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SCIENCE
May 22, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Kudzu, a fast-growing and invasive Asian vine introduced in the American South several decades ago, has now blanketed more than 7 million acres of the region, making it sometimes seem more common than the hallmark azaleas, dogwoods and peach trees. Now there's evidence that the plant also increases air pollution. A paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reported a link between kudzu and the production of ozone, the colorless and odorless gas that is the main component of smog.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
For most of its 33-year history, Rentech Inc. tried to make money on green fuel development. But like its plans to sell synthetic diesel to major airlines in 2009, those efforts never really left the ground. Now, the Los Angeles company is on a different course. It's profiting from a nitrogen fertilizer business near the U.S. Corn Belt. A second nitrogen fertilizer plant in Pasadena, Texas, bought for $158 million last year, is boosting export sales to Brazil, New Zealand and Canada.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
For most of its 33-year history, Rentech Inc. tried to make money on green fuel development. But like its plans to sell synthetic diesel to major airlines in 2009, those efforts never really left the ground. Now, the Los Angeles company is on a different course. It's profiting from a nitrogen fertilizer business near the U.S. Corn Belt. A second nitrogen fertilizer plant in Pasadena, Texas, bought for $158 million last year, is boosting export sales to Brazil, New Zealand and Canada.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2013 | By Michael Mello
State and federal investigators in Louisiana are working to uncover what caused fatal blasts at two different chemical plants in the span of two days. The second explosion took place Friday night at the CF Industries plant in Donaldsonville, a small town along the Mississippi River between Baton Rouge and New Orleans. As of Saturday afternoon, one person had died in the blast and seven others were injured. On Thursday, an explosion at the Williams Olefins plant in Geismar killed two people and wounded dozens of others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1986
I read with a great deal of interest the article (Dec. 30), "New State Study Challenges Old Smog Theories." Having worked for several years on the subject of elimination of smog-forming components from automobile exhaust gases, it is my firm conviction that smog from this source can only and exclusively be eliminated by the reduction to an absolute minimum of the nitrogen oxides formed in the combustion of gasoline and air in the internal combustion...
SCIENCE
April 26, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Organic agriculture generally comes at a cost of smaller harvests compared with conventional agriculture, but that gap can be narrowed with careful selection of crop type, growing conditions and management techniques, according a new study. Organic farming has been touted by supporters as a more environmentally sustainable method of farming that's better for consumers because crops contain fewer man-made chemicals. But without the high-nitrogen fertilizers and pesticides often employed in conventional agriculture, it's also less efficient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Rock-eating snails appear to make a critical contribution to the fertilization of desert soils by speeding the return of a valuable nutrient--nitrogen--to the ground. The snails dine on a diet of limestone rock containing lichens, a mixture of nitrogen-containing fungi and algae, and return the nutrient to the soil in their feces, contributing 11% of the nitrogen released into the desert soil each year, researchers reported last week in the British journal Nature.
NEWS
December 13, 2005
Ship pollution -- An article in Friday's California section about state efforts to reduce air pollution from ship engines misidentified one of the targeted substances. It is oxides of nitrogen, not nitrous oxide.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
The California Air Resources Board on Thursday established a stringent new automobile emissions standard that would reduce nitrogen oxides by an estimated 144 tons a day, or a statewide reduction of nearly 15%. The action was vehemently opposed by the auto industry and supported by environmental groups. Car manufacturers said they may not be able to meet the new nitrogen oxides standard by the final 1994 deadline if other types of emissions standards are imposed, as is planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
A proposal to stiffen controls on nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from industrial plants and motor vehicles will be the subject of public hearings Feb. 26 and 27 in El Monte, the South Coast Air Quality Management District board decided Friday. Board member Larry Berg, who headed a board NOx task force, recommended next month's hearings, saying that further NOx reductions are needed to reduce ozone, or smog.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Organic agriculture generally comes at a cost of smaller harvests compared with conventional agriculture, but that gap can be narrowed with careful selection of crop type, growing conditions and management techniques, according a new study. Organic farming has been touted by supporters as a more environmentally sustainable method of farming that's better for consumers because crops contain fewer man-made chemicals. But without the high-nitrogen fertilizers and pesticides often employed in conventional agriculture, it's also less efficient.
WORLD
April 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Engineers began injecting nitrogen into one of the reactors at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant Wednesday evening as radiation levels in seawater near the plant dropped and a new report from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggested that the plant may face even more troubles in the future. Officials from the United Nations, meanwhile, said that even though the situation in Japan is more serious than the U.S. faced after the Three Mile Island accident in Pennsylvania in 1979, the group does not expect severe health consequences.
SCIENCE
December 14, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Call it Extreme Makeover: Chemistry Edition. That imposing, yellowing chart gracing the walls of every science classroom is about to get an update. The adjustments planned for the Periodic Table of the Elements will more accurately reflect the true nature of 10 kinds of atoms ? carbon, nitrogen and oxygen among them ? that play a key role in such real-world issues as detecting counterfeit food, tracing pollutants in rivers and nailing baseball players sneaking steroids. The Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights at the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry has decided the time has come to ensure that the figures listed on the official Table of Standard Atomic Weights properly indicate the variability that exists in nature.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Kudzu, a fast-growing and invasive Asian vine introduced in the American South several decades ago, has now blanketed more than 7 million acres of the region, making it sometimes seem more common than the hallmark azaleas, dogwoods and peach trees. Now there's evidence that the plant also increases air pollution. A paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reported a link between kudzu and the production of ozone, the colorless and odorless gas that is the main component of smog.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2010 | By Kim Geiger and David Zucchino
The remains of all four miners missing from the devastating explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine were found by rescue crews late Friday night, ending a desperate, four-day search for men who authorities now say were killed by the blast Monday afternoon. "We did not receive the miracle we prayed for," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III said at a news conference at 12:30 a.m. Eastern time. The discovery of the four bodies brings the total death toll from the explosion Monday at the mine to 29, making it the worst mining disaster in nearly 40 years.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2010 | By Kim Geiger and David Zucchino
Two rescue teams went underground into the wrecked Upper Big Branch mine early Friday in a desperate attempt to find four miners still missing after Monday's devastating explosion, which killed 25 workers. Authorities planned to pump nitrogen into a section of the mine to render dangerous gases inert and prevent another explosion as rescue crews inched forward. About the same time, recovery crews would attempt to find and remove the bodies of 18 miners killed in the worst coal mine disaster in a quarter-century.
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
"Tremendous amounts" of pollutants from automobile exhaust, deposited over decades in brush around Los Angeles, may become airborne during brush fires, according to scientists reporting the first results of a December experimental fire set in the Angeles National Forest.
SPORTS
July 20, 2002
Shame on the siblings for putting perhaps the most talented hitter to ever grace the earth in such an unenviable position, dead or alive. It's another black eye for baseball, baseball fans and the lovers of what once was. As we speak, poor Ted Williams must be turning over in his grave ... I mean, his liquid nitrogen-filled, cylindrical suspension holding chamber. Daniel R. Ramirez Lakewood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2010 | By Maura Dolan
The South Coast Air Quality Management District improperly permitted an oil refinery to implement a new industrial process without an environmental review even though the project might have caused substantially more air pollution, the California Supreme Court unanimously decided Monday. The state high court faulted the air quality district for determining that the project by ConocoPhillips Co. in Wilmington would not significantly hurt the environment. The court said the air district applied the wrong base rate when calculating the effect of the emissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
In an effort to clean the air along the nation's choked highways, the federal Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a major regulation to control nitrogen dioxide, a key factor in respiratory illness. The new EPA rule will be the subject of a public hearing today in Los Angeles, a region where the air is among the unhealthiest in the nation. Imposed under court order, it is the first to address the dangerous gas in 35 years.
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