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Nile River

April 8, 1999
Earthquakes The worst temblor to strike northern India this century killed more than 110 people and leveled villages in the lower reaches of the Himalayan Mountains. The initial quake was followed by numerous powerful aftershocks, and also unleashed landslides that tore through some remote communities. Earth movements were also felt along the Tajikistan-Afghanistan border, and in southwest Iran, Japans Izu Peninsula, northwest Greece, northern Venezuela and southern coastal Chile.
September 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Fire broke out in an Egyptian theater during a crowded play performance late Monday, causing audience members to flee in panic, officials said. At least 29 people were killed, some from the flames and some in the stampede. The fire erupted about 11:45 p.m. in a theater in Beni Suef, a city on the Nile River about 70 miles south of Cairo, a police official said. "It was like being inside a barbecue grill.
August 12, 1992 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
These are the "dog days" of summer. Hot, still, lazy days in which the summer sun seems especially intense. Of course, nowadays, we attribute the heat to the fact that our hemisphere at this time of year receives more direct rays from the sun. In ancient times, though, the dog days were associated with a star called Sirius in the constellation Canis Major, the Greater Dog. Paradoxically, this star is primarily known for its appearance in the winter sky.
August 30, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Magellan spacecraft has discovered a geological groove on the surface of Venus that is longer than the Nile River, NASA reported Thursday. Scientists at the space agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena said they do not know what formed the channel, which measures about 1 mile across and runs for about 4,200 miles in a winding, smoothly curved course. "The very existence of such a long channel is a great puzzle.
September 2, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Egypt remains in flux since the revolution exploded in January. Tourism has been slow to bounce back, according to media reports. Upscale outfitter Abercrombie & Kent has put together a new 11-day trip to ancient landmarks beginning at  $1,995 a person. The deal: Egypt: A Moment in History is about the lowest price I've ever seen for A&K's usual Egypt itineraries (you can view a cost comparison on the website), but it doesn't scrimp on the highlights. The itinerary includes visits to the pyramids, the Sphinx, the Temple at Karnak and other ancient sites.
After Mohamed el Amir Atta disappeared from the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in 1997, he turned up here on an island in the middle of the Elbe River, at a red-brick prewar housing project on a broad, bleak street that faces a ribbon-wire fence and the Hamburg harbor, gray and forbidding, beyond. Wilhelmsburg is industrial, worn-out, so psychologically remote that it is sometimes called the Forgotten Island. It's here but hidden.
September 21, 2010 | Reuters
Moses might not have parted the Red Sea, but a strong east wind that blew through the night could have pushed the waters back in the way described in biblical writings and the Koran, U.S. researchers reported on Tuesday. Computer simulations, part of a larger study on how winds affect water, show wind could push water back at a point where a river bent to merge with a coastal lagoon, the team at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the University of Colorado at Boulder said.
April 29, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
I'll bet you that archaeologist Betsy Bryan's perspective on reality-show behavior is a little longer than most. Since 2001, Bryan has led the excavation of the temple complex of the Egyptian goddess Mut in modern-day Luxor, the site of the city of Thebes in ancient Egypt. And the ritual she has uncovered, which centers on binge drinking, thumping music and orgiastic public sex, probably makes "Jersey Shore" look pretty tame. At least it was thought to serve a greater societal purpose.
July 22, 2006 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
A 3,200-year interlude of tropical rains once transformed the eastern Sahara into a verdant savanna where seminomadic people thrived amid elephants, cattle and more than 30 species of fish, according to German researchers. After collecting more than 500 radiocarbon dates at 150 sites in an area larger than Western Europe, University of Cologne researchers found that the sudden climate change 10,500 years ago coaxed thousands of people to move into the now desolate expanse.
June 1, 2013
Re "Giving a bad name to Chinese tourists," May 29 Just like the Chinese boy who scratched his name on an ancient Egyptian temple wall, people have been leaving graffiti on Egyptian monuments for quite some time now. In the early 6th century BC, some Greek and Carian mercenaries traveling up the Nile River in the service of the Pharaoh Psammetichus II left a long "Kilroy Was Here" memo scratched on one of the legs of the statue of Ramses...
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