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Nick Adenhart

SPORTS
April 18, 2009 | Dan Connolly and Mike DiGiovanna
Catching his breath every few moments, Jim Adenhart explained to the hushed crowd that the greatest day of his life was when his nine-pound, three-ounce baby boy was born. Then, in detail, he relayed his final conversation with his son last week, after Nick Adenhart had pitched the best game of his brief major league career.
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SPORTS
April 17, 2009 | Dan Connolly and Mike DiGiovanna
On a crisp, cloudless morning, a tight-knit rural community and a contingent of major league baseball personnel from Southern California joined together at a quaint, red-brick church to honor a young man who bridged divergent worlds. Nicholas James "Nick" Adenhart, the 22-year-old Angels right-hander from western Maryland who was killed last week in a car accident, was buried Thursday after a private service attended by about 200 people.
SPORTS
April 17, 2009 | KURT STREETER
Jaw tight, eyes wet and firm and full of courage, Areta Pearson strode toward the field where her late son had spent so many of his youthful afternoons. She gripped a baseball tightly. She rocked back and leaned forward and flung it. This first pitch, a strike, was the symbolic start of a hard and heartfelt memorial Thursday; a celebration of the life of Areta and Nigel Pearson's only son, Henry. Henry Pearson died last week, too young, too soon, at 25.
SPORTS
April 16, 2009 | MIKE DIGIOVANNA
An 11-3 loss to Seattle in Safeco Field, a game in which Ichiro Suzuki capped the Mariners' seven-run seventh inning with a grand slam, was the least of the Angels' concerns Wednesday night. When seven members of your organization are about to fly from Seattle to the Baltimore area to attend a private memorial service for Nick Adenhart, the 22-year-old Angels pitcher who was killed in a traffic accident last Thursday, how can you get too worked up about a baseball game?
SPORTS
April 15, 2009 | T.J. SIMERS
It never crossed my mind. Not even for a second did I think about writing anything here last week on this subject. I knew Nick Adenhart as well as I did "the others," as so many newspapers reported their three deaths, which is to say we never met. I only knew the three of them as kids, gone by no fault of their own, and was privately stewing about it. And then came an e-mail from Ty Cesene, a newspaper reader, and who knew there were folks out there still counting on a newspaper.
SPORTS
April 12, 2009 | Mike DiGiovanna
Reggie Willits joined the Angels on Saturday after a roster move that will forever link the outfielder with Nick Adenhart, the 22-year-old pitcher who was killed in a traffic accident early Thursday. Though Willits is not replacing Adenhart in the rotation -- that task probably will fall on the shoulders of triple-A right-hander Anthony Ortega, who is expected to be called up later this week -- Willits couldn't help but feel a little guilt.
SPORTS
April 11, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
Terry Francona has been in tight games and routs. He has managed in the playoffs, the World Series and the All-Star game more than once. So there isn't too much the Boston Red Sox skipper hasn't seen in his 20 years in a major league dugout. But Friday night's game at Angel Stadium, he admitted beforehand, was uncharted territory. Never before had he taken on a team that was grieving over the death of one of its players.
SPORTS
April 11, 2009 | BILL SHAIKIN, ON BASEBALL
As the sounds of silence enveloped the clubhouse, Mike Matheny retrieved a watch from his locker. There is no right way to face sudden death, in life or in baseball. There is no way at all to predict how the Angels might respond to the death of Nick Adenhart, to play out a season over which they have lost all emotional control. Darryl Kile died of a heart attack seven years ago, in the middle of the season. The St.
SPORTS
April 11, 2009 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, ON THE ANGELS
Tight hamstrings, sore knees, tired arms . . . the Angels are used to coping with such nagging injuries. Friday night, they took the field with heavy hearts. Playing their first game without fallen teammate Nick Adenhart, the 22-year-old pitcher who was killed along with two friends in a traffic accident early Thursday, the Angels took a 2 1/2 -hour break from mourning to beat the Boston Red Sox, 6-3, in Angel Stadium.
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