Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNightclubs Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Nightclubs Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1998 | PATRICK KERKSTRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On any given evening at the Duet restaurant and nightclub in Westwood Village, patrons are inspired by the live salsa music or the sounds of a deejay's rhythm and blues records to get up and form an impromptu dance floor next to the stage. But the dancing doesn't last long. "We have to interrupt them and ask them to stop," said Duet co-owner Chris Mallick. "It can get very awkward and embarrassing." Mallick has little choice if he wants to avoid citations and possibly even jail time.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994
The 5-4 Ballroom and Supper Club, a historic jazz club considered by some to be the Apollo Theater of South-Central Los Angeles, reopened Friday. The club, a cultural landmark that originally featured big bands, was built in 1922. The club had been idle for 25 years until Oliver W. Wilson, a professor in the department of political science at Cal State Dominguez Hills, bought it in 1980 and began the restoration project.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A sad clubland truth: Hollywood's breed of club-goer takes its nightspots for granted. Scenesters sniff at the notion of waiting in line. And they sniff even more if there isn't a line. And though a space such as Club Lingerie was once the heart of the underground music scene, it can close its neon-lighted doors without a tear shed by those who called it home. In this trend-eat-trend world, it's a wonder there are any survivors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2001 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
Looking for a piece of clubland action? Here are some new adventures sure to whet your wah-wah whistle, with key nights noted: * Beauty Bar (1638 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood, [323] 464-7676). Fun nightly, with rock 'n' roll deejays. 21 and older. No cover. * Blue (1642 Las Palmas Ave., Hollywood, [323] 268-7828 or [323] 462-7442) Hot new Friday, hosted by Bolthouse Productions. * Burgundy Room (1621 Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood, [323] 465-7530).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court order forbidding nude dancing and strip-tease entertainment at the Extasy club in Northridge was upheld Thursday when the California Supreme Court refused to review an appeal by the club owners. The state Supreme Court's decision ends a legal showdown between the city and Extasy's operators over municipal zoning, begun by Councilman Hal Bernson when the club opened in January in a former restaurant at Corbin Avenue and Nordhoff Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, Chuck Crisafulli is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer
The extent of the comedy club slump became clear last year when New York's landmark Catch a Rising Star club closed its doors. There was a time when Catch and the New York Improv were the twin citadels of happening, urban comedy, with Rodney Dangerfield and Robert Klein yukking it up at the Improv and David Brenner and Richard Belzer working the laughs at Catch. Jerry Seinfeld got his start at Catch, and made a point of being there on an emotional closing night. The N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1993 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many a blue moon, sorcerers have gathered nightly in a tall Victorian home overlooking Hollywood to ply the occult arts. Beyond a secret passageway, in elegant rooms of brass and dark wood, their stage acts have made the Magic Castle one of the most venerable--and otherworldly--of Los Angeles' private clubs. But managers of the famed nightspot are finding that in bleak economic times it takes more than mere wizardry to keep a castle afloat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1995 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda, Heidi Siegmund Cuda is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Burn baby burn! Disco inferno. Burn baby burn! Burn that mother down. --From the Trammps' 1977 hit "Disco Inferno" Heidi Siegmund Cuda At Saturday Night Fever, the weekly gala at the Diamond Club on Hollywood Boulevard, the boogieing never stops. Dancing queens in the capacity throng come dolled up in satin, platforms and the occasional glittering afro wig. No matter that it's L.A. '95, and the neo-disco wave is soooo five minutes ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a popular Northridge nightclub, dancers won't be waltzing in ballroom attire or square-dancing in cowboy hats and gingham skirts any longer--in fact, they won't be wearing anything at all. Formerly the Breakers Seafood Restaurant and Nightclub, the club has been renamed Extasy and the new owners plan to offer a different type of entertainment. "It will be a completely nude adult cabaret," said Steve Gamer, club spokesman. Some residents and local officials are not pleased with the change.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|