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Nicholas Ray

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July 28, 2011 | By Steve Ryfle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Nicholas Ray faced a roomful of film students. They had come to learn from the director who'd made James Dean an icon in "Rebel Without a Cause" and a gunslinger of Joan Crawford in the distaff western "Johnny Guitar. " Ray began a mock exercise in filming a scene and the reverential students waited for his instructions — and they waited. Ray fell inexplicably silent. Minutes passed, then hours, and finally the students left, bewildered by the tall, frail man with an eye patch and wild, white hair.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Dennis Lim
Nicholas Ray was a countercultural figure before the fact, a 1960s maverick in 1950s Hollywood. He was also a prime exhibit in the midcentury school of auteurist film criticism, which emphasized and embraced the personal signatures of directors working within an industrial system. Writing in Cahiers du Cinema a few years before making his own directorial debut, Jean-Luc Godard declared that he found in Ray's work the very essence of the medium: "Le cinema, c'est Nicholas Ray. " It's not hard to see why Ray's films - intense, volatile, verging on pop-art brashness in their stylization - would speak so strongly to the up-and-coming iconoclasts of the French New Wave.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011
Nicholas Ray: The Glorious Failure of an American Director Patrick McGilligan It! Books: 560 pages, $29.99
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011
Nicholas Ray: The Glorious Failure of an American Director Patrick McGilligan It! Books: 560 pages, $29.99
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The Harry Ransom Center of the University of Texas at Austin has acquired the archives of Nicholas Ray, the director of such classic film noirs as 1950's "In a Lonely Place" and 1952's "On Dangerous Ground," and of 1955's seminal troubled youth melodrama, "Rebel Without a Cause," which transformed James Dean into a spokesperson for his generation. The archives include scripts, storyboards and correspondence. "There are about a dozen document boxes," said Steve Wilson, film curator of the Harry Ransom Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Dennis Lim
Nicholas Ray was a countercultural figure before the fact, a 1960s maverick in 1950s Hollywood. He was also a prime exhibit in the midcentury school of auteurist film criticism, which emphasized and embraced the personal signatures of directors working within an industrial system. Writing in Cahiers du Cinema a few years before making his own directorial debut, Jean-Luc Godard declared that he found in Ray's work the very essence of the medium: "Le cinema, c'est Nicholas Ray. " It's not hard to see why Ray's films - intense, volatile, verging on pop-art brashness in their stylization - would speak so strongly to the up-and-coming iconoclasts of the French New Wave.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
ICONOCLASTIC American director Nicholas Ray tapped into the post-World War II existential blues in a series of uncompromising films he made from the late 1940s through the '50s. Though critics and audiences of the time unjustly neglected many of his films, Ray's stock soared in subsequent decades, especially after he was warmly embraced by French New Wave filmmakers such as Francois Truffaut and by contemporary directors including Jim Jarmusch and Wim Wenders.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011
Nicholas Ray Centennial When: 7:30 p.m., Aug. 3 ("Rebel Without a Cause") Where: Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood When: 7:30 p.m., Aug. 5 ("Johnny Guitar," "In a Lonely Place"); 7:30 p.m., Aug. 7 ("Bigger Than Life," "Knock on Any Door") Where: Aero Theatre, 1328 Montana Ave., Santa Monica Price: $11 general; $9 seniors and students Info: http://www.americancinematheque.com
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Steve Ryfle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Nicholas Ray faced a roomful of film students. They had come to learn from the director who'd made James Dean an icon in "Rebel Without a Cause" and a gunslinger of Joan Crawford in the distaff western "Johnny Guitar. " Ray began a mock exercise in filming a scene and the reverential students waited for his instructions — and they waited. Ray fell inexplicably silent. Minutes passed, then hours, and finally the students left, bewildered by the tall, frail man with an eye patch and wild, white hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The Harry Ransom Center of the University of Texas at Austin has acquired the archives of Nicholas Ray, the director of such classic film noirs as 1950's "In a Lonely Place" and 1952's "On Dangerous Ground," and of 1955's seminal troubled youth melodrama, "Rebel Without a Cause," which transformed James Dean into a spokesperson for his generation. The archives include scripts, storyboards and correspondence. "There are about a dozen document boxes," said Steve Wilson, film curator of the Harry Ransom Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Sam Adams
Nicholas Ray's "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955) laid down the template for teenage rebellion in the 1950s, but the rebel in Ray's "Bigger Than Life," released the following year and out on DVD and Blu-ray from the Criterion Collection this week, is in a distinctly less romantic vein. James Mason is the picture of small-town rectitude, a soft-hearted teacher with a modest house, wife and child, until a life-threatening illness puts him on regular doses of the recently discovered "miracle drug" cortisone.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
ICONOCLASTIC American director Nicholas Ray tapped into the post-World War II existential blues in a series of uncompromising films he made from the late 1940s through the '50s. Though critics and audiences of the time unjustly neglected many of his films, Ray's stock soared in subsequent decades, especially after he was warmly embraced by French New Wave filmmakers such as Francois Truffaut and by contemporary directors including Jim Jarmusch and Wim Wenders.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Gloria Grahame and director Nicholas Ray absolutely define the 1950s. Their place in the Hollywood sun was brief, but their legacy and influence have eclipsed actors and directors who were far more popular during that decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Macao." Nostalgia Merchant. $19.95. For most people, this 1952 film will simply play as a dull, set-bound, would-be exotic thriller, with nothing much to recommend it but the usual lazily expert Robert Mitchum lead performance and a few atmospheric shots of net-swept piers. Devotees of directorial style, however, may have fun with it: Half the movie was directed by Josef Von Sternberg and half was re-shot (uncredited, at producer Howard Hughes' behest) by Nicholas Ray. Who did what?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque launches its "Shoot Out the Lights: The Films of Nicholas Ray" Friday at 7:15 p.m. at the Directors Guild with the iconoclastic director's most famous film, "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955). In his first film, James Dean instantly became an icon for a generation, the definitive misunderstood youth.
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