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Night Court

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Reinhold Weege, who created the popular Emmy-winning sitcom "Night Court" about an often-anarchic, after-hours New York courtroom and its cast of memorably loony characters, has died. He was 62. Weege, who also wrote and co-produced the television series "Barney Miller," died Dec. 1 of natural causes at his home in La Jolla, said Bonnie Covelli, his former assistant. "Night Court," which aired on NBC from 1984 to 1992, starred a boyish Harry Anderson as the unorthodox, fun-loving judge Harry Stone and John Larroquette as lecherous prosecuting attorney Dan Fielding.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Reinhold Weege, who created the popular Emmy-winning sitcom "Night Court" about an often-anarchic, after-hours New York courtroom and its cast of memorably loony characters, has died. He was 62. Weege, who also wrote and co-produced the television series "Barney Miller," died Dec. 1 of natural causes at his home in La Jolla, said Bonnie Covelli, his former assistant. "Night Court," which aired on NBC from 1984 to 1992, starred a boyish Harry Anderson as the unorthodox, fun-loving judge Harry Stone and John Larroquette as lecherous prosecuting attorney Dan Fielding.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1987
The presiding judge of the Los Angeles Municipal Court announced Tuesday that its night court program will be expanded from one to three courtrooms in the downtown Criminal Courts Building to handle a 26% increase in felony filings. "Our challenge has been how to handle more work without adding new facilities," Presiding Judge George Trammell said.
OPINION
December 28, 2008
Re "Trials halted to save money," Dec. 22 I am a lawyer, and I teach full time. I am also a judge pro tem, or temporary judge, in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Pro tems work for free. Courts could process cases by utilizing pro tems more effectively in night court and late-afternoon court. Court bailiffs are cops, and there is no extra charge in assigning them to court. Court reporters and court clerks also could be assigned to night court. Lots of people like myself love the law and love court.
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Despite an agreement by Los Angeles Superior Court judges to continue a year-old night-court experiment, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner predicted Tuesday that the judges will work to "sabotage" the program. Reiner, addressing the Board of Supervisors, said that despite Monday's vote of the Superior Court executive committee, "the judges want (night court) to fail" because they do not want to work at night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991
Los Angeles County's 5-year-old night court will shut down Dec. 1, despite criticism from prosecutors and defense attorneys, Presiding Judge Ricardo Torres has announced. In a prepared statement, Torres said the Los Angeles Superior Court Executive Committee considered a request from the Board of Supervisors to delay closing the night court program because of the widespread support it has garnered. In a letter to Torres, Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors asked the Superior Court Tuesday to delay the scheduled shutdown of its popular night court experiment, pending further consideration of whether the move is warranted. But the motion, passed on a vote of 3 to 2, is not expected to have any effect on the Superior Court, which sets its own policies. After the hourlong board hearing, Superior Court Presiding Judge Ricardo A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors asked the Superior Court Tuesday to delay the scheduled shutdown of its popular night court experiment pending further consideration of whether the move is warranted. But the motion, passed on a vote of 3-2, is not expected to have any effect on the Superior Court, which sets its own policies. After the hourlong board hearing, Superior Court Presiding Judge Ricardo A.
NEWS
May 13, 1985 | From Associated Press
Selma Diamond, a chain-smoking actress who played a court matron in NBC's "Night Court" and was one of the few women comedy writers during television's "Golden Age," died today of lung cancer. She was 64. Miss Diamond was pronounced dead at 3:24 a.m., said Ron Wise, a spokesman for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she was admitted May 1. She played the raspy-voiced, what's-it-to-you character Selma Hacker on "Night Court," scheduled to enter its third season this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987
The presiding judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court has said he will appoint a task force to study the idea of holding night court sessions in the civil and family law courts. Although some judges have opposed night sessions in the criminal courts, Judge Jack M. Goertzen said civil and family law cases may provide fewer "logistical problems" with prisoner delivery and jury service and still help relieve daytime court congestion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
Barry S. Michaelson wishes his problems more closely resembled those of his television counterpart, "Night Court" Judge Harry T. Stone, whose main challenges stemmed from the antics of his lothario prosecutor. Michaelson is a commissioner who presides over the traffic portion of Orange County's evening program, which has a more serious plight: Night court has been slashed from weekly to monthly.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | Steven Barrie-Anthony, Times Staff Writer
ANY Saturday night in Hollywood. Outside of "it" clubs like White Lotus, Deep and Ivar, sidewalks teem with various versions of sexy, hip and trendy, everybody looking for validation and a place to party. Seeking admission into the netherworlds of nightlife -- where darkness softens frown lines, music blares louder than nagging introspection and booze eases inhibitions. Lonely in a city full of strangers, here you can finally connect. If you're on the guest list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2002 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Many of this border city's police officers have a notorious history of teaming up with drug dealers, accepting bribes and intimidating tourists. City leaders have tried to combat corruption in the past by firing officers and raising salaries. In their latest attempt to rein in overzealous and crooked law enforcement, city officials have moved to separate the police and judicial departments.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of the first season of A&E's gritty legal series "100 Centre Street," executive producer Sidney Lumet went to star Alan Arkin to see if the actor had any story line suggestions for his character--the even-tempered Manhattan night court judge, Joe Rifkin. "I did it for a specific reason," explains Lumet, the veteran director of such classic feature films as "12 Angry Men," "Network" and "Dog Day Afternoon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2000 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, a 15-year-old North Hollywood girl woke up in the middle of the night to find her father and younger brother dead, each shot in the head as she slept in the next room. Police arrested Kenneth Crandell, a house guest who was eventually found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to death. But Crandell's conviction was later overturned, and he maintains his innocence.
NEWS
September 5, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a mercifully cool tropical night, toddlers, expectant mothers and white-haired seniors squeeze onto six lime-green benches, waiting as two secretaries type out complaints. Many giggle nervously at each burst of profanity issuing forth from behind the door to the detention area a few feet away. On the other side of the door, half a dozen men are crowded into the single holding cell. Outside the cell, handcuffed to its bars, a naked, middle-aged woman shouts obscenities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1987 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from the county Board of Supervisors, the executive committee of the Los Angeles Superior Court reversed itself Monday and agreed to allow the highly regarded night court experiment to continue for up to two years. But Presiding Judge Jack E. Goertzen made it clear that the judges remain opposed to night court, and still believe that statistics used to demonstrate the success of the experiment have been erroneously interpreted.
NEWS
July 16, 1986 | EDWARD J. BOYER, Times Staff Writer
Florence Halop, who parlayed a one-shot appearance as the cantankerous Mrs. Hufnagle on "St. Elsewhere" into 23 and succeeded the late Selma Diamond as the bailiff on NBC's "Night Court" last year, died of cancer Tuesday. The 63-year-old actress had entered Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on June 19 after suffering a stroke. It was then that doctors discovered her advanced cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1995 | Craig Tomashoff, Craig Tomashoff is a staff correspondent in the Los Angeles bureau of People magazine. and
Thursday nights on NBC are a lot like automatic teller machines. Both have been created within our lifetime, but it's nearly impossible to remember a time when they didn't exist. There was an era when getting cash meant standing in a long line at the teller window and NBC Thursday nights meant "Lewis & Clark" and "Harper Valley PTA." Somewhere along the line, though, cash became available on every street corner and watching NBC's Thursday shows became almost like a job requirement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1995 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilman Nate Holden took the witness stand in civil court Monday and testified that he never sexually harassed a receptionist who is suing him, nor anyone else, but he acknowledged that the former staffer once visited his apartment after midnight to give him a massage. Superior Court Judge Raymond D.
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