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NEWS
March 27, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
The Sandinista-dominated National Assembly passed a law Saturday enabling the government to eventually free more than 3,000 political prisoners under the truce agreement signed by the government last week with leaders of the U.S.-backed Contras. Those to be released include 1,837 members of the old Nicaraguan National Guard, which the Sandinistas fought in a bitter guerrilla war that finally brought them to power in 1979.
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NEWS
June 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Militants seized control of a radio station and City Hall on Tuesday to protest a move to revoke laws that gave thousands of Sandinistas free property in the final months of their decade of rule. No one was seriously hurt in the takeovers at Radio Corporacion, a rightist station, and at City Hall. In both cases, masked men identifying themselves as Sandinistas forced their way into the buildings and vowed to remain inside.
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NEWS
March 29, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after being voted out of office, the Sandinistas voted themselves into the former homes of their political enemies Wednesday, legalizing the occupation of about 10,000 residences seized during a decade of revolution. By a vote of 67 to 2, the Sandinista-dominated National Assembly awarded property titles to anyone who was living in a state-owned house before the Feb. 25 election and had signed a public registry.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after being voted out of office, the Sandinistas voted themselves into the former homes of their political enemies Wednesday, legalizing the occupation of about 10,000 residences seized during a decade of revolution. By a vote of 67 to 2, the Sandinista-dominated National Assembly awarded property titles to anyone who was living in a state-owned house before the Feb. 25 election and had signed a public registry.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Tuesday approved $9 million to help the Nicaraguan opposition in that country's elections, but only after President Bush persuaded conservative senators to put aside fears that the vote could be used against them in negative campaign commercials. The senators' anxiety was laced with irony: several of them, including North Carolina Republican Jesse Helms, were among the earliest and most unrestrained users of the 30-second political rabbit punches they now fear.
NEWS
September 4, 1987
Nicaragua's National Assembly passed a law granting limited political and economic autonomy to the ethnic minorities that make up most of the citizens of its Atlantic Coast, the official newspaper Barricada reported.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
A law governing future Nicaraguan elections has passed the National Assembly, containing voting rights for Contra leaders and some safeguards against fraud but with a built-in edge for the ruling Sandinistas on the campaign trail. While criticizing the new legislation as flawed, opposition leaders said Thursday they expect it to be improved with amendments as part of negotiations to end the six-year-old war here.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The economic adviser to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro said Thursday that Nicaragua will immediately need $600 million to $800 million to rebuild its fragile economy. He also called for re-entry rights to the United States for Nicaraguan emigres who return to help rebuild their homeland. In meetings on Capitol Hill, Francisco Mayorga outlined the new government's needs, according to Rep. Dante Fascell (D-Fla.), chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Militants seized control of a radio station and City Hall on Tuesday to protest a move to revoke laws that gave thousands of Sandinistas free property in the final months of their decade of rule. No one was seriously hurt in the takeovers at Radio Corporacion, a rightist station, and at City Hall. In both cases, masked men identifying themselves as Sandinistas forced their way into the buildings and vowed to remain inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1985
Is the State Department happy about the suspending of some freedoms in Managua? It seems to be. After all, these rights were instituted by the revolution, they did not exist under Somoza. Only when we hear they are suspended do we learn they existed! Now we learn Sandinista Nicaragua has laws protecting the "right of speedy trial for criminals," the "right to appeal judicial sentences," the "right to protect people against police authority to search homes," the "right to strike."
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The economic adviser to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro said Thursday that Nicaragua will immediately need $600 million to $800 million to rebuild its fragile economy. He also called for re-entry rights to the United States for Nicaraguan emigres who return to help rebuild their homeland. In meetings on Capitol Hill, Francisco Mayorga outlined the new government's needs, according to Rep. Dante Fascell (D-Fla.), chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Tuesday approved $9 million to help the Nicaraguan opposition in that country's elections, but only after President Bush persuaded conservative senators to put aside fears that the vote could be used against them in negative campaign commercials. The senators' anxiety was laced with irony: several of them, including North Carolina Republican Jesse Helms, were among the earliest and most unrestrained users of the 30-second political rabbit punches they now fear.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
A law governing future Nicaraguan elections has passed the National Assembly, containing voting rights for Contra leaders and some safeguards against fraud but with a built-in edge for the ruling Sandinistas on the campaign trail. While criticizing the new legislation as flawed, opposition leaders said Thursday they expect it to be improved with amendments as part of negotiations to end the six-year-old war here.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
The Sandinista-dominated National Assembly passed a law Saturday enabling the government to eventually free more than 3,000 political prisoners under the truce agreement signed by the government last week with leaders of the U.S.-backed Contras. Those to be released include 1,837 members of the old Nicaraguan National Guard, which the Sandinistas fought in a bitter guerrilla war that finally brought them to power in 1979.
NEWS
September 7, 1987
Hundreds of demonstrators staged a peaceful rally in Chinandega, 50 miles northwest of Managua, Nicaragua, to demand that the left-wing Sandinista government restore constitutional rights, as advocated by a recently signed regional peace accord. Police with rubber truncheons stood by but did not interfere.
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