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April 30, 2004 | Chris Pasles
Jeremy Irons and Juliet Stevenson have withdrawn from the Los Angeles Opera presentation of "A Little Night Music" scheduled for July 7 to July 31 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. According to the company, scheduling conflicts prevented the two from reprising the roles they took when this production of Stephen Sondheim's 1973 musical originated at the New York City Opera last summer. Broadway veterans Victor Garber and Judith Ivey will replace them as Fredrik and Desiree, respectively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Despite Ryan Seacrest spending hours on the red carpet talking couture lifestyle with platinum-selling music stars, it was the artists who celebrated second-hand culture who busted through the pomp to win many of the 56th Grammy Awards' most coveted trophies. In fact, at times the ceremony Sunday at Los Angeles' Staples Center felt like a night for the underdogs - at least as much as anyone standing before millions of viewers on music's biggest stage can be considered such. A young woman from New Zealand, Lorde, who this time last year was gigging at small clubs, arrived in a no-name sleeveless tee to celebrate diamondless lives in "Royals.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1992
"The Phantom of the Opera" is not only a pleasure for adults to experience, but also for kids! ("The Phantom Phenomenon," by Barbara Isenberg, May 31). The fifth grade from St. John of the Cross School in Lemon Grove went to see the play. We loved it so much we want to see it again. Our class got so excited we didn't want to leave the theater. Children can love opera-style music as much as adults! Not only do we love the fascinating Phantom, but we still enjoy music like rap and rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's monthlong 10th-anniversary celebration of the opening of Walt Disney Concert Hall entered Phase 2 on Friday night. Esa-Pekka Salonen was back. And it was old-home week. The former music director's old Finnish friends were on hand for the premiere of Magnus Lindberg's Cello Concerto No. 2, written for soloist Anssi Karttunen. There were other old friends as well - Debussy and Bartók. Both composers were mainstays of Salonen's 17 years leading the L.A. Phil.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2005 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Vermont's Marlboro Music School and Festival sent another batch of alumni to UCLA's Schoenberg Hall on Saturday night, where again they lighted up the room with their energy and controlled abandon. There must be a primal force within the idyllic Marlboro setting -- with its winding country lanes and whimsical "Caution: Musicians at Play" road sign -- that keeps them charged up from summer to early spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By David Rooney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It seems like the brainchild of a marketing genius. Take two of Broadway's most celebrated living actresses, bringing with them more than 100 years of combined New York stage experience, and cast them as mother and daughter in a show that mines both their glittering history as musical-theater performers and their indelible association with the composer. It was some casting coup to have Bernadette Peters and Elaine Stritch step into the Broadway revival of "A Little Night Music," particularly for a production that had been scheduled to close when original leads Catherine Zeta-Jones and Angela Lansbury finished their contracts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A midlife crisis is rather an unsettling thing--but a hilarious one nonetheless when it befalls the reunited ex-lovers at the heart of Interact Theatre Company's spirited revival of "A Little Night Music." Stephen Sondheim's luminous songs and Hugh Wheeler's book are rarely graced with the caliber of talent assembled under John Rubinstein's ambitious staging of this notoriously difficult piece, a musical adaptation of the Ingmar Bergman film comedy "Smiles of a Summer Night."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Far from the madding Oscars--well, only a few miles from the Shrine but a universe away from "Shine"--the Leo S. Bing Theater of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art paid an inspiring tribute to musical well-being Monday night. Terry Riley, the legendary keyboard player and composer from Northern California, made a much too rare local appearance, at the Monday Evening Concerts, where he was joined by the remarkable Italian bassist Stefano Scodanibbio.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
A superstar returned to Hollywood Bowl on Thursday, and attracted a happy audience officially tabulated at 14,741. The huge crowd wasn't drawn by any matinee idol on the podium. The guest-conductor was Peter Maag, an under-rated old pro from Switzerland who had appeared here only once before--two nights earlier. The magnet wasn't any big-name instrumentalist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Peter Maag, the eminent Swiss maestro who recently celebrated his 76th birthday, "is renowned chiefly as a Mozart conductor". Thus speaks the equally eminent "Grove Dictionary". The management of the Los Angeles Philharmonic is trying to underscore the point this week in the vast--probably far too vast--open spaces of the Hollywood Bowl. Twice.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011
MUSIC Local avant-garde rock trio Autolux provides the soundtrack to "Into the Night: Music and Magic," which includes performances from Superhumanoids and KCRW-FM DJ Anthony Valadez. The evening's entertainment features strolling magicians, a screening of the Harry Houdini serial "Master Mystery" (1920) and access to the galleries. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fri. $15. (310) 440-4500. http://www.skirball.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By David Rooney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It seems like the brainchild of a marketing genius. Take two of Broadway's most celebrated living actresses, bringing with them more than 100 years of combined New York stage experience, and cast them as mother and daughter in a show that mines both their glittering history as musical-theater performers and their indelible association with the composer. It was some casting coup to have Bernadette Peters and Elaine Stritch step into the Broadway revival of "A Little Night Music," particularly for a production that had been scheduled to close when original leads Catherine Zeta-Jones and Angela Lansbury finished their contracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
Dancers spin across a stage in flowing silk tunics under a bridge evoking Vietnam's imperial city. Quang Le, a popular young Vietnamese singer, serenades the audience with a song about falling in love. Suddenly, there's an explosion and the bridge collapses. A crying baby is heard as the dancers fall to the floor. Quang Le slowly rises, tears streaming down his face as he sings a new song, this one about the loss of innocence. The camera cuts to a montage of teary-eyed Vietnamese in the 3,000-member audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2010 | Reed Johnson and Josh Getlin
Reporting from New York The feel-good musical "Memphis" and the art world drama "Red" were among the biggest Tony Award winners on a night when both Hollywood and London cast long shadows over Broadway's 64th annual spring ritual. "Red," a two-character play starring Alfred Molina as mercurial Abstract Expressionist painter Mark Rothko, won for best new play, one of six statuettes the show claimed at Sunday evening's ceremony. It was produced by London's acclaimed nonprofit Donmar Warehouse before opening this spring on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Awards should be aspirational, validating excellence and originality even though each and every one of us knows that commercialism rules the day. But far be it from the ever-insecure Tonys — the geeky glee club representative of the major entertainment awards — to bite the hand that feeds it. For the third year in a row the best musical award went not to the work that deserved it but to the one with the greatest box-office potential on...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The recent parade of Hollywood stars on Broadway has allowed theater critics to indulge in their two favorite pastimes — grousing and fawning. The hypocrisy is perfectly natural: Standards need to be upheld while luminaries are there to be adored. Yet pity the poor conflicted reviewer — committed to "The Theatuh" on the one hand, swept up in the tidal surge of celebrity charisma on the other. I've always maintained that a good actor is a good actor. But famous novices and returning legends need to choose their theatrical ventures wisely.
FOOD
July 12, 2006 | Susan LaTempa and Donna Deane, Times Staff Writers
ANY meal can be the ideal Hollywood Bowl meal. It's just that some suppers are more ideal for certain evenings than others. A tuna sandwich and a beer work for a night when you've made a last-minute decision to grab some cheap seats up in the bleachers. A box dinner from your favorite restaurant is a convenient choice when you've made a park-and-ride bus reservation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2010
Charlie Sheen gets to remain a free man for at least another month. A plea bargain under which the actor was expected to be sentenced to 30 days in an Aspen, Colo., jail for assaulting his wife hit a snag Monday, and the court hearing was postponed until July 12. Sheen, 44, the star of the CBS comedy "Two and a Half Men," had been expected to plead guilty to a reduced charge of misdemeanor assault, and to be sentenced to 30 days in jail. The reported deal would have allowed him to leave jail to coach actors at a local theater during the day, and he could have been freed after 17 days with credit for good behavior, according to legal sources.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010 | By Mark Sachs, Los Angeles Times
Gary Sinise is probably best known for his long-running role as Det. Mac Taylor on CBS' "CSI: NY" and his Oscar-nominated performance as Lt. Dan in "Forrest Gump," but the Valley resident will show his true colors — as in red, white and blue — on Sunday night, co-hosting "The National Memorial Day Concert" on PBS. "It's a magnificent show that they hold right in front of the Capitol building," says Sinise. "I did this for the first time back in 2005. I was in Germany at the time on a USO tour with my band, the Lt. Dan Band (ltdanband.
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