Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNigeria Armed Forces
IN THE NEWS

Nigeria Armed Forces

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nigeria's president urged his country's military brass to distribute free condoms to the armed forces to help fight the spread of AIDS, a newspaper reported. "We must not allow HIV/AIDS to ravage our armed forces," the Guardian newspaper quoted Olusegun Obasanjo as telling military commanders and troops in the southwestern city of Ibadan. An estimated 5.4% of Nigerians are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The figure is believed to be higher in the military.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nigeria's president urged his country's military brass to distribute free condoms to the armed forces to help fight the spread of AIDS, a newspaper reported. "We must not allow HIV/AIDS to ravage our armed forces," the Guardian newspaper quoted Olusegun Obasanjo as telling military commanders and troops in the southwestern city of Ibadan. An estimated 5.4% of Nigerians are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The figure is believed to be higher in the military.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The military junta has arrested the leader of a human rights group that led several recent protests against the regime. Olisa Agbakoba, chairman of United Action for Democracy, was seized by police at the international airport in Lagos upon his return from Ghana, the group said in a statement. Police declined to comment. The group claimed responsibility for an anti-government protest in the southwestern city of Ibadan last week that left seven people dead and dozens of cars and homes burned.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a tiring day in this bustling city, people used to rush to the one northern suburb to be home by 8 p.m. Delay meant a long detour. The main road to their neighborhood ran past military barracks, and at that hour, an imposing iron gate swung shut. Intimidating armed soldiers stood guard. During years of military rule, timid pleas to remove the gate fell on deaf ears. With the installation of a civilian administration almost two years ago, there were further requests.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
West African leaders agreed to send 3,000 troops to Sierra Leone to help U.N. peacekeepers who have suffered rebel attacks and seen their colleagues kidnapped. Although a statement released by the heads of state meeting in Abuja, the Nigerian capital, did not specify how many troops would be sent, officials at the conference said on condition of anonymity that leaders had endorsed a proposal made by regional defense ministers two weeks ago to send 3,000 soldiers, most of them Nigerian.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the Clinton administration offering economic and technical support, West African leaders agreed Tuesday to consider sending a Nigerian-led military force to restore order in Sierra Leone, a step that would amount to a vote of no confidence in beleaguered U.N. peacekeepers.
NEWS
September 1, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear Nigeria's top officials tell it, President Clinton and other concerned Western leaders need not worry about gross human rights abuses and jailing of political prisoners by the military clique that controls Africa's most populous nation. "No one is held in Nigeria for his political views," Foreign Minister Tom Ikimi told reporters here Thursday. "No one is held because he is a journalist or because of his writing." Ikimi said it is impossible for Gen.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Unpaid soldiers mutinied Friday and seized the state radio station and two civilian leaders. They freed the hostages after being promised back pay, but hours later took over the broadcast center again. No casualties were reported, though thousands of students marched into town to protest the revolt. Mutineers' demands have included the immediate return to the capital of Prime Minister Amadou Cheffou, who is away; dismissal of several army officers and release of another officer from prison.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 11 people were reported killed in Lagos as tens of thousands of people set fires and blocked roads to demand an end to military dictatorship. It was the first report of deaths since Lagos protesters began pressuring the government on Monday to recognize the annulled June 12 presidential election that was to end a decade of military rule. The reported winner, businessman Moshood K. O. Abiola, appealed to people to resist the dictatorship of Gen.
NEWS
July 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The military government secretly organized the lawsuits that derailed the June 12 elections so the army could keep power, a top official with the group that filed the suits said. The stunning disclosure bolstered critics who have contended that the military ruler, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida, was orchestrating political chaos to keep from stepping down Aug. 27 as promised. Abimola Davis, No.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
West African leaders agreed to send 3,000 troops to Sierra Leone to help U.N. peacekeepers who have suffered rebel attacks and seen their colleagues kidnapped. Although a statement released by the heads of state meeting in Abuja, the Nigerian capital, did not specify how many troops would be sent, officials at the conference said on condition of anonymity that leaders had endorsed a proposal made by regional defense ministers two weeks ago to send 3,000 soldiers, most of them Nigerian.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the Clinton administration offering economic and technical support, West African leaders agreed Tuesday to consider sending a Nigerian-led military force to restore order in Sierra Leone, a step that would amount to a vote of no confidence in beleaguered U.N. peacekeepers.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear southern Nigerians tell it, the people from the North in this populous West African nation are to blame for the military's long stranglehold on power. Generals from the mostly conservative Hausa and Fulani northern clans have held tightly to control, southerners maintain, draining the South of its oil wealth and other resources and giving nothing in return to its dominant Yoruba group and ethnic minorities.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fatal rioting rocked Nigeria and its military leader dissolved his Cabinet, analysts said Wednesday that the death of Moshood Abiola, the nation's most prominent political prisoner, has complicated and probably delayed prospects for a peaceful push for democracy there. Foes of the Nigerian military regime, observers said, now must scramble to find another figurehead for their struggle against political and civil injustice, after Abiola died Tuesday from what was apparently a heart attack.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The military junta has arrested the leader of a human rights group that led several recent protests against the regime. Olisa Agbakoba, chairman of United Action for Democracy, was seized by police at the international airport in Lagos upon his return from Ghana, the group said in a statement. Police declined to comment. The group claimed responsibility for an anti-government protest in the southwestern city of Ibadan last week that left seven people dead and dozens of cars and homes burned.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton and other world leaders consider imposing harsh sanctions on Nigeria's military dictatorship following the executions of nine political activists, several crucial questions loom. Can Gen. Sani Abacha, who marked his second anniversary in power Friday, be persuaded to step down? Will the army, which has run Nigeria at gunpoint for 25 of the last 35 years, finally return to the barracks? If democracy is restored, can it be sustained?
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear southern Nigerians tell it, the people from the North in this populous West African nation are to blame for the military's long stranglehold on power. Generals from the mostly conservative Hausa and Fulani northern clans have held tightly to control, southerners maintain, draining the South of its oil wealth and other resources and giving nothing in return to its dominant Yoruba group and ethnic minorities.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The nation's military ruler on Saturday announced new Nigerian presidential elections to replace the June 12 balloting he annulled, and he barred the two candidates who ran earlier from running again. Gen. Ibrahim Babangida made the startling announcement in his first nationwide television address since he abruptly voided the election, which was contested by two wealthy friends whose parties he created. He gave no date for the elections.
NEWS
September 1, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear Nigeria's top officials tell it, President Clinton and other concerned Western leaders need not worry about gross human rights abuses and jailing of political prisoners by the military clique that controls Africa's most populous nation. "No one is held in Nigeria for his political views," Foreign Minister Tom Ikimi told reporters here Thursday. "No one is held because he is a journalist or because of his writing." Ikimi said it is impossible for Gen.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
This loud, chaotic city of 6 million people was desolate and silent Thursday except for the whir of army helicopters and clomp of combat boots worn by edgy soldiers. Nearly everyone in Lagos appeared to heed a national strike to protest the nullification of an election that was to return Nigeria to civilian rule after a decade of military dictatorship. Nigeria's second-biggest city, Ibadan, 80 miles north of Lagos, was also at a virtual standstill, residents said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|