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Nick Gomez

ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Drowning Mona" takes a fresh and funny spin on the classic mystery plot in which someone is so universally loathed that practically everyone is a credible suspect. With an inspired and frequently hilarious script by newcomer Peter Steinfeld, director Nick Gomez, in his fourth feature, has done his best work since his knockout 1991 first feature, "Laws of Gravity," a gritty take on a pair of feckless Brooklyn thieves.
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SPORTS
May 31, 2000 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, there was no comeback for El Camino Real High. This time, one wasn't necessary. The Conquistadores won the hard way in a first-round squeaker last week, but they had no problems in an 8-2 victory over San Pedro in a City Championship baseball quarterfinal Tuesday at Harbor College. The game was technically an upset--San Pedro was seeded No. 3 while the Conquistadores were No. 6--but El Camino Real dominated, smacking four two-run home runs and never fretting.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Island in Hal Hartley's "Trust" (selected theaters) is a bleak, grayed-out landscape peopled by blank, enraged oddballs. Hartley has such a spare, controlled touch in this film that this landscape seems both realistic and fantastic. He expresses a recognizably modern suburban Angst and yet everything he shows us is out of kilter and personalized. It's a documentary of the Long Island landscape as the director's mindscape.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Skeptic is my middle name. So when I encountered Joline Godfrey and her book about women entrepreneurs, "Our Wildest Dreams," I thought, "Oh no, another one of those superficial, full of platitudes books." Not this time. Godfrey, on Ojai resident, has written a wonderful, witty, the-way-it-is/the-way-it-can-be book about and for anyone in business. Her credentials include 10 years through the ranks at Polaroid. The firm backed her when she spun off her own company, which she sold in 1990.
SPORTS
March 11, 2000 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beau Savage remembers the disappointment well. He was told last year during one of the first practices that he wasn't needed. His skills weren't good enough to play varsity baseball at El Camino Real High. He decided against joining the junior varsity and skipped the season entirely. But he tried out again this season, made the team and is having an impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
In the new Lifetime original movie "Lizzie Borden Took an Ax," the protagonist's name is uttered in full many times throughout the film's 87 minutes. She isn't called "Lizzie" or "Miss Borden" but "Lizzie Borden. " The notorious name strikes tactical blows on the viewer's psyche, conjuring bits of legend, myth and contested story lines about the accused murderess' storied life. The movie, which airs Jan. 25, stars Christina Ricci, last seen on TV in the short-lived ABC series "Pan Am," a 1960s period piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In the midst of television's last golden age, a creepy and effective telling of the infamous Lizzie Borden case blew out the walls of both the TV movie and the historical crime drama. "The Legend of Lizzie Borden" starred Elizabeth Montgomery, who in 1975 was firmly entrenched in American hearts as the sweet-faced, nose-twitching Samantha Stephens from "Bewitched. " To see her as a grimly corseted spinster sweltering under the heat of a New England summer and her family's penny-pinching morality was shocking enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
When Toronto and Montreal, the sibling rivals of Canadian cities, both started film festivals within a year of each other in the mid-1970s, all the odds for lasting success seemed to favor Montreal. That city was exciting and romantic, possessed of both European sophistication and the glamour of a French-speaking population, while Toronto was, well, Toronto. While the Montreal festival has done fine, thank you very much, it pales before the 335-film colossus that is Toronto.
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