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Nick Nolte

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NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Socrates, knock it off! We're not playing soccer now!" Nick Nolte has not lost his mind. He is shooing away one of his ebullient dogs during an interview on his sunny Malibu patio. The gravel-voiced 70-year-old earned his third Oscar nomination this year, for supporting actor for his gut-wrenching turn in the mixed martial arts-themed family drama "Warrior. " Fortunately, he's considerably sunnier in person than as his "Warrior" character: the remorseful, recovering-alcoholic father Paddy Conlon.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Actor Nick Nolte has put a Malibu compound up for sale that has seen a galaxy of stars come through its arched entryway. Besides Nolte, other notables to have owned the house include comedian Tommy Chong, Don Felder of the Eagles and music producer David Foster. Priced at $8.25 million and set in the Bonsall Canyon area, the two-acre retreat is covered with sycamore and pine trees. The main house, built in 1963, features 19-foot vaulted ceilings, skylights, six stone-and-carved-wood fireplaces, marble floors and mahogany French doors.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Actor Nick Nolte's celebrity pedigree home in Malibu is for sale at $8.25 million. Among former film and music industry figures to own the house are comedian Tommy Chong, Don Felder of the Eagles and music producer David Foster. Set in the Bonsall Canyon area on two acres studded with sycamore and pine trees, the main house features  19-foot vaulted ceilings, skylights, six fireplaces, marble floors and mahogany French doors. There are four bedrooms including the master suite, which has its own sitting area, office and library, and two of the fireplaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Melancholy and middle America aren't usually seen in the rom-com world. In "Arthur Newman," a romantic comedy that unfolds during a road trip to Terra Haute, Ind., they are refreshingly unexpected elements that soften us up for the rough patches the film hits along the way. Also working in the film's favor are Colin Firth and Emily Blunt, both well-versed in comedy and about as appealing on screen as actors come. They star as a couple of depressed souls whose paths cross one night at the edge of a seedy motel swimming pool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors filed two misdemeanor charges Wednesday against actor Nick Nolte stemming from his arrest last month in Malibu. Nolte, 61, faces one count of driving under the influence and one count of being under the influence of a controlled substance, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Prosecutors believe that Nolte had taken gamma-hydroxybutyrate, also known as GHB, before he was stopped along Pacific Coast Highway while driving erratically Sept. 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors filed two misdemeanor charges Wednesday against actor Nick Nolte stemming from his arrest last month in Malibu. Nolte, 61, faces one count of drunk driving and one count of being under the influence of a controlled substance, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Prosecutors believe Nolte had taken gamma-hydroxybutyrate, also known as GHB, before he was stopped on Pacific Coast Highway while driving erratically Sept. 11.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | PETER RAINER, Peter Rainer is a Times staff writer. and
As Tom Wingo in "The Prince of Tides," Nick Nolte is playing a character who is trying to close himself off from his own pain. "I was a champion at keeping secrets," he says, but he isn't really. Tom may have the thickened look of a superannuated golden-boy jock, and he may sport his Southernness like a medallion. But his hulky jauntiness can't disguise the stricken look behind his eyes, or the way his face slackens into an aghast mask when the sorrows cut too deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1991 | Nikki Finke
Ever since word got out that Barbra Streisand was going to direct Nick Nolte and star in Pat Conroy's beloved book "The Prince of Tides," Hollywood has been unusually curious about how the pairing would turn out. Well, results from the first research screenings are in, and unofficial word is that the movie is very good, and Nick Nolte is great.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Weeds" (selected theaters) is a wonderful movie for Nick Nolte. Not since "North Dallas Forty," in which he was a battered pro football player, has Nolte had a movie that allowed him to be so completely the star. "Weeds" makes full use of his brawny masculine presence yet demands that he dig deep into his resources as an actor, and the result is a large-scale, emotion-charged performance. Gratifyingly, the rest of the film is up to Nolte's level.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
If the rumors of discontent on the set of Julia Roberts' new film, "I Love Trouble," are to be believed, the film couldn't be more aptly named. Joe Roth's Caravan Pictures film, which also stars Nick Nolte under the direction of Charles Shyer, is about two dueling Chicago reporters chasing the scoop of a lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
- When Emily Blunt was in grade school and Colin Firth was still a struggling actor, Becky Johnston was penning their characters in the first draft of a screenplay that would become "Arthur Newman. " Twenty years later, it is finally a movie, opening Friday, a meditation on identity guised in a road trip featuring two lost souls grappling with their unenviable realities. FOR THE RECORD: "Arthur Newman": An article about the film "Arthur Newman" in the April 24 Calendar section said that the movie was the first that Colin Firth signed onto after winning an Oscar for "The King's Speech.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Actor Nick Nolte's celebrity pedigree home in Malibu is for sale at $8.25 million. Among former film and music industry figures to own the house are comedian Tommy Chong, Don Felder of the Eagles and music producer David Foster. Set in the Bonsall Canyon area on two acres studded with sycamore and pine trees, the main house features  19-foot vaulted ceilings, skylights, six fireplaces, marble floors and mahogany French doors. There are four bedrooms including the master suite, which has its own sitting area, office and library, and two of the fireplaces.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Socrates, knock it off! We're not playing soccer now!" Nick Nolte has not lost his mind. He is shooing away one of his ebullient dogs during an interview on his sunny Malibu patio. The gravel-voiced 70-year-old earned his third Oscar nomination this year, for supporting actor for his gut-wrenching turn in the mixed martial arts-themed family drama "Warrior. " Fortunately, he's considerably sunnier in person than as his "Warrior" character: the remorseful, recovering-alcoholic father Paddy Conlon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2009 | Martin Miller
Plenty of films have tackled the darker side of sports, but few can match the ferocity of 1979's "North Dallas Forty" in ripping the systemic dehumanizition of players in big-time professional sports. In the movie, adapted from Peter Gent's novel and directed by Ted Kotcheff, the players -- for all their hulk, swagger and fame -- are in the end victims of coaches and corporations whose collective vanity fuels a soul-crushing pursuit of perfection and victory. Despite its seriousness, the film is also among the funniest sports movies ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2008 | Betsy Sharkey
Watching a bloated and beaten Mickey Rourke in "The Wrestler," it's hard not to be reminded at some point of Nick Nolte in "North Dallas Forty"-- a couple of damaged souls on screen and off, exposed for everyone to see. There is a reckless fierceness, a raw vulnerability in Rourke's performance that makes it hard to look at and just as hard to look away. But if he can go there, so can we.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
CANNES, France -- Celebrity interviews abound at the Cannes Film Festival: Penelope Cruz chatting on the beach, Harrison Ford talking near the red carpet, Angelina Jolie conversing in a swank hotel. But none of the Cannes dialogues is as strange as Nick Nolte's: He's actually interrogating himself in a small room.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Murphy may have been a novice movie actor when he made "48 HRS." eight years ago, but he had a crackerjack presence that cut like an acetylene torch through the film's engineered tumult. In the sequel, "Another 48 HRS.," Murphy still has his crack timing and a comic assuredness that almost passes for dramatic authority. In the intervening eight years, Murphy has become a great big movie star, and his career, except in a commercial sense, hasn't improved on his work in that first film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | Bob Baker, Special to The Times
On first blush, "Vice" should have been titled "Not Another Cop Movie." All the predictable hallmarks are here: Cops and drug-dealing gang members spew F-bombs and N-bombs and kill one another gratuitously. They mutter corny insights like, "I'm close to the edge." Cornered, they turn on their own. It feels like you're playing "Grand Theft Auto." But in walks Michael Madsen, he of "Reservoir Dogs" and "Kill Bill," as vice cop Max Walker, and suddenly the game has a soul worth saving.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, orphans were the preferred protagonists in tales of fantasy and adventure, whether they were named Cinderella, Superman or Harry Potter. But in "The Spiderwick Chronicles," which opens Feb.15, the young heroes are grappling not just with goblins, but with the wrenching split-up of their parents.
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