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Nicaragua Elections

OPINION
November 12, 1989 | Art Seidenbaum, Art Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor
The big question--whether elections will proceed, can proceed, in the midst of civil war--may be the easiest one to answer in this nation of economic chaos and political contradictions. Everybody seems to expect that the voting for president, Assembly and municipal offices will occur on schedule, Feb. 25, 1990. Whether those elections will be free and fair is a tougher question. Even now, with a U.N.
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NEWS
October 28, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A hemispheric summit meeting that Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez had billed as a celebration of democracy convened here Friday but was quickly overshadowed by the likelihood of renewed warfare in neighboring Nicaragua. President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua announced after the session had ended that his government will resume offensive actions against the U.S.-backed Contras next week because the rebels have ignored a 19-month cease-fire and are stepping up attacks.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arnoldo Aleman got into politics to defeat the Marxists who confiscated his coffee fields while his wife had terminal cancer and who held him in jail when his father died. He succeeded Monday. With votes still coming in from outlying precincts, he took a lead that virtually assured him victory in this nation's presidential election.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
A 20-member congressional group named by President Bush to observe this month's elections in Nicaragua has been disbanded after members were denied visas by the leftist Managua government, Sen. Richard G. Lugar said Wednesday. Lugar, an Indiana Republican, said President Bush concurs that there is no chance for the group to serve its intended function of determining whether the Feb. 25 balloting is free and fair.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | Reuters
Problems with Nicaragua's election campaign have been addressed well enough for people to have a free choice when they vote Sunday, United Nations envoy Elliot Richardson said Tuesday. Richardson, a former U.S. attorney general charged by U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar with observing the elections, arrived in Nicaragua on Tuesday and will stay until after the elections.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years had passed since Cesar Antonio Chavarria left his farm to join a band of peasants fighting with pistols and shotguns to oust the Sandinista revolutionary government. Chavarria had become rebel Comandante Dumas, a leader in the Contra army that surpassed 12,000 fighters under the tutelage of the United States. His sisters, meanwhile, farmed land given them by the government and sent sons into the ballooning ranks of the Sandinista Popular Army.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Humberto Jiron is, by his own account, an undecided voter, an independent farmer without a party. He reads three newspapers a day trying to make up his mind. He is also a community service organizer and president of his polling precinct for Nicaragua's Feb. 25 election. He is the kind of citizen, it seems, whose vote would be courted with care by the Sandinista government and its opponents.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Latin American democracies Monday embraced Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's stunning upset victory in Nicaragua as proof of an anti-totalitarian groundswell in the region. Chamorro's victory "enormously fortified democracy in the region, and we can foresee a promising future for her country and for definitive peace," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said in a statement in Buenos Aires. El Salvador, a close U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In conceding defeat early Monday, President Daniel Ortega became the first Nicaraguan president to abide by a freely held election. The revolutionary leader made history when he thanked "brothers, militants of the Sandinista National Liberation Front and combatants of the Sandinista Popular Army" for their role in guaranteeing the freedom of the vote. But while Ortega solemnly vowed to turn over the government to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and her U.S.
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