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March 7, 2010
'Nixon in China' What: Long Beach Opera Where: Terrace Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach When: 8 p.m. March 20 and 4 p.m. March 28 Price: $5 to $95 Contact: (562) 435-2994, www.longbeachopera.org Running time: 3 hours, 30 minutes
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Johanna Neuman
Robert S. Strauss, a one-time chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a Washington insider who combined earthy Texas charm with raw political power, died Wednesday. He was 95. A spokesman for Strauss' Washington law firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, confirmed his death but would release no other details. A U.S. trade representative in the Carter administration, Strauss was a poker-playing, cigar-chomping, power-lunch-eating rainmaker who was so successful at recruiting mega-clients that he stopped billing by the hour in the 1970s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1998
Whitewater is nothing like Watergate: Nixon lied to protect his friends; Clinton lied to protect himself. THOMAS A. BUTTERWORTH Newport Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Joe McGinniss, the adventurous and news-making author and reporter who skewered the marketing of Richard Nixon in "The Selling of the President 1968" and tracked his personal journey from sympathizer to scourge of convicted killer Jeffrey MacDonald in the blockbuster "Fatal Vision," died Monday at a hospital in Worcester, Mass. He was 71. McGinniss died from complications of prostate cancer, according to his attorney and longtime friend Dennis Holahan. Few journalists of his time so intrepidly pursued a story, burned so many bridges or more memorably placed themselves in the narrative, whether insisting on the guilt of MacDonald after seemingly befriending him or moving next door to Sarah Palin's house for a most unauthorized biography of the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1988
So unregenerate former criminal Nixon thinks pardons are a good idea. Some surprise. NBC should be ashamed for airing this nonsense, and Reagan should be impeached if he follows the advice. RICHARD MILES Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992
Nixon and Kissinger have found the new example of democracy in the world--Russia . . . and Bush and Baker have found the new evil empire--Israel! A.S. EPSTEIN, Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
Hurrah for Greenberg! His remarks about Nixon serve as a much needed reminder of both Nixon's shameful deeds and his unpardonable pardon, which Greenberg aptly characterizes as "one of the great triumphs of cynicism in American political history." I agree completely that "to leave justice undone is to lower the moral tone of all society." Our moral tone is already low enough. Let's not forget Nixon--not because of mere vindictiveness, but as a way of ensuring vigilance and avoiding recurrence.
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Former President Richard M. Nixon was reported doing well today as he recovered from prostate surgery at New York Hospital. Nixon, 74, "underwent an uneventful transurethral resection of the prostate" on Monday, hospital spokeswoman Myrna Manners said in a statement. "It's anticipated he will be discharged in several days and he is expected to convalesce at home for about a month." A spokesman for the former President, John Taylor, said the operation went smoothly and no malignancy was involved.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Audiotape of a casual phone conversation in the new documentary "Our Nixon" reveals a startling fact about President Nixon and his staff: that they were unfamiliar with the most popular television program in America at the time, "All in the Family. " In the call, White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman seemed to think the influential sitcom was a panel show, and Nixon thought it was a movie that villainized a "square hard hat" (Archie Bunker). Forty-one years after the Watergate scandal first broke, the seemingly prosaic detail about the Nixon White House's lack of pop culture awareness provides the kind of context that often gets lost when the first draft of history is written.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
David Frost badgered statesmen and made small talk with stars, but one exchange towered over all the others in his 50-year career. "You've explained how you have got caught up in this thing," he told Richard Nixon in his famous 1977 TV interviews with the disgraced former president. "You've explained your motives: I don't want to quibble about any of that. But just coming to the substance: Would you go further than 'mistakes' -- the word that seems not enough for people?" Nixon -- three years after stepping down from office in the wake of Watergate -- astonished the unflappably British Frost by appearing to acknowledge that "mistakes" may have been too mild a term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | Christopher Goffard and Paloma Esquivel
They were great antagonists of the Cold War, the avowedly Red-hating American president and the world's most powerful communist. Yet when Richard Nixon hosted Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev for a summit in June 1973, their private exchanges had the casual, meandering comity of old friends. Meeting his Soviet counterpart privately in the Oval Office, with only a translator accompanying them, Nixon said the world's safety hinged on their mutual trust. "Mr. Brezhnev and I have the key, and I think that our personal relationship will unlock the door," Nixon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
White House tapes released Wednesday capture President Richard Nixon grappling with the growing Watergate scandal while continuing to press forward on major foreign-affairs initiatives, including a historic meeting with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. The 340 hours of recordings released by the National Archives and Records Administration  cover about three months in 1973, from April 9 through July 12. They include excerpts from Nixon's meetings with several heads of state and discussions about Watergate, the implementation of the Vietnam peace settlement, and Washington's relationships with the U.S.S.R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The final installment of 94 White House tapes recorded during a turbulent period of Richard Nixon's administration were released Wednesday at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda. The tapes cover a period from April 9 to July 12, 1973, as Watergate was bearing down on the administration. Included in the hours of secretly taped conversations are discussions of the Vietnam War peace settlement and the return of prisoners of war, tensions over “most favored nation” trade status for the Soviet Union and other key foreign policy issues of the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Christopher Goffard and Paloma Esquivel
They were great antagonists of the Cold War, the avowedly Red-hating American president and the world's most powerful Communist. Yet when Richard Nixon hosted Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev for a summit in June 1973, their private exchanges had the casual, meandering comity of old friends. Meeting his Russian counterpart privately in the Oval Office, with only a translator accompanying them, Nixon said the world's safety hinged on their mutual trust. “Mr. Brezhnev and I have the key, and I think that our personal relationship will unlock the door,” Nixon said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
The Writers Guild of America might think of “All in the Family” as the second-greatest sitcom of all time , after “Seinfeld,” but were he alive today, Richard Nixon would almost certainly disagree. As “Our Nixon,” a new documentary airing Thursday night on CNN makes clear, the late president was no fan of the Norman Lear sitcom and its gay-friendly agenda. The film, which made the festival rounds earlier this year, is pieced together from over 500 reels of silent, Super 8 footage shot by three of Richard Nixon's closest aides -- H.R. Haldeman, John D. Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin -- and seized by the FBI following the Watergate scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2013
Berthold Beitz Industrialist honored for saving Jews during WWII Berthold Beitz, 99, who was honored for saving hundreds of Jews in occupied Poland during World War II and became one of postwar West Germany's leading industrialists, died Tuesday. Steelmaker ThyssenKrupp, where he was the honorary chairman of the supervisory board, announced his death but gave no further details. Beitz and his wife, Else, were honored by Germany's main Jewish group in 2000 for saving hundreds of Jewish workers at an oil field he managed in occupied Poland from deportation to Nazi death camps.
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