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Nigeria Politics

NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
An estimated 4 million workers were ordered to go on strike Saturday in a bid to force out this West African nation's military-backed government. On Thursday, dictator Gen. Ibrahim Babangida resigned under pressure, but he left behind a government of civilian supporters who promised to hold new elections early next year. Many Nigerians want the interim government to install tycoon Moshood K. O.
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NEWS
July 21, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's military ruler sought Monday to end years of terrible turmoil in the oil-rich, strategically important nation, offering a program of political and economic reforms and a pledge that the junta here will hand over power to a democratically elected civilian government by May 29. Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar, who succeeded Gen.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
The nation's military ruler on Saturday announced new Nigerian presidential elections to replace the June 12 balloting he annulled, and he barred the two candidates who ran earlier from running again. Gen. Ibrahim Babangida made the startling announcement in his first nationwide television address since he abruptly voided the election, which was contested by two wealthy friends whose parties he created. He gave no date for the elections.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Gen. Sani Abacha, Nigeria's new military ruler, dissolved the country's two political parties and all democratically elected bodies Thursday in the most sweeping changes in Nigeria in a decade. In a 10-minute broadcast, his first since assuming office Wednesday, the military strongman said national and state assemblies, state governments, local councils and the National Electoral Commission were dissolved, and political meetings and associations were banned.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Riots and protests flared anew Thursday over the death of the country's most prominent political prisoner, and the ruling military council put off a final decision on restoring democracy. The council said a small working group will report to leader Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar in a few days. It also commuted death sentences handed down against six men convicted of plotting to overthrow the country's former dictator.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | From Reuters
The military government faced more pressure Saturday after the country's biggest labor federation called a general strike to back a pro-democracy campaign. Workers in the oil industry, Nigeria's economic lifeblood, launched the campaign four weeks ago with a crippling strike to demand the release of detained politician Moshood K. O. Abiola and a return to democratic rule.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fatal rioting rocked Nigeria and its military leader dissolved his Cabinet, analysts said Wednesday that the death of Moshood Abiola, the nation's most prominent political prisoner, has complicated and probably delayed prospects for a peaceful push for democracy there. Foes of the Nigerian military regime, observers said, now must scramble to find another figurehead for their struggle against political and civil injustice, after Abiola died Tuesday from what was apparently a heart attack.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nigerians voted Saturday in landmark parliamentary elections, marking the latest step in their country's transition to civilian rule and greater democracy. An estimated 40 million voters in this West African nation were given their first chance in 15 years to select civilians for a two-chamber National Assembly. However, there was little fanfare here in Nigeria's commercial capital and second city.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Nigerians continued waiting for their new military government to announce its plans for a transition to civilian rule, members of the country's political opposition insisted Sunday that the fervor of their struggle for democracy has not been stifled after the death of popular politician Moshood Abiola.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An upsurge of trouble in Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta has been testing the new military rulers' tolerance of dissent, forcing them to deal with the aspirations of impoverished ethnic groups and further endangering an already weak economy. In the recent history of the world's sixth-largest oil producer, competing demands for the wealth generated by black gold often have made it seem more of curse than a blessing.
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