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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan
Donald C. Alexander, the Internal Revenue Service commissioner who successfully fought the Nixon administration's attempts to use tax audits and investigations to punish its political enemies, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Washington, D.C. He was 87. Alexander ran the IRS from 1973 to 1977, when the agency came under severe public scrutiny for its earlier role in investigating political opponents and radicals on the far right and left.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 24, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Economist Sung Won Sohn, 66, is always in motion. He holds the Martin V. Smith professorship at Cal State Channel Islands in Camarillo, where he also directs the Institute for Global Economic Research. He's vice chairman of the board of clothing chain Forever 21 Inc., based in Los Angeles, and sits on the boards of Western Alliance Bank Corp. in Phoenix and Torrey Pines Bank in San Diego. And Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa recently appointed the Hancock Park resident to a five-year term on the commission overseeing the Port of Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Roger Egeberg, chief health officer in the Nixon administration and former dean of the USC School of Medicine and medical director of County-USC Medical Center, has died. He was 93. Egeberg, in his later years a senior scholar at the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine, died Friday of pneumonia at his home in Washington. Salty and outspoken, Egeberg gained a reputation as the most colorful character in the upper echelons of the Nixon administration.
OPINION
October 8, 2010 | By Jon Wiener
In 1972, John Lennon had a problem. He and his wife, Yoko Ono, had been living in New York for a year, and they wanted to stay. But it happened also to be the year President Nixon was running for reelection. Opposition to the Vietnam War had reached a peak, and Lennon and Ono often showed up at antiwar rallies to sing "Give Peace a Chance" ? and to tell their fans that the best way to give peace a chance was to vote against Nixon. The Nixon White House responded by ordering Lennon deported.
OPINION
March 24, 1996 | LAWRENCE R. JACOBS and ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO, Lawrence R. Jacobs and Robert Y. Shapiro are political science professors at, respectively, the University of Minnesota and Columbia University. This commentary is based on their article in the winter issue of Political Science Quarterly
America's leading pollsters, Louis Harris and the Gallup organization, have long had a policy of sharing information with presidents. One of President Clinton's pollsters, Stan Greenberg, acknowledges that he regularly communicates with pollsters who work for the media. Harris and George Gallup Jr. strenuously defend the practice of cooperating with any president who approaches them.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Economist Sung Won Sohn, 66, is always in motion. He holds the Martin V. Smith professorship at Cal State Channel Islands in Camarillo, where he also directs the Institute for Global Economic Research. He's vice chairman of the board of clothing chain Forever 21 Inc., based in Los Angeles, and sits on the boards of Western Alliance Bank Corp. in Phoenix and Torrey Pines Bank in San Diego. And Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa recently appointed the Hancock Park resident to a five-year term on the commission overseeing the Port of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
Greenberg says, "The Nixons of the world fascinate, whether they head a government or a mob (the difference wasn't always clear in the Nixon Administration)." May I add that it's even less clear in the current Administration. LAURA HUGHES Hesperia
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
With the National Archives' release of the final installment of the "abuse of government power tapes" involving the Nixon Administration, the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace Foundation has released the transcripts on its Web site: http://www.nixonfoundation.org. A24
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MARY LOU FULTON
* Jan. 9, 1913--Born Yorba Linda; attended elementary schools in Yorba Linda and Fullerton. "He was a good student and was always ready to recite or to answer questions. . . . Richard always knew the answers and had his hand up first." --Yonika Iwatsuru a second-grade classmate of Nixon's at Yorba Linda Elementary School * 1922--Moved to Whittier, where his father ran a general store and service station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1990
I suppose that I should not find it surprising that Reagan, whose Administration was involved in everything from illegal arms deals to supporting terrorists, is praising Nixon's record. While the activities of the Nixon Administration may seem somewhat tame by comparison, that makes them no less repugnant. Perhaps we are as a nation forgetting what responsible leadership means to such an extent that someday the appalling actions of Nixon will seem commonplace, and historians will indeed praise his achievements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan
Donald C. Alexander, the Internal Revenue Service commissioner who successfully fought the Nixon administration's attempts to use tax audits and investigations to punish its political enemies, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Washington, D.C. He was 87. Alexander ran the IRS from 1973 to 1977, when the agency came under severe public scrutiny for its earlier role in investigating political opponents and radicals on the far right and left.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2009 | Washington Post
Vera Glaser, a veteran Washington reporter whose tough question to President Richard Nixon about the role of women in his administration led to changes in the recruiting policies in his administration, has died. She was 92. Glaser, the Washington bureau chief for the former North American Newspaper Alliance syndicate of 90 newspapers and national correspondent and syndicated columnist for the old Knight Ridder newspaper chain, died Nov. 26 in Chevy Chase, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles W. Bray, 72, spokesman for former Secretary of State William P. Rogers during the tumultuous days of the Nixon administration, died Sunday of pneumonia at his home in Milwaukee. Bray was Rogers' press secretary during much of the Vietnam War but resigned in 1973 after Henry Kissinger replaced Rogers as secretary of state. Bray left because he was angry that the White House, acting without court orders, had wiretapped some high-ranking State Department officials.
OPINION
July 16, 2006 | Morton H. Halperin, MORTON H. HALPERIN served in the administrations of presidents Johnson, Nixon and Clinton. He is a senior fellow of the Center for American Progress and the director of U.S. Advocacy for the Open Society Institute.
THE BUSH administration's warrantless wiretapping program may have shocked and surprised many Americans when it was revealed in December, but to me, it provoked a case of deja vu. The Nixon administration bugged my home phone -- without a warrant -- beginning in 1973, when I was on the staff of the National Security Council, and kept the wiretap on for 21 months. Why? My boss, national security advisor Henry Kissinger, and FBI Director J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Keogh, 89, a former executive editor of Time magazine who served in communication roles through the troubled years of the Nixon administration, died Wednesday of respiratory failure in Greenwich, Conn., his family said. Keogh, who lived in Greenwich, joined the Nixon administration in 1969 as a special assistant to the president and became head speechwriter about a year later. He also was director of the U.S. Information Agency, which advocates U.S. interests abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Norman B. Houston, 81, a former assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare and a former member of the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, died Jan. 13 at his home in Los Angeles. A native of Los Angeles, Houston attended UC Berkeley before joining the Army during World War II. After the war, he continued his education, this time at UCLA, where he received his degree in banking and finance in 1948.
NEWS
February 23, 1987
Richard M. Nixon decided in October, 1971, to end J. Edgar Hoover's 48-year tenure as director of the FBI and name him a "consultant to the President," NBC News said. The network said the decision is reflected in the locked Nixon personal files at the National Archives but that it is unclear from the papers whether Nixon ever told Hoover he was fired. Hoover died in May, 1972, still in the job as director.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George W. Bush was worried about Richard Nixon, but he needn't have been. Informed that the National Archives was releasing a new batch of Watergate-era tapes Thursday, a top aide to the Texas governor suspected that the fine hand of the White House might be involved. Was there an embarrassing conversation between President Nixon and Bush's father from long ago that was about to be exposed less than two weeks before the Nov. 7 election?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, Amy Wallace is a Calendar staff writer
On June 17, 1972, five burglars were arrested in the Watergate apartment complex in Washington. The break-in sparked the biggest political scandal in U.S. history and resulted in the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, who promptly returned to his native California to write his memoirs. Nixon would later acknowledge mistakes of judgment on Watergate, but he died in 1994 still denying he'd committed an impeachable offense.
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