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NATIONAL
June 21, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The jury weighing sex-abuse charges against former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky adjourned for the night late Thursday and will resume deliberations in the morning, when members will rehear testimony about what allegedly happened in the shower at the school's football training facility. More than seven hours after jurors began deliberations, they asked to rehear testimony from Mike McQueary, a former graduate assistant at the school who said he saw Sandusky abusing a boy in the shower, and from the friend he talked to that night, Dr. Jonathan Dranov.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010
Nothing can beat the experience of a sleepover with some new friends when you're a kid. The Discovery Center is hosting these nights of weird science that begin at 7 p.m. and include Virtual Volleyball and hands-on interaction with more than 100 exhibits. 2500 N. Main St., Santa Ana. 6:45 p.m. Friday. $35 for children, $25 for adults. www.discoverycube.org.
SPORTS
May 29, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin
Reporting from Denver -- This was just one of those nights. You could tell right away. With his third pitch, Hiroki Kuroda hit a batter. The catcher threw the ball back to Kuroda, who missed it. It was that kind of evening for the Dodgers, best forgotten. The Colorado Rockies thumped them, 11-3, on a blustery night that evoked memories of San Francisco's Candlestick Park. "This was a game we just chalk up and say, 'See you tomorrow,'" Dodgers Manager Joe Torre said.
WORLD
January 25, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
The ritual began just as the soft winter sun ducked behind the mountains Sunday, casting haunting shadows on this jittery Caribbean capital. Blackened pots bubbled with suppers of rice and beans above glowing charcoal. Sheets, cardboard mats and mattresses were laid neatly on the streets; a lucky few pitched pup tents. Chunks of rubble blocked roads to protect alfresco sleepers from passing motorists. The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti nearly two weeks ago, and dozens of aftershocks, including a 5.9 temblor at dawn last week, has turned Port-au-Prince into a city deathly afraid of the indoors.
SPORTS
April 9, 2010 | By Dylan Hernandez
Hiroki Kuroda said his deceased friend was in his thoughts. Two days before Kuroda held the Florida Marlins to an unearned run over eight magnificent innings in the Dodgers' 7-3 victory at Sun Life Stadium, he learned from news reports out of Japan that Takuya Kimura had died of a brain hemorrhage. But as Kuroda stood in front of his locker biting his lower lip between sentences on Friday night, he said he didn't want to trivialize the death of his longtime Hiroshima Carp teammate by doing something as tacky as dedicating his first victory of the season to him. "To say that I pitched for Takuya-san and that it affected the outcome of the game would be making light of what happened," Kuroda said.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Painesville ordered a Salvation Army worker who stole a holiday kettle containing about $250 to spend a night homeless. Nathen Smith, 28, was to spend the night anywhere but a house, said Municipal Judge Michael Cicconetti. Smith was fitted with a GPS device to track his location.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994
Is there something I'm missing? We moved from New York over 14 years ago. The question I am most frequently asked is what do I miss most back East. The answer is very simple. It is not hot pastrami sandwiches, nor even Broadway shows. It's the warm, nice and warm, summer evenings when we could go for a walk in shirt sleeves or just sit out on the patio, talking and enjoying the night air. Or we could go to a ballgame. Which brings me back to what I'm missing. That is, why somebody hasn't mentioned with respect to the proposed baseball stadium in Ventura County for a minor league team that people in their right minds are not going to pay money to sit in a stand while the weather gets chillier and chillier until they are downright uncomfortable.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | AL MARTINEZ
It was one of those misty Santa Monica nights that remind me of San Francisco, when fog wets the streets and mutes the ordinary sounds of traffic. People were walking around with their collars turned up and even a loud laugh sounded intrusive. Voices ought to be low when the fog rolls in. I had just come from a performance of something called "Tomfoolery" at the Burbage Theater in West L.A., which I thought might make a column for me, but it didn't. I was naturally depressed.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Jonathan Gold
It is late at night, and you're heading home to the Westside, and you pass the small phalanx of trucks that park on the north side of Third Street near Normandie, almost the last scraps of taco culture before you reach the blander precincts of Hancock Park. And perhaps you're attracted by the La Tehuana truck, whose blinking crawl advertises not just carnitas but the broad Oaxacan-style tostadas called tlayudas , which often come smeared with a paste made with equal parts of pureed black beans and freshly rendered lard.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
In San Diego circa 1972, the Wild Animal Park made its debut, the Rolling Stones played a concert in the city as part of their North American tour and the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina opened for business. The hotel marks its 40th year by offering second-night stays for $72 through the end of the year. The deal: Book a room at the best available rate and pay $72 for a second night. The deal requires a two-night minimum stay, of course, and the discount is applied when you check in. (You'll see the full price for two nights if you book online.)
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