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Nicaragua Elections

NEWS
March 1, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush telephoned Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday to urge him to help bring about a peaceful transition of power from Nicaragua's Sandinistas to the newly elected opposition government, officials said. The unusual summit-level telephone diplomacy was part of a major effort by U.S. officials to persuade all factions in Nicaragua, from the leftist Sandinistas to the U.S.
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NEWS
March 1, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move that could finally end the war with the Contras, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega decreed an immediate halt to offensive operations by the Sandinista army Wednesday, two months before he is to leave office. The cease-fire came hours after Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, who upset Ortega in Sunday's presidential election, joined the Sandinista government in urging the U.S.-backed guerrillas to disarm at once and return to civilian life.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro joined the defeated Sandinista government Tuesday night in urging the U.S.-backed Contras to disarm immediately and end their eight-year-old rebellion. "The causes of this civil war have disappeared," Chamorro said in her first substantive message since her stunning electoral upset of President Daniel Ortega on Sunday. "There is no reason for more war.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Nicaragua can hold a free election and cope with the results, Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez said last weekend, "Central America will be a very different place." Arias, the architect of the peace talks that led to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's surprise election Sunday as president of Nicaragua, already has seen his prediction come true.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shocked, angered and pained by their electoral defeat, thousands of Sandinista militants surrounded a closed-door meeting of their party leadership Tuesday shouting, "We are the army!" and "We've got the guns!" Demonstrators from organizations such as the Sandinista Youth and Mothers of Heroes and Martyrs joined soldiers and officers of the Sandinista Popular Army, raising their fists overhead in a show of support for President Daniel Ortega.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Reuters
Cuba's Communist Party newspaper Granma said Tuesday that Nicaragua's Sandinista revolution is entering "a new stage of struggle" after the defeat of the leftist government in elections Sunday. "There is no doubt that it is a great setback, but it doesn't mean political bankruptcy (for the Sandinistas)," Granma said in an editorial. "The Nicaraguan revolution has passed through a tough test and is entering a new stage of struggle," it added.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first concrete payoff in Latin America from warming U.S.-Soviet relations, Moscow played a key role in persuading Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega to hold the election that swept him from office, a senior State Department official said Tuesday. The official, who briefed reporters on the understanding he would not be identified, said the Soviet Union pressed Ortega's government to abide by last year's Central American peace accords, which called for contested elections.
NEWS
February 28, 1990
The National Opposition Union (UNO), winner of Nicaragua's election, has been the main opponent of the leftist Sandinista regime. Formerly called the Group of 14, it consists of 14 parties gathered under five labels: Social Christians Christian Democratic Party. Center-right, led by Augustin Jarquin; split from Social Christian Party in 1987 over leadership dispute. (a) National Action Party.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Latin American democracies Monday embraced Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's stunning upset victory in Nicaragua as proof of an anti-totalitarian groundswell in the region. Chamorro's victory "enormously fortified democracy in the region, and we can foresee a promising future for her country and for definitive peace," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said in a statement in Buenos Aires. El Salvador, a close U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In conceding defeat early Monday, President Daniel Ortega became the first Nicaraguan president to abide by a freely held election. The revolutionary leader made history when he thanked "brothers, militants of the Sandinista National Liberation Front and combatants of the Sandinista Popular Army" for their role in guaranteeing the freedom of the vote. But while Ortega solemnly vowed to turn over the government to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and her U.S.
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