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Nixon Tapes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998
Re "Court Rules Some Nixon Tapes Are Private," April 1: What do we have to use as a basis of comparison in studying the Nixon tapes? Absolutely nothing! Congress saw to that when it passed the Presidential Recordings and Materials Preservation Act of 1974, which affects one president's papers and no other's. There should be a law against that kind of a law. JEAN M. BALDWIN El Segundo
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | Christopher Goffard and Paloma Esquivel
They were great antagonists of the Cold War, the avowedly Red-hating American president and the world's most powerful communist. Yet when Richard Nixon hosted Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev for a summit in June 1973, their private exchanges had the casual, meandering comity of old friends. Meeting his Soviet counterpart privately in the Oval Office, with only a translator accompanying them, Nixon said the world's safety hinged on their mutual trust. "Mr. Brezhnev and I have the key, and I think that our personal relationship will unlock the door," Nixon said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The final installment of 94 White House tapes recorded during a turbulent period of Richard Nixon's administration were released Wednesday at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda. The tapes cover a period from April 9 to July 12, 1973, as Watergate was bearing down on the administration. Included in the hours of secretly taped conversations are discussions of the Vietnam War peace settlement and the return of prisoners of war, tensions over “most favored nation” trade status for the Soviet Union and other key foreign policy issues of the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
White House tapes released Wednesday capture President Richard Nixon grappling with the growing Watergate scandal while continuing to press forward on major foreign-affairs initiatives, including a historic meeting with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. The 340 hours of recordings released by the National Archives and Records Administration  cover about three months in 1973, from April 9 through July 12. They include excerpts from Nixon's meetings with several heads of state and discussions about Watergate, the implementation of the Vietnam peace settlement, and Washington's relationships with the U.S.S.R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
White House tapes released Tuesday capture Richard Nixon as a pugnacious second-term president who talks of hammering out an end to the Vietnam War even if he has to "cut off the head" of the South Vietnamese leader, remarks that an abortion might be necessary if a pregnancy involved an interracial couple and appears preoccupied with savaging his political foes. As Nixon was negotiating an end to U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997
In the Nov. 9 edition of The Times, which featured a front-page article about Seymour Hersh's book on the late President John F. Kennedy, a book debunking the confident and capable image of Kennedy and attacking him for fatal character flaws, there is a Robert Scheer review of "Abuse of Power: The New Nixon Tapes." While Hersh relies on hearsay, conjecture and secondhand accounts that would never withstand evidentiary scrutiny in a court of law, the Nixon tapes are self-authenticating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996
In view of the indispensable role the Nixon family and estate took in bringing about a schedule for the release of Nixon White House tapes, the vituperative tone of your editorial on the subject was in poor taste indeed (April 16). You also misinformed your readers about the central issue in President Nixon's long-standing dispute with the National Archives. You fail to inform your readers that several other presidents taped conversations secretly too. Now that the Nixon family has paved the way for a massive and unprecedented release of such recordings, did it occur to you to ask about the status of the unreleased secret tapes housed at other presidential libraries?
NEWS
November 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
For two decades, President Nixon's White House tapes have been preserved and protected in a cold storage vault at the National Archives. Now, technicians are slicing them up with a razor blade. Not that they want to. A judge ordered the archives to cut out personal, private and some political conversations from the 3,280 hours of conversations the public still hasn't heard. Nixon discusses his daughter Tricia's Rose Garden wedding. Snip. Nixon plans a political campaign trip. Snip.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the American public being asked to pay twice for what some historians regard as the priceless legacy of President Nixon's Watergate tapes? That question, which a federal judge must decide, arises as yearlong litigation over the value of Nixon's recordings and other presidential materials nears a conclusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The final installment of 94 White House tapes recorded during a turbulent period of Richard Nixon's administration were released Wednesday at the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda. The tapes cover a period from April 9 to July 12, 1973, as Watergate was bearing down on the administration. Included in the hours of secretly taped conversations are discussions of the Vietnam War peace settlement and the return of prisoners of war, tensions over “most favored nation” trade status for the Soviet Union and other key foreign policy issues of the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Months of eavesdropping on two drug trafficking organizations that smuggled methamphetamine and cocaine across the border from Mexico culminated in the federal indictment of 30 suspects in a drug trafficking conspiracy. During early mornings raids Wednesday, seven of the named defendants were arrested at homes across Southern California as part of the 12-count indictment involving the transportation, distribution and delivery of drugs throughout Los Angeles and surrounding counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013 | By Christopher Goffard and Paloma Esquivel
They were great antagonists of the Cold War, the avowedly Red-hating American president and the world's most powerful Communist. Yet when Richard Nixon hosted Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev for a summit in June 1973, their private exchanges had the casual, meandering comity of old friends. Meeting his Russian counterpart privately in the Oval Office, with only a translator accompanying them, Nixon said the world's safety hinged on their mutual trust. “Mr. Brezhnev and I have the key, and I think that our personal relationship will unlock the door,” Nixon said.
OPINION
April 2, 2011 | Patt Morrison
Timothy Naftali is the kind of learned guy you'd want on your team when you play "Trivial Pursuit" -- a game that, like Naftali, originated in Canada. But for years, his home and his career have been in and about the United States -- books and studies on espionage, counter-terrorism, the Cuban missile crisis, U.S. intelligence. And now he is director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. That would be the new Nixon library, the one operated under the auspices of the National Archives.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2009 | Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
Something of an inside-baseball media controversy was growing out of President Obama's news conference and the way he set up one particular question on Iran. As you can see from the news conference transcript -- which can be found at latimes.com/ticket -- the president clearly had advance knowledge that Nico Pitney, national editor of Huffington Post, was present and had a question concerning Iran.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | Christopher Goffard
White House tapes released Tuesday capture Richard Nixon as a pugnacious second-term president who talks of hammering out an end to the Vietnam War even if he has to "cut off the head" of the South Vietnamese leader, remarks that an abortion might be necessary if a pregnancy involved an interracial couple and appears preoccupied with savaging his political foes. As Nixon was negotiating an end to U.S.
OPINION
December 13, 2008
Re "Still kicking Nixon around," editorial, Dec. 6 As an archivist, I once faced fire from Richard Nixon's lawyers, and I fired right back. Yet even I am troubled by sneers at the Nixon foundation. Starting with the first one in 1941, all presidential libraries, not just Nixon's, have had federal and private-sector components. Government archivists work with presidents and their families to open records. Archivists also work on exhibits funded in part by presidential foundations.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
In one call, President Richard Nixon is on the telephone to Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir talking about peace in the Middle East. On another, he is directing the White House chief of staff to make sure his daughter Tricia gets a refrigerator in her room. And he tells his chief of staff that California Gov. Ronald Reagan, who had challenged Nixon for the Republican presidential nomination in 1968, is "an uncomfortable man to be around."
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