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No Fault Auto Insurance

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OPINION
October 1, 1989
The state government's response to Proposition 103 shows what a sham democracy is in this state. The insurance companies have invested their money wisely in the state capitol. Is the state executive office going to enforce the expressed will of the voter population at the cost of all that money from lobbyists? Of course not. The sandbagging and stonewalling will continue as long as possible. Free enterprise has its merits when left totally to itself. When the state forces participation in a limited market and then refuses to control the seller, you have the California insurance industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | ALAN J. PETERSON, Alan J. Peterson lives in Santa Paula
We all understand the constitutionally guaranteed right to a trial by our peers. However, the ballooning of the judicial system, brought on largely by the "lottery" attitude toward personal-injury lawsuits and the drug industry, is out of hand and desperately in need of overhaul. The Times missed that point in its article, "Tough Rules for Jury Duty Try Patience of Residents," May 28. Recently I wasted a full day serving my "civic duty" along with 150 more silent lambs in the jury assembly room.
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NEWS
March 28, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Wednesday embraced a no-fault automobile insurance proposal he said would stabilize rates for all California drivers and provide a cheap, "no-frills" policy for motorists who might otherwise drive illegally without insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1996 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No-fault auto insurance, defeated as a ballot measure in 1988, goes back before the voters on March 26. Proposition 200 would prohibit most automobile accident lawsuits, while at the same time require a minimum insurance policy to register a car. The proposal is one of three anti-lawyer measures on the ballot. Supporters say that attorneys and lawsuits have been driving up insurance premiums. Opponents argue that under a no-fault system a driver has less accountability for his or her actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993
I am living proof that we need to quickly adopt pay-at-the-pump, private, no-fault auto insurance and to get rid of an unproductive system that rewards greedy doctors and lawyers, costs an arm and a leg and buries everyone in paperwork. I was involved in a two-car accident a year and a half ago, and the other driver, more than a year after the accident, decided to get a bunch of expensive surgery and come after me for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Meanwhile, I pay what amounts to a private school tuition annually for insurance, despite having a relatively unblemished driving record and an inexpensive, fuel-thrifty car. Consequently, the idea of a system that relieves us of lawsuits, insurance hucksters and uninsured motorists while reducing costs and encouraging fuel conservation is most appealing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1995 | Dick Thornburgh, Dick Thornburgh is a former U.S. attorney general and former governor of Pennsylvania
House and Senate conferees this week are preparing to hammer out final legislation to reform our civil justice system. How far they go and whether President Clinton signs or vetoes this measure will determine whether we will restore the rule of law in America's lawsuit system. Does that sound overwrought?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993
I am living proof that we need to quickly adopt pay-at-the-pump, private, no-fault auto insurance and to get rid of an unproductive system that rewards greedy doctors and lawyers, costs an arm and a leg and buries everyone in paperwork. I was involved in a two-car accident a year and a half ago, and the other driver, more than a year after the accident, decided to get a bunch of expensive surgery and come after me for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Meanwhile, I pay what amounts to a private school tuition annually for insurance, despite having a relatively unblemished driving record and an inexpensive, fuel-thrifty car. Consequently, the idea of a system that relieves us of lawsuits, insurance hucksters and uninsured motorists while reducing costs and encouraging fuel conservation is most appealing.
OPINION
May 26, 1991 | HARVEY ROSENFIELD, Harvey Rosenfield is chairman of Voter Revolt, the grass-roots group that sponsored Proposition 103
With the state commissioner no longer in their pocket, insurance companies are urgently pressing legislators to enact no-fault auto insurance. Their latest proposal would require every motorist to buy a meager no-fault policy that does not cover property damage, fire or theft. Most Southern Californians would have to buy thousands of dollars worth of additional coverage to insure themselves against lawsuits by those whose no-fault policies don't fully cover their own bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
Clever opponents of no-fault auto insurance (letters, May 10) argue that it lost to Proposition 103 in 1988 and is not effective in other states. True, no-fault legislation has failed in some other states where the legal lobby intentionally weakened the bill when it could not be defeated. The California bill, however, is modeled on the successes of Michigan and New York. Voters angry with the failure of the Legislature to pass meaningful auto insurance reform voted for Proposition 103 because it promised relief from high premiums.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday upped the ante on legislation to enact low-cost, no-fault auto insurance, vowing to veto a rival bill by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown and repeatedly assailing the California Trial Lawyers Assn. for allegedly blocking insurance reform. Wilson, in Los Angeles, said that heavy pressure will be placed on legislators who have sided with the trial lawyers against no-fault to instead support a $220-a-year basic no-fault auto insurance policy proposed for good drivers.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The insurance industry funded a $300,000 advertising campaign in minority newspapers and on Spanish-language radio stations throughout the state this week in an attempt to pressure Latino and black lawmakers into supporting a no-fault auto insurance bill that had been scheduled for its first legislative hearing on Tuesday. But on Friday, the hearing on the bill--sponsored by state Sen.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Wednesday embraced a no-fault automobile insurance proposal he said would stabilize rates for all California drivers and provide a cheap, "no-frills" policy for motorists who might otherwise drive illegally without insurance.
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