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Nightmare

ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Ten months into the moviegoing year, and many of the most lucrative surprises at the box office are cut of the horror cloth: “The Conjuring” ($137 million), “Insidious Chapter 2” ($81 million), “Mama” ($71 million). Conceived with low expectations and lower budgets, all three coasted to weekend wins and have ended up in the box office top 50. You could imagine, then, how it was easy to think "Carrie" could continue the trend last weekend -- A-list cast, big marketing spend and the added selling point that the film shares name and concept with one of the most popular horror movies of all time.
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NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Boa constrictor snakes, black widowspiders, guillotine decapitations, electrifying electrocutions, sadistic insane asylums. Welcome toAlice Cooper's walk-through nightmare. The "Alice Cooper: Welcome to my Nightmare" maze at Halloween Horror Nights 2011 turns the shock-rocker's songs, characters and theatrical concerts into a walk-through haunted attraction. I took a tour of the Alice Cooper maze this week in the Jurassic Park ride queue at Universal Studios Hollywood with Horror Nights creative director John Murdy.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
Re "Computers Push the Limits of Artificial Intelligence" (April 24): We are well into the industrial era. What we have to show for it is a huge percentage of our population that is "redundant" and sitting idle in large ghettos. Most of us are working harder and harder to make ends meet. The promise of industrialism has turned into a nightmare of social disruption and pollution. What on Earth is a smart robot going to do, if it is so smart, besides shut itself down as a favor to mankind.
NEWS
October 6, 1985
The recent article about Beyond War was inspiring and hopeful. Clearly the organization offers a way out of our present-day nuclear nightmare. By starting with ourselves and changing the way we think, we can learn to resolve any conflict. The simple idea, that we are one, is not new, but it is imperative that we learn it once and for all. Perhaps the Beyond War package will succeed where others have failed. I think it's our only hope. CHERI WOLPERT Thousand Oaks
SPORTS
October 11, 1986
Thank God, the nightmare of Chavez Ravine is finally over. Deep and drastic therapy is needed so that 1987 doesn't turn out to be just a dreary replay of '86. Al Campanis must retire! Far too much faith in the wrong young players and in aging players looking to wind up their careers in Southern California. Brock? Sorry, kid, four full seasons is enough. Maybe there will be less pressure in Seattle. Reuss, Cabell, Madlock and Landreaux? A new world of radio and TV announcing is calling.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2000
Greg Braxton's article on the anemic show-biz curb appeal of the "Big Brother" cast (yes, cast) as contrasted with the "Survivor" cast was on the mark (" 'Big Brother' Cast Is Meeting Big Yawns," Oct. 14). But, like other commentators, Braxton missed a major reason. Yes, "Big Brother" was boring. But the reason why is more complicated than a lack of chemistry or conflict between cast members. The bare fact was that, except for Cassandra, most members were intellectually vapid "me-heads" who had nothing to say about themselves or others that revealed enough brain wattage to light up a thimble.
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