Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNightmare Scenario
IN THE NEWS

Nightmare Scenario

NEWS
June 21, 2000
It was Phil Jackson's nightmare scenario. Things were normal for a half. Then . . . everything . . . about . . . the Laker offense . . . slowed down . . . then . . . stopped. Cold. It was one devastating third quarter, on the way to a potentially series-altering 106-77 Trail Blazer victory in Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, which evened the series, 1-1.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Members of the California Legislative Black Caucus are calling for a boycott of Florida in response to the acquittal of George Zimmerman on murder charges in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in that state. Assemblywoman Holly J. Mitchell (D-Los Angeles), chairwoman of the caucus, also called for peaceful protests over the verdict in the killing of the African American teenager. "We can send the Sunshine State a message by refusing to patronize Florida,” Mitchell said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2012 | By Robert Abele
A movie contemptuous of advertising, the choppy, formless dystopian-sci-fi doodad "Branded" wasn't screened for critics and was barely hyped before release last Friday, which means some marketing choices aren't that unwise. Misha (a charmless Ed Stoppard) is a Moscow-based ad executive and sometime spy who falls for the boss' American niece (Leelee Sobieski), a go-getter producing a makeover reality show that backfires when its plus-size star goes into a coma, ushering in a worldwide big-is-beautiful movement, which is really a global conspiracy cooked up on a Polynesian island by a fast-food corporate cabal and a marketing guru (Max von Sydow)
BUSINESS
February 23, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Nicole Gaouette and Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writers
An Arab company's bid to take over management of cargo terminals at half a dozen U.S. ports has become a rallying point for critics seeking tougher port security and greater scrutiny of foreign investment. But trade and security experts said criticism of the deal involving government-owned Dubai Ports World was misguided because the U.S. government, not terminal operators, was responsible for security at the ports. In addition, they said, foreign companies already control a large share of the U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Plans to sell groundwater from beneath the Mojave Desert to Southern California suburbs are likely to pick up another approval Monday when Cadiz Inc.'s proposal goes before the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors. But the company's highest hurdles lie ahead. The project faces mounting legal challenges, difficult negotiations with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California over use of the Colorado River Aqueduct, opposition from California's senior U.S. senator and the possibility that it may yet be forced to undergo an exhaustive review under federal environmental law. "I think the biggest obstacle Cadiz is going to have is sitting in Washington, D.C., named Dianne Feinstein," water district board member Brett Barbre said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990 | Douglas Jehl, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of the joint U.S. force in Operation Desert Shield, was interviewed Wednesday in Saudi Arabia by Times staff writer Douglas Jehl. The following is excerpted from Schwarzkopf's comments:
Question: You have been quoted as saying that "war is a profanity," and in this crisis you have criticized others for their impatience. But in your career you have also been an advocate, when war comes, of bringing overwhelming force to bear against your adversary. Can you reconcile these views? Answer: I don't think they're contradictory at all. As you know, I've been involved in two wars--two tours of Vietnam and then the Grenada thing. I have very vivid memories of the men under my command.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1995
A historic library hundreds of miles from here stands as the nightmare scenario for Northridge earthquake recovery. The library is at Stanford University. Part of it was badly damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Stanford officials finally reached an agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency on rebuilding costs in 1994. The library is not expected to reopen before 1997. It was not that difficult to imagine such a scenario here.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. military mission to protect Kurds in northern Iraq nears an end, Kurdish leaders claimed Tuesday that the withdrawal may force them to sign a one-sided agreement with Saddam Hussein that will help extend his control throughout Iraq and entrench his dictatorship.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
The lives of up to 5 million Ethiopians are at risk because anti-government forces have shut down a port that has been the key entry point for outside food assistance, U.S. officials say. Further aggravating the situation has been the prospect of severely diminished harvests throughout northern Ethiopia as a result of poor rainfall. To the west, U.S.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years after he stepped down as chief executive of Autodesk Inc. in favor of working as a programmer, John Walker, the brilliant, iconoclastic co-founder of the Sausalito-based software firm, is temporarily resuming a management role in the company. Walker, who wrote an eloquent 44-page memo to Autodesk employees last spring that criticized the company as "stuck in the past," and "paralyzed by unwarranted caution," will assume the post of manager of technology for "at least the next 90 days."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|