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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1991
As president of the Ventura County Contractors Assn., I feel compelled to voice the construction industry's concerns about the Ventura City Council's adamant no-growth policy. Using the water shortage is an excuse, not the reason. The no-growth advocates do not seem to grasp the effects that no growth will have on not only the construction industry, but on the general public as well. With no new housing inventory, the cost of existing housing will increase dramatically. There will also be a construction exodus from Ventura.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Citing a large drop-off in private student loan originations, a JPMorgan Chase & Co. spokeswoman confirmed Friday that the bank would stop issuing student loans Oct. 12. "Over the last five years, students have increasingly relied on government-backed loans," said spokeswoman Trish Wexler. As a result, "we no longer see meaningful growth in this market," she said. PHOTOS: The costliest bank failures  The lender had already started scaling back its student loan business.
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OPINION
August 14, 1988
Short-sighted views will create long-range nightmares. The no-growth advocates, while well intended, are defining a classic example of putting the cart before the horse--especially in the housing arena. Given our burgeoning population growth, where do they expect these people to live? Or do they believe as if by magic--that since there is a shortage of housing--that the births will stop or the immigration will stop? If they believe that, perhaps we had better stop building apartments and start building loony bins.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2008 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from falling home values, high oil prices and rising unemployment, the economy in California and the nation will perform anemically in the coming months -- but there still won't be an actual recession, UCLA forecasters say. "I am holding on to what is now a shaky view: no recession this year," said economist Edward Leamer, director of the quarterly UCLA Anderson Forecast, which is being released today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1988
History always repeats itself! Now the slow-growth activists with their unreasonable, unfounded and unrealistic ideas are trying to persuade Orange County to commit economic suicide. The lessons of history learned in the state of Colorado over the last 10 years should be known to Orange County voters. The governing elite of Colorado were no-growth activists, and their liberal followers created a no-growth atmosphere and attitude in the early 1980s. The no-growth policy took its toll in 1988!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990
Without the assurance of future water, Ventura County is dead for future business growth. The no-growth advocates have won--hands down. Their wildest dreams are now realized. The news media are already smearing Santa Barbara across the front page of the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and now on CNN. USA Today's headline said, "The Central Coast Is Dried Up." That includes us. Public perception is everything, and the perception now is, "They are about to start drinking their bath water!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1987
I just had the opportunity to read Jeff Perlman's lengthy and informative feature on South County's two no-growth developers, Tom Rogers and Russ Burkett ("Mavericks Fight for South County Dream," Dec. 7), and several comments caught my attention. One was Burkett's remarks about his wife's complaint: "My wife's bugging me to move. She says there's already too many people here and that she can't get out of her driveway. She talks about southern Utah. Southern Utah doesn't have any people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1999
Re "A Chance for More Progress," Ventura County editorial, Nov. 21. For a newspaper that is sometimes quite remarkable in the depth of its reporting, I couldn't believe the superficiality of this commentary on outgoing Thousand Oaks Mayor Linda Parks. Let's set the record straight. Linda Parks is not a leader of the slow-growth movement. She is one of the major players of a no-growth movement that has paralyzed our county with emotional terrorism. Never are the destructive actions of Parks and her no-growth faction brought to light--and it is those actions that are ruining our community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1988
The Oct. 20 article "Slow-Growth Measure in San Clemente Voided" was good news. The courts have ruled that it is unfair for local government to place all road improvement responsibilities on builders. The no-growthers who drafted the initiative were shortsighted in trying to place such a responsibility on any single group in the community. The positive thing about the decision, however, is that it puts the weight on all of our shoulders. Growth helps all of us. The problems we encounter belong to all of us too. I am a member of the building industry, and I am proud of what our industry continues to contribute to solve problems like transportation.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The vision of Ventura in 2010 that has emerged from two weeks of marathon late-night hearings by the Ventura City Council is not all that different from the Ventura of today--just bigger by about 21,000 people, with more hillside homes and less development in the flatlands. In a series of tough choices pitting environmentalists and no-growth advocates against land developers and most of the business community, the council made some concessions to both sides while holding a political middle ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2007 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Concerned that their suburban lifestyle is being threatened, residents in Ventura County's two largest cities are hoping to put the brakes on traffic generated by future development with two separate ballot initiatives. Oxnard activists turned in petitions last week for a proposed measure that would limit new commercial and residential development near busy intersections until existing traffic problems could be resolved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001
Your Aug. 5 editorial, "Growth No Longer a Given,," as well as recent coverage on related matters in sSouth Orange County, give me great concern. You continue to suggest that there is some sort of heightened environmental activism taking place in South County, and perhaps to some limited extent that is so. The fact is that most of this so-called "local" activism is artificial at best. You've reported that Dan Silver of the Endangered Habitats League is from Los Angeles. When did people with an L.A. address come to be known as SSouth County activists?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1999
Re "A Chance for More Progress," Ventura County editorial, Nov. 21. For a newspaper that is sometimes quite remarkable in the depth of its reporting, I couldn't believe the superficiality of this commentary on outgoing Thousand Oaks Mayor Linda Parks. Let's set the record straight. Linda Parks is not a leader of the slow-growth movement. She is one of the major players of a no-growth movement that has paralyzed our county with emotional terrorism. Never are the destructive actions of Parks and her no-growth faction brought to light--and it is those actions that are ruining our community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | ROSEANN MIKOS, Roseann Mikos is president of the Moorpark branch of the Environmental Coalition and co-author of the Moorpark SOAR initiative. She can be reached at rmikos@earthlink.net
Here we go again. More sour grapes from a sore loser who doesn't want to accept who won the elections over Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources ("SOAR Closes the Gate to Development," Ventura County Perspective, Aug. 29.) The voters who passed SOAR by more than a 2-1 margin knew that there's plenty of room to grow throughout Ventura County in areas that do not require voter approval. If Jon Haines doesn't know that, as president-elect of the Simi Valley-Moorpark Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999 | JON HAINES, Jon Haines is president-elect of the Simi Valley-Moorpark Assn. of Realtors
Ventura County is America's largest gated community. Not true, you say? Then consider this: With the passage of SOAR (Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources) initiatives, the residents of Ventura County, excluding Santa Paula and Fillmore, have chosen to cut themselves off from new development outside current city boundaries for the next 20 years without a majority vote on any specific development by the affected city and county voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a ban on development, a ban on more fast-food restaurants, a ban on new liquor stores and pawnshops, and a crackdown on illicit massage parlors. San Juan Capistrano has also turned up its nose at a proposed Wal-Mart, while a Home Depot hasn't exactly gotten roses and the red carpet. Then there was that secret deal to build an Indian casino--the City Council went stratospheric over that one. To outsiders and some locals, city government here may have taken just-say-no to an extreme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1985
I am disturbed by the inaccuracy and obvious bias shown in your June 13 article on the San Diego Managed Growth Initiative ("S.D. No-Growth Initiative Closer to a Spot on Ballot"). Both the article and the headline presented it as a "no-growth" initiative, which is an untrue allegation and accepts as fact the distorted interpretation and fears of the initiative's opponents. Pertinent background clarifying the intent of and motivation for this initiative was notably lacking in your write up. The Growth Management Plan for San Diego was developed over a period of five years with extensive citizen input through planning board meetings, along with a sizable expenditure on consulting fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988
I'm mad as hell about the no-growth initiative. I am saving for a down payment on our first home. Believe me, it is not easy. If you read the classifieds, the average home costs upward of $150,000. Now, along comes this no-growth initiative. It will reduce new home building to 4,000 houses a year. What does that do to housing prices? They go even higher. In fact, I heard about a study that said home prices will increase by more than 2.5% if the no-growth initiative passes.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hotel desk clerk Katie Wintrol sees them nearly every day. Moving vans, station wagons and pickups--all overloaded with furniture, housewares, parents and kids--pull into the Best Western for a night or two of lodging before the families put down roots in this picturesque mountain community. The only problem Wintrol sees is that most of these vehicles parked in her lot are coming from the same place: California. "People here just hate Californians," she said. "People are worried."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1992 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
No one can accuse the Ramones of being trendy. Long before recycling became fashionable, New York's punk pioneers were using the same riffs, the same chords, the same catch phrases, the same minimal melodies, even the same style of leather jacket over and over again. Sixteen years after the band's first album, it's hard to point to any evolution in style or substance.
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