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Nitrogen Oxide

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exhaust fumes from planes flying overhead have a far greater effect on the Earth's climate than equivalent sources on the ground, according to a new study. Colin Johnson of Britain's Harwell Laboratory has found that the effect on nitrogen oxides from aircraft is 30 times as great as the effect from other sources of equal magnitude on the ground.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Major changes are needed to correct scientific and technical deficiencies in the nation's regulatory programs to control low-atmosphere ozone, an important component of smog, according to a report from the National Research Council. Ozone control efforts have been based primarily upon controlling emissions of organic compounds, but the report concluded that in many areas of the country it would be more effective to stress control of nitrogen oxides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1991
One phrase in a report on smog last week by a National Academy of Sciences study group certainly got everybody's attention. It said that 20 years of efforts to reduce levels of ozone, which affects human health by stunting lung capacity and hampering the immune system, have failed to reach national goals. It went on to say that one reason was that "past ozone strategies may have been misdirected." No wonder that phrase caught everyone's eye.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Honda Motor Co.'s new "lean-burn" engine, touted as a significant advance in fuel efficiency, won't be offered for sale in California because it spews out too much nitrogen oxide, company officials now say. In announcing the engine July 30, the Japanese auto maker's U.S. representatives said it met both U.S. clean-air standards and the more stringent California requirements. But company officials acknowledged this week that they were mistaken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diesel commuter trains would initially create more of one type of pollution than all of the cars they would replace, transportation officials conceded Tuesday, but they said the trains would slash pollution overall and are an important interim step until rail lines can be electrified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South Coast Air Quality Management District board unanimously voted Friday for a stringent regulation to reduce pollution from the manufacture of electricity, one of the largest industrial contributors to the region's smog. The giant Southern California Edison Co., which is responsible for half the region's utility emissions, endorsed the measure, closing years of both public and private debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991
Southern California Edison Co.'s turnabout on an air quality rule it spent years trying to kill is one of the more hopeful signs of the times. It says that advocates of cleaner air haven't lost their touch. It also speaks volumes about the wisdom of turning over control of a utility to someone with a strong environmental record who seems not to mind admitting a mistake--in this case John Bryson, Edison's new chairman.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four years of battling stringent air pollution controls, Southern California Edison Co. is supporting a new proposal to restrict emissions from electric power plants, Edison Chairman John Bryson said Wednesday. The utility's stance removes a major obstacle to ending the long stalemate over how to control emissions of nitrogen oxides from power plant boilers, one of the largest contributors of the pollutant to Los Angeles skies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California Edison is challenging Ventura County's legal right to require a drastic reduction in Edison's pollution-causing emissions without first performing more studies. Depending on the results of such studies, Edison might also challenge the county's plan to require the utility to reduce by 90% the emissions from its two power plants in Oxnard, a company official said. And if the studies aren't done, the company may sue before it makes any reductions, the company's attorneys hint.
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