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Nina Totenberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life imitates art on TV from time to time, but perhaps never so closely as it does on tonight's "Murphy Brown" episode, in which Candice Bergen's character faces a U.S. Senate committee that is investigating a leaked confidential Senate report. This morning, a real-life broadcast reporter--National Public Radio's Nina Totenberg--was scheduled to face a Senate special counsel who really is investigating a leaked confidential Senate report.
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BOOKS
December 11, 1994
Having Nina Totenberg review the books about Judge Clarence Thomas (Nov. 13) was a gratuitous insult to any of your readers who have seen her on PBS or "Nightline." Next you will probably have Bob Shapiro review the O.J. books. MARK A DOYLE, GLENDALE I write to take exception to Nina Totenberg's characterization of my book, "The Real Anita Hill," as factually flawed. Totenberg failed to note that the sole review of my book, which questioned its accuracy, was written by the two competing reporters whose book was under review by Totenberg.
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BOOKS
December 11, 1994
Having Nina Totenberg review the books about Judge Clarence Thomas (Nov. 13) was a gratuitous insult to any of your readers who have seen her on PBS or "Nightline." Next you will probably have Bob Shapiro review the O.J. books. MARK A DOYLE, GLENDALE I write to take exception to Nina Totenberg's characterization of my book, "The Real Anita Hill," as factually flawed. Totenberg failed to note that the sole review of my book, which questioned its accuracy, was written by the two competing reporters whose book was under review by Totenberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nina Totenberg, the National Public Radio reporter who broke the story of Anita Hill's allegations of sexual harassment against then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, is joining NBC News as a legal-affairs commentator and analyst. But she will continue working for NPR. When she begins appearing on NBC next Monday, Totenberg will be the third NPR reporter to join one of the major TV networks this summer.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
National Public Radio legal affairs reporter Nina Totenberg on Monday joined other journalists in refusing to reveal news sources to a special counsel empowered by the Senate to investigate leaks about its deliberations. None of the half-dozen reporters and editors who have been asked under subpoena to disclose sources have done so, setting the stage for a confrontation over First Amendment rights if the Senate decides to try to compel testimony by the journalists. The special counsel, Peter E.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nina Totenberg, the National Public Radio reporter who broke the story of Anita Hill's allegations of sexual harassment against then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, is joining NBC News as a legal-affairs commentator and analyst. But she will continue working for NPR. When she begins appearing on NBC next Monday, Totenberg will be the third NPR reporter to join one of the major TV networks this summer.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special Senate counsel investigating news leaks on Monday subpoenaed telephone records of the two reporters who broke the story last fall of Anita Faye Hill's allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. The two reporters and their news organizations, Timothy Phelps of Newsday and Nina Totenberg of National Public Radio, argued that the new order violates the First Amendment rights of a free press and is a politically dangerous abuse of senatorial power.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special Senate investigator said Tuesday that he could not determine who secretly told reporters last fall about Anita Faye Hill's sexual harassment allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not much has happened in Washington in the two months since a group of conservative Republican senators--claiming that public television and radio were too liberal--used a procedural ploy to hold up a bill authorizing funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. But locally, a torrent of concern over the action--known in Senate jargon as a "hold"--has been unleashed by Santa Monica public-radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), which has been using the situation as a fund-raising tool.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
Yes, the National Public Radio reporter who blew the whistle on ex-Supreme Court nominee Douglas Ginsburg's pot-smoking took a toke once. "I have never smoked marijuana except for once when I took a puff in my room," said Nina Totenberg, NPR's legal affairs reporter. But, unlike Sens. Albert Gore (D-Tenn.), former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt or any of the rest of the parade of public officials who have confessed to inhaling cannabis in their youth, Totenberg doesn't particularly regret it.
MAGAZINE
May 10, 1992 | MURRAY FROMSON, Murray Fromson is a journalism professor, director of the Center for International Journalism at USC and a veteran broadcaster
Eight men and eight women, all editors and producers, sit around an oblong table in the conference room of National Public Radio's Washington headquarters. It's 10:30 a.m., time for the daily story conference that will decide the lineup of the network's evening news showcase, "All Things Considered," and National Public Radio's other daily news programs. In a word, the atmosphere is minimalist, nothing like the posh surroundings of the commercial networks. Some mauve chairs.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special Senate investigator said Tuesday that he could not determine who secretly told reporters last fall about Anita Faye Hill's sexual harassment allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special Senate counsel investigating news leaks on Monday subpoenaed telephone records of the two reporters who broke the story last fall of Anita Faye Hill's allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. The two reporters and their news organizations, Timothy Phelps of Newsday and Nina Totenberg of National Public Radio, argued that the new order violates the First Amendment rights of a free press and is a politically dangerous abuse of senatorial power.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
National Public Radio legal affairs reporter Nina Totenberg on Monday joined other journalists in refusing to reveal news sources to a special counsel empowered by the Senate to investigate leaks about its deliberations. None of the half-dozen reporters and editors who have been asked under subpoena to disclose sources have done so, setting the stage for a confrontation over First Amendment rights if the Senate decides to try to compel testimony by the journalists. The special counsel, Peter E.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life imitates art on TV from time to time, but perhaps never so closely as it does on tonight's "Murphy Brown" episode, in which Candice Bergen's character faces a U.S. Senate committee that is investigating a leaked confidential Senate report. This morning, a real-life broadcast reporter--National Public Radio's Nina Totenberg--was scheduled to face a Senate special counsel who really is investigating a leaked confidential Senate report.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not much has happened in Washington in the two months since a group of conservative Republican senators--claiming that public television and radio were too liberal--used a procedural ploy to hold up a bill authorizing funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. But locally, a torrent of concern over the action--known in Senate jargon as a "hold"--has been unleashed by Santa Monica public-radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), which has been using the situation as a fund-raising tool.
MAGAZINE
May 10, 1992 | MURRAY FROMSON, Murray Fromson is a journalism professor, director of the Center for International Journalism at USC and a veteran broadcaster
Eight men and eight women, all editors and producers, sit around an oblong table in the conference room of National Public Radio's Washington headquarters. It's 10:30 a.m., time for the daily story conference that will decide the lineup of the network's evening news showcase, "All Things Considered," and National Public Radio's other daily news programs. In a word, the atmosphere is minimalist, nothing like the posh surroundings of the commercial networks. Some mauve chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
One Year Later: Katie Couric will interview Anita Hill during the first half-hour of NBC's "Today" show on Tuesday, a year after Hill's charges of sexual harassment against Clarence Thomas were made public. The rest of the show will focus on the impact of the Thomas hearings. Highlights include an interview with reporter Nina Totenberg, who broke the Hill story, and a segment on how members of the Senate Judiciary Committee feel about the hearings one year later.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
Yes, the National Public Radio reporter who blew the whistle on ex-Supreme Court nominee Douglas Ginsburg's pot-smoking took a toke once. "I have never smoked marijuana except for once when I took a puff in my room," said Nina Totenberg, NPR's legal affairs reporter. But, unlike Sens. Albert Gore (D-Tenn.), former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt or any of the rest of the parade of public officials who have confessed to inhaling cannabis in their youth, Totenberg doesn't particularly regret it.
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