e-book lending program to two major regions, Cleveland and Los Angeles County. About a year ago, Penguin pulled its e-books from libraries. The change is about back-end distribution systems: Instead of using the market-dominant OverDrive, Penguin is expanding a pilot program with 3M using distributor Baker & Taylor. This is super-interesting to people who know a lot about libraries and e-books, less so to end users. The upshot: Los Angeles County library readers should be able to borrow the e-book of Junot Diaz's "This Is How You Lose Her" before the end of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Karl Rove: Fox News commentator, conservative who caused consternation on election night , major Republican strategist. And fan of metafictional writer Jorge Luis Borges. Yes, really. The news comes from Rove's own website ( via Twitter ). Since 2010, Rove has been posting his recently read books on his website, Rove.com ; Borges' "Everything and Nothing," published by New Directions, is No. 65, read by Rove this year. He writes, "I don't read much fiction but the stories, tales and essays of the Argentinan fabulist, Jorge Luis Borges, are worth reading and re-reading, as I did when I picked up a new collection of his work EVERYTHING AND NOTHING (NEW DIRECTIONS PEARLS)
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