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Nickelodeon

BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Despite a vexing ratings slump at its children's network Nickelodeon, Viacom Inc.'s second-quarter profit soared 56%. The strong earnings were produced by higher fees from pay-television operators and lower expenses at the media company's Paramount Pictures movie studio. For the quarter ended March 31, Viacom earned $585 million, or $1.07 a share, up from $376 million, or 63 cents, a year earlier. Revenue grew 2% to $3.33 billion. "Across our divisions we sharpened our focus on execution and efficiency while continuing to invest in programming," Viacom Chief Executive Philippe Dauman told analysts in a Thursday morning conference call.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For its latest, hour-long TV movie, "A Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy Turner," Nickelodeon has taken its venerable cartoon series "The Fairly OddParents" and blown it up, like a balloon, into three plump dimensions. Godparent fairies Wanda and Cosmo and their baby fairy Poof are rendered rounded in CG animation; real people play the other parts. The second significant change is that Timmy, the fairy-protected protagonist of the piece, is no longer a 10-year-old fifth-grader. He is now a 23-year-old fifth-grader, living at home and sleeping in horsey pajamas, having contrived not to grow up in order not to lose his fairy pals, to whom he is closer than his own ridiculous — one wants to say, "cartoonish" — parents.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2004 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Chalk one up for SpongeBob. Nickelodeon, home of the top-rated kids' show "SpongeBob SquarePants," has pulled off an unusual maneuver that probably will reshuffle the cable network ratings and hurt rivals such as Lifetime, USA Network and TNT. For years, Nickelodeon, which reaches more than 85 million U.S.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Geraldine Laybourne, the executive who built Nickelodeon into the top-rated 24-hour cable network and one of the most profitable channels, is leaving Viacom Inc. to head the cable programming efforts of the combined Walt Disney Co. and Capital Cities/ABC Inc.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viacom Inc. signed a landmark deal this week to launch Nickelodeon in 40 million Chinese households May 1, marking the second time the entertainment company has been allowed by the Beijing government to take its U.S. brands into Chinese homes. Under a 3-year-old pact, Viacom is already bringing MTV to 54 million households in China, the world's largest television market based on the 300 million homes with TV sets. That is three times as many television households as in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Wallykazam!," you might have guessed from the title, is a show for young people. Premiering Monday afternoon on Nickelodeon, it is a preschool, literacy-based cartoon that essentially takes a "Sesame Street" sound-of-this-letter blackout and works it into a 22-minute story. Wally is a 6-year-old troll with a puppyish pet dragon named Norville, evidently a graduate of the Scooby-Doo School of Diction, and a magic stick that can create things out of thin air, but only if they begin with the letter-sound of the day. (It's like a supernatural Enigma machine.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Sanjay and Craig," which premieres Saturday (tonight) on Nickelodeon, follows the adventures of a boy named Sanjay, voiced by Maulik Pancholy of "30 Rock," and his best friend, a talking snake named Craig, voiced by Chris Hardwick, the Nerdist. Linda Cardellini and Tony Hale are also voices on the show. Among other things, the goofy and delightful series represents the joining of two great names from the golden age of Nick with three as-yet obscure names from its possible future.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Viacom's hyper-competitive chairman, Sumner Redstone, wasn't happy to learn recently that Walt Disney has an animated movie version of the children's animated TV series "Doug" coming out this month. It still sticks in the media mogul's craw that Viacom's hip family label, Nickelodeon, dropped the ball three years ago and let Disney get hold of one of its top-rated programs and coveted kids' franchises.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Nickelodeon, the cable TV network for children, asked 11-year-old Emily Frlekin to take part in a marketing research project, she thought it sounded terrific. So did her mom, Angela. For Emily, who lives in North Hollywood, it was a chance to earn a $100 savings bond--and brag to friends that her opinions on everything from new TV shows to fashions were important to Nickelodeon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2007 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Atop the Nickelodeon studios in Burbank is a larger-than-life cavalcade of the cable network's signature animated characters. SpongeBob SquarePants is up there. So is Dora the Explorer, as well as a handful of others. Joining them soon, hope the network's executives, will be Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private -- the raucously comic penguins from the DreamWorks Animation film "Madagascar." Thanks to their Viacom Inc.
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