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Nippon Steel Corp

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BUSINESS
March 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nippon Steel To Cut 7,000 Jobs: Nippon Steel Corp. said it would eliminate the jobs over three years, mainly through attrition, as part of a cost-cutting effort to cope with Japan's recession. The restructuring plan also will slash the Tokyo-based company's budget for equipment investment over the next three years to $3.36 billion, down 40% from the allotment for 1991 to 1993. Nippon Steel, Japan's largest steel maker, expects the plan to save about $2.91 billion, over the 1994 to 1996 period.
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BUSINESS
July 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Intel, Japanese Firm to End Pact: Intel Corp. and Nippon Steel Semiconductor Corp. said they will end their flash memory chip manufacturing agreement in 1995. Nippon Steel Semiconductor has been manufacturing flash chips for Intel since 1991. The termination of the agreement between the two companies comes as Intel looks to build flash chips based on more advanced technologies. Flash chips, used primarily in portable devices, retain data even after their power is shut off.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 1987
Nippon Steel Corp., badly hit by falling exports because of the yen's strength, has announced that it is starting to teach Japanese language and business methods to foreigners. Nippon Steel and the Mitsui trading company said they had set up an entity in Tokyo called the International Communication Center and that they expect to teach about 270 students in the first year, starting this month.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nippon Steel To Cut 7,000 Jobs: Nippon Steel Corp. said it would eliminate the jobs over three years, mainly through attrition, as part of a cost-cutting effort to cope with Japan's recession. The restructuring plan also will slash the Tokyo-based company's budget for equipment investment over the next three years to $3.36 billion, down 40% from the allotment for 1991 to 1993. Nippon Steel, Japan's largest steel maker, expects the plan to save about $2.91 billion, over the 1994 to 1996 period.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Intel, Japanese Firm to End Pact: Intel Corp. and Nippon Steel Semiconductor Corp. said they will end their flash memory chip manufacturing agreement in 1995. Nippon Steel Semiconductor has been manufacturing flash chips for Intel since 1991. The termination of the agreement between the two companies comes as Intel looks to build flash chips based on more advanced technologies. Flash chips, used primarily in portable devices, retain data even after their power is shut off.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steel Firms Raise Price: The first steel price increase in nine years will add to Japanese auto makers' difficulties but won't be enough for steel makers to enjoy a rise in profits during the current fiscal year, analysts say. Negotiations between Toyota Motor Corp., Japan's largest auto maker, and Nippon Steel Corp., the world's largest steel maker, ended last week with an agreement to boost prices for thin stainless steel sheets by 4%,according to observers.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CalComp Inc. said Wednesday it has sold a majority interest in its Japanese marketing subsidiary to two major Japanese corporations in order to increase sales of its computer graphics products in that country. William P. Conlin, CalComp president, said in an interview that the sale of 56% of Nippon CalComp to Nippon Steel Corp. and Sumitomo Corp. was the only way ensure that the company would gain access to the entire Japanese marketplace.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Digital Corp., a struggling computer products manufacturer, received a helping hand from across the Pacific on Wednesday by signing a deal to develop a new generation of miniature computer disk drives with Tokyo-based Nippon Steel Corp. Under the agreement, Nippon Steel will provide financial and technical support to Western Digital to develop 1.8-inch disk drives in exchange for unspecified license rights to market or make some of the products.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | RICHARD O'REILLY, RICHARD O'REILLY is director of computer analysis for The Times
When Japanese industrial giant Nippon Steel Corp. decided to get into the U.S. computer market, it chose to make a laptop rather than a desktop model. The result is Librex Computer Systems Inc. of San Jose (408-441-8500), Nippon Steel's subsidiary with a line of 80286 and 80386SX laptop computers. What differentiates the various models in the lineup are the microprocessor and the capacity of the hard disk.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
MCA, which has long sought to build a Japanese theme park similar to its Universal Studios Tour, announced Thursday that it has found a partner in Nippon Steel Corp. of Japan to develop a "Universal Studios Japan." No site or construction schedule was divulged, but Nippon--the world's largest steel company--owns large parcels of land throughout Japan surrounding its 10 steel mills.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western Digital Corp., a struggling computer products manufacturer, received a helping hand from across the Pacific on Wednesday by signing a deal to develop a new generation of miniature computer disk drives with Tokyo-based Nippon Steel Corp. Under the agreement, Nippon Steel will provide financial and technical support to Western Digital to develop 1.8-inch disk drives in exchange for unspecified license rights to market or make some of the products.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | RICHARD O'REILLY, RICHARD O'REILLY is director of computer analysis for The Times
When Japanese industrial giant Nippon Steel Corp. decided to get into the U.S. computer market, it chose to make a laptop rather than a desktop model. The result is Librex Computer Systems Inc. of San Jose (408-441-8500), Nippon Steel's subsidiary with a line of 80286 and 80386SX laptop computers. What differentiates the various models in the lineup are the microprocessor and the capacity of the hard disk.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steel Firms Raise Price: The first steel price increase in nine years will add to Japanese auto makers' difficulties but won't be enough for steel makers to enjoy a rise in profits during the current fiscal year, analysts say. Negotiations between Toyota Motor Corp., Japan's largest auto maker, and Nippon Steel Corp., the world's largest steel maker, ended last week with an agreement to boost prices for thin stainless steel sheets by 4%,according to observers.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CalComp Inc. said Wednesday it has sold a majority interest in its Japanese marketing subsidiary to two major Japanese corporations in order to increase sales of its computer graphics products in that country. William P. Conlin, CalComp president, said in an interview that the sale of 56% of Nippon CalComp to Nippon Steel Corp. and Sumitomo Corp. was the only way ensure that the company would gain access to the entire Japanese marketplace.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Tokyo Stock Exchange reprimanded two companies, including Japan's largest steelmaker, on Friday for insider stock trading by their employees, an exchange executive told reporters. Takao Nojiri, a senior managing director of the exchange, said an investigation found that 34 employees of Nippon Steel and precision machinery maker Sankyo Seiki Manufacturing had traded Sankyo Seiki shares while possessing confidential information about a planned tie-up between the firms.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
MCA, which has long sought to build a Japanese theme park similar to its Universal Studios Tour, announced Thursday that it has found a partner in Nippon Steel Corp. of Japan to develop a "Universal Studios Japan." No site or construction schedule was divulged, but Nippon--the world's largest steel company--owns large parcels of land throughout Japan surrounding its 10 steel mills.
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