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Nickelodeon

BUSINESS
December 16, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Geraldine Laybourne, the executive who built Nickelodeon into the top-rated 24-hour cable network and one of the most profitable channels, is leaving Viacom Inc. to head the cable programming efforts of the combined Walt Disney Co. and Capital Cities/ABC Inc.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viacom Inc. signed a landmark deal this week to launch Nickelodeon in 40 million Chinese households May 1, marking the second time the entertainment company has been allowed by the Beijing government to take its U.S. brands into Chinese homes. Under a 3-year-old pact, Viacom is already bringing MTV to 54 million households in China, the world's largest television market based on the 300 million homes with TV sets. That is three times as many television households as in the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Nickelodeon, the cable TV network for children, asked 11-year-old Emily Frlekin to take part in a marketing research project, she thought it sounded terrific. So did her mom, Angela. For Emily, who lives in North Hollywood, it was a chance to earn a $100 savings bond--and brag to friends that her opinions on everything from new TV shows to fashions were important to Nickelodeon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2007 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Atop the Nickelodeon studios in Burbank is a larger-than-life cavalcade of the cable network's signature animated characters. SpongeBob SquarePants is up there. So is Dora the Explorer, as well as a handful of others. Joining them soon, hope the network's executives, will be Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private -- the raucously comic penguins from the DreamWorks Animation film "Madagascar." Thanks to their Viacom Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | WYNNE EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The line for autographs from singer Aaron Carter wrapped nearly all the way around the Nickelodeon Kidway at the All That Music & More Festival here. Marlee Fritz, of nearby Freeport, Pa., waited in line more than half an hour to meet the new, hot preteen idol. "I love him," she squealed. But he's only 11. "I'm only 11," she said.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writers Guild of America members today plan to picket outside the Burbank studios of cable network Nickelodeon, a day after the union complained to the National Labor Relations Board that network supervisors have been obstructing efforts to organize writers on six animated shows. Wednesday's complaint was the third filed by the WGA in two months.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1998 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the biggest names in children's television, Nickelodeon and Children's Television Workshop, paired up Tuesday to announce the creation of a noncommercial cable channel aimed at providing educational programming for kids between the ages of 2 and 14--including reruns of "Sesame Street."
BUSINESS
June 27, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Paramount Pictures plans a sweeping reorganization that will bring in house its two sister movie operations, MTV Films and Nickelodeon Movies, as part of an effort to end what has frequently been viewed as a dysfunctional relationship. Although all three are owned by parent Viacom Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Sanjay and Craig," which premieres Saturday (tonight) on Nickelodeon, follows the adventures of a boy named Sanjay, voiced by Maulik Pancholy of "30 Rock," and his best friend, a talking snake named Craig, voiced by Chris Hardwick, the Nerdist. Linda Cardellini and Tony Hale are also voices on the show. Among other things, the goofy and delightful series represents the joining of two great names from the golden age of Nick with three as-yet obscure names from its possible future.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the cable TV channel Nickelodeon set out three years ago to build an original library of children's cartoons, it did so by breaking from tradition and hiring single animators with a personal vision rather than large studios where cartoons are factory produced. But one animator's vision, independent attitude and exacting work habits wound up being a little more than Nickelodeon bargained for.
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