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Nikolai Ogorodnikova

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NEWS
May 4, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nikolai Ogorodnikov is a man without a country, and that suits him just fine. But it is creating a legal dilemma for the United States, which is unable to ship the convicted Soviet spy back home because his country no longer exists. Adding to the predicament, Ogorodnikov is risking a second criminal prosecution in the United States for refusing to ask any other country to accept him. A 1952 law says he must cooperate in his own deportation or face 10 years in prison.
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NEWS
May 4, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nikolai Ogorodnikov is a man without a country, and that suits him just fine. But it is creating a legal dilemma for the United States, which is unable to ship the convicted Soviet spy back home because his country no longer exists. Adding to the predicament, Ogorodnikov is risking a second criminal prosecution in the United States for refusing to ask any other country to accept him. A 1952 law says he must cooperate in his own deportation or face 10 years in prison.
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NEWS
November 23, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for Richard W. Miller, the former FBI agent accused of selling secrets to the Soviet KGB during an adulterous affair with a Soviet emigre, said they will ask a judge to block attempts to deport the woman and her husband. Both Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai Ogorodnikov, are serving prison terms after pleading guilty to espionage charges, but the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has said that the husband could be released and face deportation as early as Jan. 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He scrounges for a living, making it on $97 a month worth of food stamps and some welfare cash for other living expenses. His beat-up 15-year-old Toyota, bought at a bargain basement price of $300, needed mechanical work that cost more than the car. He lives in a frayed, one-bedroom apartment in West Hollywood, where he pays $306 a month rent. His new job, driving a passenger van for a hotel, pays $5.50 an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He scrounges for a living, making it on $97 a month worth of food stamps and some welfare cash for other living expenses. His beat-up 15-year-old Toyota, bought at a bargain basement price of $300, needed mechanical work that cost more than the car. He lives in a frayed, one-bedroom apartment in West Hollywood, where he pays $306 a month rent. His new job, driving a passenger van for a hotel, pays $5.50 an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday barred government efforts to deport two convicted Soviet spys, clearing the way for them to testify in the upcoming retrial of Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi ruled that Miller has a right to call Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai, as witnesses in his third trial in April, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once asked to describe his former lover, ex-FBI agent and convicted spy Richard W. Miller replied that Svetlana Ogorodnikova was "charming, outgoing, vivacious" and that she spoke atrocious English. After 11 years in prison on espionage charges, Ogorodnikova still speaks fractured English. But the charm and vivacity are in little evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A year ago this week an FBI agent named Graham Van Note arrived in Los Angeles from Washington to help supervise an espionage investigation known as Whipworm. Van Note had chosen the name himself sometime earlier while thumbing through a dictionary at FBI headquarters. His first choice was Whippet, but that had already been selected for something else. Whipworm was on the same page of Van Note's dictionary, and the definition seemed appropriate for the case at hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A federal prosecutor suggested Monday that former FBI agent Richard W. Miller told his boss about his involvement with accused Soviet spy Svetlana Ogorodnikova Sept. 27 only because he had learned from her the previous day that she was under FBI surveillance. Miller, smiling nervously as he finished five days of tough questioning from Assistant U.S. Atty. Bruce G. Merritt, said he did not remember being told by Ogorodnikova Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday barred government efforts to deport two convicted Soviet spys, clearing the way for them to testify in the upcoming retrial of Richard Miller, the only FBI agent ever charged with espionage. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi ruled that Miller has a right to call Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai, as witnesses in his third trial in April, 1990.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for Richard W. Miller, the former FBI agent accused of selling secrets to the Soviet KGB during an adulterous affair with a Soviet emigre, said they will ask a judge to block attempts to deport the woman and her husband. Both Svetlana Ogorodnikova and her husband, Nikolai Ogorodnikov, are serving prison terms after pleading guilty to espionage charges, but the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has said that the husband could be released and face deportation as early as Jan. 4.
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